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Lasting Contribution: How to Think, Plan, and Act to Accomplish Meaningful Work
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Lasting Contribution: How to Think, Plan, and Act to Accomplish Meaningful Work

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3.41  ·  Rating details ·  41 Ratings  ·  12 Reviews
A powerful dose of wisdom in a concise package, Lasting Contribution is filled with profound and effective advice on how to make the kinds of contributions — to work, to organizations, to communities — that really matter. Drawing from such varied sources as Aristotle, Sun Tzu, Victor Frankl, and Confucius, this book marshals insights that touch on information theory, socio ...more
Paperback, 110 pages
Published August 28th 2007 by Agate B2
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Joe
Jun 03, 2009 rated it liked it
A great deal of thought went into this book and it really connected with me on how a contribution can last with out you even trying, if you are a lasting contributor.
Robert
Aug 22, 2008 rated it it was amazing
Waddington asserts that "lasting contributions are caused. Simply put, you cause a lasting contribution to happen. The problem is that the way people usually think about causality does not serve them well when it comes to thinking about taking action. " Waddington notes that some 2,300 years ago, Aristotle argued that it is useful to think in terms of four causes: material (i.e. of what a thing is made), efficient (i.e. how something is made), formal (i.e. what a thing is), and final (i.e. why a ...more
University of Chicago Magazine
Tad Waddington, AM'90, PhD'95
Author

From the author: "A powerful dose of wisdom in a concise package, Lasting Contribution is filled with profound and effective advice on how to make the kinds of contributions — to work, to organizations, to communities — that really matter. Drawing from such varied sources as Aristotle, Sun Tzu, Victor Frankl, and Confucius, this book marshals insights that touch on information theory, sociology, Zen, psychology, art history, management theory, and other fields.
...more
Byron
Jul 22, 2008 rated it it was ok
Shelves: goodlife
some people say you need to read this book multiple times. i'll try, but only because it is short. wanna know the answer to this book: read as much as you can, distill what you can, and watch the randy pausch "last lecture" on youtube. then go out and do something awesome. will comment if i reread.
Earon S.
Jun 20, 2008 rated it it was amazing
This book is a lasting contribution, synthesizing broad philosophical looks at human understanding and wisdom in an absence of dogma. I hope that this guidepost will be available and accessible for everyone who unknowingly searches for it. [How's that for inscrutable?] (-:
Katrina
Aug 07, 2008 rated it really liked it
Recommends it for: unitarian universalists, anyone looking to create a meaningful life
I read an excellent review of this book in the UU magazine and then met the author at UU family camp. It's a quick read and thought-provoking. There are a few sections I want to reread and then I plan to use it to actually plan out on paper some goals for myself.
Gabriel Fernandez
Aug 05, 2015 rated it it was ok
Poorly written. This book has more quotes than original work. While the author introduces many important concepts and quotes, he fails in explaining them and integrate them in a coherent whole.
If you take any English class, you will learn that you can not use a quote to explain another one.
Katie
Jan 22, 2009 added it
Not as linear as I would have liked
Karlen
Jan 16, 2013 rated it it was ok
I read this for work. Hard to be enthusiastic about that.
Josie
Jun 10, 2008 rated it did not like it
superficial and uninformative
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Tad Waddington says he achieved literacy while getting his MA from the University of Chicago’s Divinity School where he focused on the history of Chinese religions. He achieved numeracy while getting his PhD from the University of Chicago in Measurement, Evaluation and Statistical Analysis. He achieved efficacy as Accenture’s Director of Performance Measurement. As for achieving a legacy, well tha ...more
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