Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.
Start by marking “Knowledge and Its Place in Nature” as Want to Read:
Knowledge and Its Place in Nature
Enlarge cover
Rate this book
Clear rating
Open Preview

Knowledge and Its Place in Nature

3.94  ·  Rating details ·  18 Ratings  ·  1 Review
Hilary Kornblith argues for a naturalistic approach to investigating knowledge. Knowledge, he explains, is a feature of the natural world, and so should be investigated using scientific methods. He offers an account of knowledge derived from the science of animal behavior, and defends this against its philosophical rivals. This controversial and refreshingly original book ...more
Paperback, 189 pages
Published January 6th 2005 by Clarendon Press (first published August 1st 2002)
More Details... edit details

Friend Reviews

To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

Reader Q&A

To ask other readers questions about Knowledge and Its Place in Nature, please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about Knowledge and Its Place in Nature

Community Reviews

(showing 1-46)
Rating details
Sort: Default
|
Filter
Joshua Nomen-Mutatio
I was reminded through various events to pick this up sooner than later.
Mike Michaels
rated it really liked it
Apr 01, 2015
Kate Devitt
rated it liked it
Jun 01, 2014
SweetCuppinCakes
rated it really liked it
Dec 05, 2016
Isseicreek
rated it liked it
Jan 17, 2011
Frederick Allen
rated it liked it
Mar 08, 2014
Kento
rated it liked it
Aug 05, 2015
Matt
rated it it was amazing
May 29, 2014
Ben
rated it really liked it
Oct 18, 2017
Leigh Jackson
rated it liked it
Mar 23, 2017
Serena Mccracken
rated it it was amazing
May 28, 2015
Jonathan Reibsamen
rated it liked it
Mar 07, 2007
Laura
rated it really liked it
Jan 24, 2011
einfuhlung
rated it really liked it
Sep 07, 2008
Carrie Ann
rated it it was amazing
May 02, 2013
Nick Nguyen
rated it it was amazing
Apr 20, 2014
Matt
rated it it was amazing
Sep 27, 2007
Kristoffer
rated it really liked it
Sep 11, 2007
Shannon
rated it really liked it
Mar 07, 2013
Jimmy
marked it as to-read
Oct 10, 2008
abcdefg
marked it as to-read
May 11, 2010
Defaceo
marked it as to-read
Jun 13, 2011
Simon
added it
Feb 09, 2012
Themis
added it
Apr 06, 2012
Leo Horovitz
marked it as to-read
Sep 11, 2012
Shawn
marked it as to-read
Nov 24, 2012
Roy
added it
Jan 21, 2013
Frank Spencer
marked it as to-read
Apr 23, 2013
Rob
marked it as to-read
May 31, 2013
Charoo Iyer
marked it as to-read
Dec 29, 2015
Natalie
marked it as to-read
Apr 04, 2016
Ben
marked it as to-read
Jun 03, 2016
Mahfoudh Ebakar
marked it as to-read
Aug 24, 2016
Taylor Madigan
marked it as to-read
Aug 29, 2016
BookDB
marked it as to-read
Sep 18, 2016
Gaetano Venezia
marked it as to-read
Feb 18, 2017
Ali
marked it as to-read
Mar 26, 2017
Codi
marked it as to-read
Mar 31, 2017
Hélio Steven
marked it as to-read
Aug 25, 2017
Nathan Byrd
marked it as to-read
Dec 30, 2017
m pav
marked it as to-read
Jan 22, 2018
Coincidentia oppositorum
marked it as to-read
Jan 31, 2018
Chris
marked it as to-read
Mar 06, 2018
There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Be the first to start one »
Hilary Kornblith is an American Professor of philosophy at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA, and one of contemporary epistemology's most prominent proponents of naturalized epistemology. Kornblith received his B.A. from SUNY Buffalo in 1975 and his PhD from Cornell University in 1980, where he studied under Sydney Shoemaker and Richard Boyd. Before coming to University of Massachusetts ...more
More about Hilary Kornblith
“Intuition must be taken seriously in the absence of substantial theoretical understanding, but once such theoretical understanding begins to take shape, prior intuitive judgments carry little weight unless they have been endorsed by the progress of theory. The greater one's theoretical understanding, the less weight one may assign to untutored judgment.

All this applies equally well to the case of appeals to intuition in philosophy. We sometimes hear philosophers speak of some intuitions as 'merely' driven by theory, and thus to be ignored. While it is certainly true that judgments driven by bad theories are not to be taken seriously, the solution is not to try to return to some pure state of theory independent judgment, before the fall, as it were; rather the solution is to get a better theory. Intuition in the absence of theory does not count for nothing, especially if no credible theory is available. But this is not to award high marks to intuitive judgment before the arrival of successful theory, let alone after, when the initially low value of such judgment drops still lower.”
0 likes
More quotes…