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Counting for Nothing: What Men Value and What Women are Worth

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4.47  ·  Rating details ·  125 ratings  ·  9 reviews
Safe drinking water counts for nothing. A pollution-free environment counts for nothing. Even some people - namely women - count for nothing. This is the case, at least, according to the United Nations System of National Accounts. Author Marilyn Waring, former New Zealand M.P., now professor, development consultant, writer, and goat farmer, isolates the gender bias that ex ...more
Paperback, Second Edition, 362 pages
Published December 15th 1999 by University of Toronto Press (first published 1988)
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Barry
Oct 24, 2007 rated it really liked it
Makes the very obvious but important point that the only things that 'count' in conventional economics are those things that are counted: namely money. Unpaid work, the environment, quality of society and community - all count for nothing. This leads to really bad economic policy. ...more
Teghan
Oct 30, 2010 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Simply AMAZING. When this book was first published it was groundbreaking. Two decades later and this book is still relevant. An economist, Waring brings a fabulous perspective to the issue of women's rights as well as the mathematical background to prove the conclusions she produces.

While it can be a bit dry in parts, this book is simply fabulous. Really honest and eye-opening look at how the world works.

Waring, as a person is particularly awesome too.
...more
MrsPL
Jan 03, 2011 rated it really liked it
Essential reading for anyone interested in economics and/or women's issues. ...more
Wendy
Nov 16, 2007 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: economics, politics
Reading this book -- when I was freshly out of the college and still strangely optimistic -- was a revelation. If has informed many other writers' and thinkers' work, as well as my own life. ...more
Isabell
Aug 30, 2013 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: non-fiction, oceania
I am forever thankful to my economics teacher during my IB years for introducing me to Marilyn Waring and feminist economics. So much of what she wrote is still, and even especially, relevant today.
Tom
Dec 05, 2020 added it
This book criticizes national accounts (e.g., GDP) for ignoring the value of unpaid labor and for ignoring environmental destruction. Its arguments have been influential in feminist economics and in discussions about improving or replacing GDP. Much of the book is still applicable to the modern era, though I suspect that more recent writings that encompass 1990–present progress (or lack thereof) would better serve people who are newly interested in learning about this topic.

The book's rhetoric
...more
Brian
The main ideas of this book are very important, but they don't require more than a couple of pages to communicate. Just check out this link and don't bother with the book itself: [http://www.unpac.ca/economy/historyec...] ...more
Amanda
Jul 06, 2016 rated it it was amazing
This is a total *must read*. It's one of the most compelling books that I've read about women and economics. It's written in a very accessible way and explains the chronic undervaluing of women's work in our economic world-view. Why aren't you reading it yet? ...more
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Marilyn Joy Waring, CNZM (born 7 October 1952), is a New Zealand feminist, a politician, an activist for female human rights and environmental issues, a development consultant and United Nations expert, an author and an academic, known as a principal founder of the discipline of feminist economics.

(from Wikipedia)

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