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Beyond Charity: The Call to Christian Community Development

4.13  ·  Rating details ·  218 ratings  ·  19 reviews
John Perkins calls churches to leave behind old political assumptions and apply serious biblical ministry to urban problems. This new vision rejects easy answers, stressing Christian community.
Paperback, 192 pages
Published July 1st 1993 by Baker Books
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4.13  · 
Rating details
 ·  218 ratings  ·  19 reviews


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Will Osgood
May 24, 2017 rated it it was amazing  ·  review of another edition
Love love love, 10/10 recommended

Dr. John Perkins is a living legend. He's the closest thing there is to an expert in Christian Community Development. This book is centered on the Gospel & our response to it. What a blessing it is to hear from this Godly man.
Peyton Welch
Jul 08, 2018 rated it it was amazing
Perhaps the most impressive part of this book is that it was first published in 1993. Without constantly remembering that date, the content would lead me to believe that it was written this year. The concepts are timeless and clear. Twenty-five years later, the material in this book is as needed as ever.

John Perkins is the father of the Christian Community Development movement, and in a way, this book is its constitution. It will prove to be useful to anyone seeking to serve the urban poor in
...more
Nelson
Dec 10, 2008 rated it it was amazing
The Call to Christian Community Development. “It’s time for the whole church, yes, the whole church, to take a whole gospel on a whole mission to the whole world… It is time for us to prove that the purpose of the gospel is to reconcile alienated people to God and to each other, across racial, cultural, social, and economic barriers.” Not everyone is called to move to the inner city to minister there, but everyone is called to have a heart for its hurting people. This book shows us how to be sen ...more
Clara Roberts
Jun 27, 2014 rated it really liked it
This was a very good book to tell the Christian how to put feet to their Christianity. My only problem with the book was that he did not stress that good works does not assure the believer a place in heaven. Salvation is for the believer who accepts the work Jesus did on the cross and not any good works that a person does.This is a good book to tell the social gospel story. I could not go live in a ghetto to share the gospel with unbelievers but I admire those who make this choice.
Dave Mankin
Feb 28, 2007 rated it it was amazing
my favorite quote from this book is: "take the risk, swallow doubt, and move forward."
Richard
Feb 15, 2017 rated it really liked it
Wonderful book. Although 20 years old, this book's recommendations are fresh and relevant. Dr. Perkins is a Christian dedicated to helping the urban poor. He has long experience and much wisdom to share. Inspiring.
Adam Ross
John Perkins was horrifically beaten during the civil rights era and left for dead. Now he works as a laborer for racial reconciliation, and is a leader of the modern urban community development movement. This wasn't his best book, but it was in some ways helpful. He rightly criticizes private charity as something appealed to mostly for the sake of the giver, something to appease the conscience while preventing more radical economic and structural changes from taking place that would actually he ...more
Joel
Oct 06, 2008 rated it really liked it
Recommends it for: everyone.
Shelves: christian, social
Perkins does it again. His simple prose and transparent nature come through his pages and speak to your soul. He clearly lays out more in depth ideas and practices of Christian community development and social justice. He has the ability to be both radical and conservative without being purely either one at any given time. His encouragement in this book is, as the title says, to go beyond charity and continually commit yourself to assistance, not simple drive-by charity. He beckons the reader, a ...more
Brian
Mar 08, 2015 rated it liked it
Perkins opens this book by recalling the aftermath of the acquittal of four white officers after the beating of Rodney King in LA. The year was 1992. Fast forward to 2015. We as a nation have been watching Ferguson, MO as people have responded to the acquittal of a white officer who killed a young black male named Michael Brown. Perkins believe these are spiritual issues that need spiritual solutions. Perkins words are just as timely today as they were in 1993.
Quincy
Jan 21, 2017 rated it really liked it
A must read for all Christians, especially those concerned with confronting poverty and serving and developing under-served communities.

Challenges conventional notions of giving ("charity") and replaces ineffective, self-aggrandizing, and marginalizing practices with a more genuine investment, personal involvement and holistic solutions.

For theological conservatives concerned with a so-called "social gospel", Perkins provides a balanced theological approach to social action.
Aldra
Mar 16, 2008 rated it it was ok
Who doesn't love John Perkins? The man is amazing, and I've had the opportunity to hear him speak several times. Having seen him in action, I'm fully aware that he is not the author of this book, and that lack of integrity disturbs me. I understand that the ghost writing profession is a lucrative career for many, but at the very least, the supposed author should make a point to note assistance.
Jed
Mar 21, 2008 rated it really liked it
Almost done. This book is a real challenge to the complacency, hippocracy and indolence of the American Church. Perkins points out many of the problems and legacies that the Church has to deal with in order to be an effective positive force in our society. If you find yourself reflexively disagreeing it may be because you are scared of the implications if Perkins is right.
Corey
Jun 11, 2014 rated it really liked it
A great book about moving from charity to empowerment from a guy who knows what he's talking about. Make sure you read it all the way through to get to the part about all the adversity Perkins has endured in his work...it will leave you in awe at his enduring sense of hope. This book has a little more abstract theology than I was expecting, but it all applies to the topic.
Angela
Jul 13, 2010 rated it it was amazing
loved it loved it loved it - about how and why we can and should build back up our forgotten communities
David Bennett
Feb 08, 2014 rated it it was amazing
This is a great book for understanding community development and the real need to give of yourself and your pocketbook.
Beth
Dec 13, 2007 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: christian
Incredibly to the point and clear on the heart of those in urban ministry and knowing if you're called to it. Puts feet to Jesus
Nathan
mission year book
RF
Jan 18, 2008 marked it as to-read
A classic work in the field of community development -my husband's field.
Danny Summerlin
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Mar 01, 2014
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Martin Willms
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Sarah Gowing
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Dr. John M. Perkins is the founder and president emeritus of the John and Vera Mae Perkins Foundation and cofounder of Christian Community Development Association. He has served in advisory roles under five U.S. presidents, is one of the leading evangelical voices to come out of the American civil rights movement, and is an author and international speaker on issues of reconciliation, leadership, ...more
“In America, education and quality of life are directly related. Lacking a good education means lacking, among other things, access to the very doorway that leads to a wholesome life-style. Education is not a luxury in modern American society—it is essential for survival.” 4 likes
“The difference between relocation and gentrification is motive, plain and simple. When we decide to move into an inner-city neighborhood we should always ask ourselves the question, Is this good for my new neighbors? Moving into inner-city neighborhoods for merely selfish reasons with no regard as to how it will affect the community residents will probably eventually do harm to your neighbors.” 2 likes
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