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Science & Faith: Friends or Foes?

4.07  ·  Rating details ·  102 ratings  ·  11 reviews
Many believers worry that science undermines the Christian faith. Instead of fearing scientific discovery, Jack Collins believes that Christians should delight in the natural world and study it. God's truth will stand against any challenge and will enrich the very scientific studies that we fear.

Collins first defines faith and science, shows their relation, and explains wh
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Paperback, 448 pages
Published October 15th 2003 by Crossway Books
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Average rating 4.07  · 
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Wade
Jul 30, 2014 rated it it was amazing
I deeply enjoyed this book. Collins, who has a PhD in Hebrew Linguistics from the University of Liverpool and a Masters degree in Computer Science and Systems Engineering from MIT weaves his love of science and his love of Scripture together in a very approachable manner. Because of Collins’ skill as an Old Testament scholar, he is able to methodically and clearly break down each passage of Scripture with which he deals.

After finishing the book, I would argue that this is presuppositional apolog
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E.
Dec 23, 2015 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: christianity, science
A great overview of issues related to faith, science, and everything in between. Collins is clearly making an effort to break big ideas down for a popular audience. While he states dislike for the way many philosophers tend to re-define words (I'm sure the philosophers would have a barbed rejoinder for this) he discusses philosophical topics with a clarity that I have not seen in any other work of this kind. He also draws from a variety of sources: Collins discusses the ideas of secular scientis ...more
Glenn Crouch
Dec 15, 2013 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: theology
The Author is a qualified Engineer and a qualified Theologian, thus means he knows about both fields, and you can see that in his approach. Rather then homing in on things that Science has gotten wrong, or make Christianity a slave to Science, we have strong views of both Science and Christianity - I like this as I have a Science Degree and am a Pastor :)

I would recommend this to Christians who want to know more about how Science fits in, as well as to sceptics of Christianity. The Author takes
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Joey Dutcher
Dec 08, 2020 rated it really liked it
A friend from church recommended I read this book to better understand his (and the authors) understanding of the creation narrative in Genesis. Therefore I read that chapter, and the preceding chapters that built up his thinking.

Interesting read.
Joshua
Sep 16, 2020 rated it it was ok
A reasonably argued basic introduction from a conservative viewpoint.
C.C. Strachan
May 25, 2020 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Great book in helping you to understand origin of life questions.
Brian Watson
Sep 02, 2014 rated it really liked it
Jack Collins is well-equipped to write a book on how science and faith are related. He holds two degrees from MIT, and a Master of Divinity and a PhD in Hebrew. Collins's goal was to write a book that is free of technical jargon. The book has many positive features: the author covers a lot of ground; he writes very clearly; and he is persuasive. On the negative side, the book has a very peculiar system of notes and citations: instead of using footnotes or numbered end notes, there is an appendix ...more
Steve Walker
Dec 14, 2011 rated it did not like it
Shelves: science-religion
Really would like to assign no stars to this disorganized mess. I understand what the author is attempting to do, however, his editor failed in the task of shaping and cutting where needed. There are much better books on the topic.
Peter Yoshonis
Sep 08, 2012 rated it really liked it
Collins gives a theological perspective to the conversation about faith and science. I most enjoyed his reflection of multiple views of the creation story and what it means to be image bearers of God. Also liked the chapter on cosmology and geology as it relates to the age of the earth.
Steve
Oct 21, 2014 rated it really liked it
Enlightening!
Steve Herreid
Feb 18, 2015 rated it really liked it
Loved this book.
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C. JOHN COLLINS (PhD, University of Liverpool) is professor of Old Testament at Covenant Theological Seminary in St Louis. With degrees from MIT and Faith Evangelical Lutheran Seminary, he pursues such research interests as Hebrew and Greek grammar, science and faith, and biblical theology. He is the author of The God of Miracles.

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Twists, turns, red herrings, the usual suspects: These books have it all...and more. If you love mysteries and thrillers, get ready for dozens...
143 likes · 33 comments
“Do not waste time bothering whether you “love” your neighbour; act as if you did. As soon as we do this we find one of the great secrets. When you are behaving as if you loved someone, you will presently come to love him.” 0 likes
“I think we can also see the wisdom in the biblical material on bodily position in prayer and worship: your posture affects your attitude. Hence worshipers kneel, stand, raise their hands, lie prostrate. What is Christian public worship? It’s when the Maker of heaven and earth welcomes his blood-bought people into his presence, to love them and give himself to them in a way that’s not available anywhere else, to grant them a taste of what their souls yearn for. How can I give the full range of response to such an inexpressible privilege unless my whole self is involved? For example: when we confess our sins together in worship and ask for forgiveness, we ought to be humble suppliants. I know I’m usually not. Perhaps the way to begin bringing my soul into line is to make my body kneel.” 0 likes
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