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To Have and Have Not

3.56  ·  Rating details ·  23,868 ratings  ·  1,456 reviews
I don't know who made the laws, but I know there ain't no law that you got to go hungry.

Harry Morgan was hard, the classic Hemingway hero. He had to be hard, rum-running and man-running from Cuba to the Forida Keys in the Depression. He ran risks, too, from stray coastguard bullets and sudden doublecrosses. But it was the only way he could keep his boat, keep his
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Paperback, 184 pages
Published 1994 by Arrow Books (first published 1937)
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Russel Chiodo Not. At. All.

William Faulkner wrote the final screenplay. It was heavily edited to soften the characters due to Roosevelt era film regulations. Also,…more
Not. At. All.

William Faulkner wrote the final screenplay. It was heavily edited to soften the characters due to Roosevelt era film regulations. Also, the location was changed to French Martinique due to the US Good Neighbor Policy regarding Latin American nations. This completely changed the movie to more of a story about subverting Vichy France than being a smuggler trying support a family. I actually like the movie a lot. Bogey and Bacall are at their absolute best. The story is fun. But it's not the deeply touching, soul-rattling look at what humans will do to one another to hold or improve their position in class hierarchy that the book is.

Read the book. And for god sakes, do not watch the film in place of reading the book for a school project. You'll be slaughtered. (less)
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Average rating 3.56  · 
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 ·  23,868 ratings  ·  1,456 reviews


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Will Byrnes
Dec 22, 2012 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction
This is not at all the Nazi romp of Bogie and Bacall fame. There might be some external similarities, but they seem fleeting. If you put your lips together to whistle here, the likelihood would be that it would be to warn someone that the police were coming. Life can be tough in The Conch Republic.

Harry Morgan is a hard man in a hard time. He owns and operates his own fishing boat, out of Key West, catering to those who Have and want an ocean-going adventure. When Harry is stiffed out of almost
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Ahmad Sharabiani
615. To Have And Have Not, Ernest Hemingway
To Have and Have Not is a novel by Ernest Hemingway (publ. 1937) about Harry Morgan, a fishing boat captain out of Key West, Florida. The novel depicts Harry as an essentially good man, who is forced by dire economic forces beyond his control into the black-market activity of running contraband between Cuba and Florida. A wealthy fishing charter customer (one of the "Have's") tricks Harry by slipping away without paying after a three-week fishing trip,
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J.L.   Sutton
Nov 27, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Well before the midway point, Ernest Hemingway’s To Have and Have Not turns into a different sort of book. At least, that’s the way it felt to me. It begins as the very straightforward story of an out of luck ship captain who turns to crime in order to support his family. Nothing is that simple in Hemingway. While connecting to the current political and economic climate (which included an incipient revolution in Cuba), Hemingway transforms this personal tragedy into something infinitely more ...more
Malcolm
Jan 05, 2009 rated it did not like it  ·  review of another edition
Meh.

It starts very strongly -- good character development, definite Hemingway commentary tone -- lots of Hemingway Southern Hemisphere fun in Cuba.

But midway -- he just sort of wanders off and starts pointing his Hemingway at anything that moves. He introduces secondary and tertiary characters with incredible detail, but with no discernible purpose.

It's not one of his better books, and ends leaving you wondering how much better it would have been if the writing from about the second third on was
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Brad
If you've never read Hemingway, this isn't the book for you. If you don't like experimentation, this isn't the book for you. If you're turned off by violence, this isn't the book for you. If you're an opponent of socialism, this isn't the book for you. If you want happy endings, this isn't the book for you.

If, however, you have dabbled in Hemingway and you want a challenge, this is the book for you. If you dig experimental literature, then this is the book for you. If you can stomach violence or
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Algernon (Darth Anyan)

"a man ... ain't got no ... hasn't got any ... can't really ... isn't any way out. No matter how ... a man alone ... ain't got no bloody chance."
Harry Morgan


A novel of the Depression Era, To Have and Have Not follows the struggle of Harry Morgan to make ends meet, to live a decent life. He is a boat owner sailing the waters between Cuba and Key West, renting out to rich tourists lookinh for the thrill of big fish chasing. The novel opens with a spectacular gunfight in front of a bar in
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Fiona MacDonald
I feel slightly less guilty knowing that Hemingway himself thought this was the worst book he had ever written, but even so, I must be missing something major because I found the prose dull, stilted, unemotional and simply boring. I couldn't connect with any of the characters and that was a big problem. A couple of pages were of interest, but overall I was desperate to finish and celebrating when I did.
Ted Hovey
Jan 07, 2016 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Hemingway is still my favorite writer. I've enjoyed all of his books, and I've learned from his style - minimal use of adverbs - maximum use of one-syllable words - clarity of expression - all of that and more. So why did I rate this book down, as 4 stars instead of 5? I had a hard time cheering for Harry, a criminal and a killer. I understand that Hemingway wrote in the "modernist" mode. That is to say, there are no happy endings in Hemingway's books. That is true in this book, for sure. Still, ...more
Brad
This book is widely considered one of Hemingways worst, and there's even a tale floating around that he told director Howard Hawks that he thought it was a pile of shit. It's not, though. It's neither his worst nor a pile of shit. Nor is it his best. But there is much to admire in To Have and Have Not, and those things are amplified by Will Patton's award worthy vocal performance in the audio version.

Patton's quiet, simmering rhythm, and his hushed tones -- even in the most violent moments --
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Steve
Mar 09, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction
I'm all over the map on how to rate this one. It's better than 3 stars, but probably not worth 4 (but I'll round up). I was surprised to find that this was Hemingway's first "novel" in eight years. Is it a novel? On one hand, you could probably view this as a collection of short stories and a novella, with the connective thread being that Middled Aged Man of the Sea: Harry Morgan. But there are connective threads here (the Depression being the main one) where the reader can discern a beginning ...more
Julie Christine
Florida Keys. 1937. Harry Morgan, husband to a former prostitute, disappointed father, erstwhile deep sea fishing guide. Broke. Desperate. Surrounded by wasted, depressed, angry, hopeless characters. Welcome to Hemingway.

How can a protagonist who refers to blacks as "niggers", who writes his own moral code with little regard for law or ethics, who regrets his daughters, and who has a dismal outlook on life even on his best days get under your skin? How can a writer, whose phrases are bleak,
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Earl Gray
Sep 04, 2012 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: fiction
This was my third time reading it. The first was in 1999, borrowed from the local library when I read/re-read a lot of his books for his 100th birthday. The second was when I bought a copy with a Border's gift certificate that my wife had given me in 2007. This time was when I brought it with me to read during a trip to Key West for my birthday because he wrote it there and it takes place there.

The highlight of reading it this time was reading it in our Key West hotel room on the Sunday that
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Zeek
Mar 04, 2011 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Considered Hemmingway’s worst- To Have and Have Not is almost shocking to read with modern eyes. Either he was a racist pig- likely; or he was documenting the sad state of racial affairs in the 1930’s when this was written- unlikely- but true, however inadvertedly. Even if I give him the benefit of the doubt, he probably was showing his ass as well.

The first section of this decidedly short novel is told from Harry Morgan’s POV. I found the first section to be the most engaging, although this is
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Emily Luba
Oh I really wanted to love this book! I'm very aware that Hemingway is a literary genius and writes fabulous novels, but this book had me scratching my head. Basically I could summarize it in one sentence "A man drives his boat between Florida and Cuba and runs into violent and illegal happenings." And that. Is. It. I was really looking forward to reading Hemingway, as I never have before, and he is my Dad's favourite author but I just didn't get it the point of this novel. I'm not sure if there ...more
James Tingle

Maybe not his best (that I've read- not got through them all yet) but still pretty good I thought when I gave it a go a while back. Harry Morgan, the main character, is memorable and is one of those gruff, snarling, no nonsense, messed up characters you used to see in the old movies. Not someone you'd want round for dinner maybe- he'd probably punch a guest and then turn over the table- but great to read about from the safety of a comfy armchair. It all starts quite slowly and then really heats
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Quirkyreader
This book is rather difficult to review.

Granted, it was written in 1937 and speech patterns and certain words were acceptable at that time. But the way this story reads offended me right from the start. I had a hard time with it and I was going to just put it away and not finish. But, the completist that I am, made me finish it.

So a word of a caution, the language of this book is rather off putting.
Kathryn
Apr 23, 2011 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: classics
The last Hemingway book I read was The Garden of Eden. To Have and Have Not has made me appreciate that last book a bit more. Comparing the books is unfair. Both are extremely different. Eden was unique. This book felt predictable, chaotic, and unrelateable. It almost felt as though it were two rough drafts thrown together. I did not like the turn of the structure near the end. I did not like the dialogue or the characters. I had high hopes after the first chapter. Even though I did not like ...more
Mahdie
Feb 03, 2014 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Realy high literally style.
With alot of decent descriptions.
But the reader would be missed to infer whats the main lesson because the author had tried not to judge and say his own ideas in this book.The main thing that I have learned from this book was that love can cause everything.Sometimes people who loves sb does anything to make (in this book the t main character`s wife)satisfied.That caused his death.And how his wife could survive living without him...
کتابی پر از توصیفات ساده و پربار از
...more
Claire
As allways I enjoyed Hemingway’s writing. This is a very recognizable and typical Hemingway in some ways. At the same time, it is a book to read a few times: the story is not very coherent, there is a lot of shifting of POV, and the tone of the story is very different in the first part vs the second part.
Also, I think Hemingway is a real male chauvenist:-) But I can forgive him, if I see him as a child of his time. But I’m allways prepared when reading his books for the typical tough guy stuff.

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Carol Storm
I see why people say this is Hemingway's worst novel. It's not just the revolting racial epithets scattered everywhere like rat turds. It's the unintentionally hilarious dialogue between super-macho Harry and his big blonde, blowzy wife. ("I get excited just looking at you Harry. Do it to me again, that's all I want. That's all I care about!") On the other hand, there are some good gun fights and interesting background on Florida in the Depression. And the opening chapter, where the rich tourist ...more
Daren
Published in 1937, this book contains three stand alone, but interconnected stories, all revolving around the same character - Harry Morgan. The first two stories are very short, and were originally published in magazines, the third is novella length.

The stories are very nautical - those with an interest in boats will take more from the detailed boat descriptions than others. The writing style varies from story to story, as does the narration which doesn't remain consistent throughout -
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Aaron Million
Nov 07, 2018 rated it it was ok  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: classics
This book is sort of a mess. I am not really sure quite what to think of it. Hemingway alternates from first person narrative of one character, to a narrator, to first person narrative of someone else, then back to narration. It is sort of confusing. The scene of action also shifts, adding to the confusion. Some of the novel takes place in Havana, some of it in Key West, and some of it out on the Gulf in between the two locations.

The ostensible main character is Harry Morgan, who really comes
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Anne  (Booklady) Molinarolo
I can see Papa walking the cat walk leading to his his studio. By 1937 he was growing tired of Pauline. Their marriage was on the rocks and Hemingway resented her money. He did question the rich and their attitudes somewhat, but his feelings about the rich was really about Pauline. He enjoyed his money. He thought To Have and Have Not was shit and really didn't care how Hollywood treated this small book. And Hollywood did treat the book differently. The Becall and Bogart movie was nothing like ...more
Ben
Apr 27, 2011 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: american-lit
No matter how a man alone ain't got no bloody fucking chance.


Don't stare at it too long. Hemingway can write a little better than this crude assembly of improper grammar, this frayed string of incomprehensible nonsense. I know this, despite certain times of doubt while reading his works. But in To Have and Have Not, all the contemptible characteristics of Hemingway's style work together seamlessly and, more importantly, with profound effect. I nearly glimpsed the genius which the literary world
...more
Israel Drazin
Feb 25, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Ernest Hemingway (1899-1961), best-known for his 1952 book “The Old Man and the Sea,” winner of the Pulitzer Prize in 1953 and the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954, wrote “To Have and Have Not,” a 174-page book about a fisherman Harry Morgan during the depression in three parts. While a film was made which was called “To Have and Have Not,” and the main character in the film is a man called Harry Morgan who owns a fishing boat, the film is otherwise in no way like Hemingway’s book.
In the film,
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Heidi Burkhart
Jul 15, 2018 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
I fell in love with this book! Not one of Hemingway's better known books, but I am not sure why because I thought it was beautiful in a rough, real way. As Harry Morgan's luck dwindles we get to know him, and his wife, Marie through several sets of eyes in the book. My favorite scene (not a spoiler) was when Marie was remembering the first time she had her hair dyed blonde in Havana. Each word drew me in and in until I couldn't imagine a more beautiful passage. Exquisite.
Morgan
I wouldn't call this the worst Hemingway book ever written, but out of the ones I've read I wasn't a fan. I had bought this book in college for a Hemingway course I took, but we never got around reading it. Six years later, I finally remembered I had this book and decided to read it. Besides the main character using the "n" word a little too much for my case, I didn't like the set up for this book. It got a little confusing for Hemingway's short and to the point style. With that said, it wasn't ...more
Geoff Smith
Apr 22, 2019 rated it liked it  ·  review of another edition
Shelves: novels, crime
Hemingway writes brilliantly - and there are some amazing scenes in this book. It starts great!

For me the ending feels disjointed and not thought out and sometimes I feel like Hemingway is more interested in being Hemingway than in pursuing a specific artistic intent.

Still I did enjoy this book, just not quite as much as I thought I might.
Squire
A man. . . One man alone ain't got. No man alone now. . . No matter how a man alone ain't got no bloody fucking chance.

This is the summation of what Harry Morgan, the titular "Have Not" of the title, has learned in his lifetime.

Essentially, two short stories and one novella concerning Harry Morgan: a hard drinking, hard loving, fishing boat captain forced by dire circumstances into running contraband (mostly alcohol and mercenaries) between Key West, FL and Cuba. He is a bruiser of a man: big,
...more
Kyle
Jun 17, 2013 rated it really liked it  ·  review of another edition
To Have and Have Not is a tale of discontentment, death, and desperation in the Depression-Era Florida Keys. Definitely one of Hemingway's more detached and disjointed novels, but told in typical style with a backdrop he knows intimately. He wrote it after registering distaste from critics and readers alike that he was writing gallivanting tales of international playboyhood while the country was in deep socioeconomic turmoil. They called him out of touch. He responded with this novel. ...more
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Ernest Miller Hemingway was an American author and journalist. His economical and understated style had a strong influence on 20th-century fiction, while his life of adventure and his public image influenced later generations. Hemingway produced most of his work between the mid-1920s and the mid-1950s, and won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954. He published seven novels, six short story ...more
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