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Time Loops: Precognition, Retrocausation, and the Unconscious

really liked it 4.00  ·  Rating details ·  22 ratings  ·  4 reviews
Paperback, 447 pages
Published October 19th 2018 by Anomalist Books
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Dan Sumption
Sep 05, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Oh my, this is a fun, rum book! It sets out to demonstrate that retrocausation - i.e. future stimuli causing past events - is a real phenomenon, and that it is responsible for precognitive dreams and a whole host of other strangenesses. Throughout the book Wargo overwhelms the reader with examples of just such strange experiences, while anticipating the objections - including hindsight bias, availability bias, and file-drawer bias - that prevents these from being treated as serious scientific ev ...more
Chris Harris
Dec 29, 2018 rated it did not like it
Some interesting ideas that are let down by the Von Daniken school of argument: make an outlandish suggestion as a possibility, then spend the rest of the book writing on the assumption that it's true. Claiming that the law of parsimony (the simplest explanation is usually the right one, a.k.a. Occam's Razor) supports your assertion, when it quite clearly doesn't, is unforgivable.

The second law of thermodynamics requires the arrow of time to point in one direction; Wargo doesn't really come up
...more
Dennis Merimsky
Nov 04, 2019 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition

How important is the future is to us and how does it influence our present? Maeterlinck asks us:"Do we not all spend the greater part of our lives under the shadow of an event that has not yet come to pass?"
What a great read this is. Eric Wargo's book on time loops and the unconscious is undoubtedly intriguing and thought provoking. This is a bold attempt to build a framework of "retrocausation" for a whole range of issues which most mainstream scientists have a hard time explaining: premo
...more
Taylor
Mar 08, 2019 rated it it was amazing
Synopsis: Eric makes a bold hypothesis in this book, simply put all forms of parapsychology are a byproduct of our brain’s ability to see in an extra dimension, both backwards and forwards in time. He backs this up in many ways and even asserts ways of strengthening this theory which are in the works. The book is broken into three parts:
The first section is an introduction to the topic, in this section Eric introduces his idea and provides some evidence for his solution. His evidence are anecdo
...more
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“Our element is eternal immaturity. The things that we think, feel, and say today will necessarily seem foolish to our grandchildren; so it would surely be better to forestall this now, and treat them as if they were foolish already… — Witold Gombrowicz, Ferdydurke (1937)” 0 likes
“Thiotimoline is an organic molecule, which means that it contains a carbon atom bonded to other atoms. Carbon forms four such valence bonds, positioned at each point of a tetrahedron. What the Soviet chemists discovered was that the carbon atom in thiotimoline is somewhat different than other carbon atoms: Two of its carbon valence bonds extend across the temporal dimension, not a spatial dimension. It means that one of its bonds is slightly in the molecule’s past, and another is in the molecule’s future. This accounts for thiotimoline’s curious property of dissolving slightly before water touches it.” 0 likes
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