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Meet a Jerk, Get to Work, How to Write Villains and the Occasional Hero

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3.37  ·  Rating details ·  107 ratings  ·  17 reviews
Kindle Edition, 9 pages
Published (first published October 23rd 2011)
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3.37  · 
Rating details
 ·  107 ratings  ·  17 reviews


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Anna Erishkigal
I got this little short story for free on Amazon kindle. It's basically a reprint of an article from some writing journal or other about where the author finds inspiration for the villains she then knocks off in her stories and the heinous circumstances of their deaths, but it is information I haven't encountered before and it's opened my eyes for a whole new avenue for creating mayhem in my own novels. Thanks for the freebie!
Sarah Spelbring
Sep 05, 2018 rated it liked it
I really liked the though processes behind the idea of this book. This is plot solver, or even story if you think about it hard enough.

The basic idea thrown out in this little ebook by author Jaqi Girdner, is that there are Murders and Murder Victims for your story plots in everyday life. I'll give an example. Say that someone cuts you off badly in heavy traffic. That someone's an butthead, and now your murder victim. That's it in a very basic way, but you can take it further. Bullys, generic je
...more
Leeza Wilson
Nov 11, 2018 rated it it was amazing
I loved this book. It's a short read but has some valuable information for writers that are trying to formulate their villains, or jerks, and victims. The interesting twist is that the jerks are the ones that get murdered due to the evil behavior they inflict on others and the victims are the ones who strike back against the jerks. She gives some good advice on how to create these characters from observing people around you. If you're a mystery/suspense/thriller writer in need of some inspiratio ...more
Karen Byrum
Sep 05, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Good info!

Not a full length book...but an article. Very interesting. Finding villains in everyday life, even strangers on the street. A quick and useful read for beginning writers as well as veterans.
Aimee
Jul 25, 2017 rated it it was amazing
Shelves: kindle-books
Short and sweet

It's one writers process on how she comes up with her characters and plot. It is not an in depth analysis of anything. Interesting look into the mind of a murder, oops. I mean writer.
Justin Pyfrom
Feb 26, 2017 rated it it was amazing
A killer advice

I'm not one for mystery novels but that doesn't mean it didn't teach me anything. Writers from all genres can take something from this piece and reengineer it for their desired genre. I'm surely am.
Lauren
Jun 26, 2012 rated it liked it
I appreciated the tips on finding villains in your everyday life. Jaqueline Girdner introduced an interesting approach to finding murderers and their victims. The novel summed up to revenge killing. If you meet someone who is "unpleasant" or has wronged you or a friend in some way, they could easily be your inspiration for a bad guy. She offers some other insight to how she goes about plotting murders and finding murder weapons, I appreciate any published author's insight.
This was a free eBook,
...more
Graham Downs
Jan 17, 2013 rated it it was amazing
I simply adored this little article!

I don't want to steal Ms Girdner's thunder, but it's basically about observation. It's about watching and listening to real people in real situations around you and drawing your inspiration from them, specifically to write murder mysteries, but really it's applicable to any genre.

The article really gets the creative juices flowing. I might just consider writing a murder mystery at some point!
Suzie Quint
Sep 03, 2012 rated it really liked it
This is not a full length book. More of an essay, but it was free on Amazon (and still is as I write this.) The author writes mysteries and that's the focus of this article. While it's not exhaustive on the subject by any means, it does stimulate thought about characters, methods, and settings and so is worth the price (free) and the little bit of time it takes to read. Thus the 4 stars (since I'm rating it for what it intends to be.)
James Marsh
Jul 17, 2012 rated it really liked it
Short and sweet - this is more of a blog post than a novel, but still quite a few helpful insights into the writing process.

Some of the themes she covers:

What makes a good motivation/murderer?
What makes a good victim?
What makes a good location/weapon?
How can everyday experiences influence and inspire stories?
Terry Cohoe
May 10, 2013 rated it it was amazing
This is a fairly short instructional book on how to write mystery novels. I found it simple but definitely worthwhile to read. A quick read with great tips. This is the second time I've read and I was able to glean magic from it both times.
Fly
Jun 04, 2012 rated it it was ok
Shelves: 2012
Good, but not what I was looking for. I thought this was going to be more on the lines of creating a good villain, but it was more along the lines of how the author found inspiration in the people and things around her.
Mark
Aug 12, 2013 added it
fun, but crazy short.
Hildegart
Sep 27, 2013 rated it really liked it
Shelves: kindle
I enjoyed reading the author's way of finding and creating villains. It is short, but it gives you a way to approach writing in a villain.
SweetSweeede
Entertaining and inspiring article.
eclecticire
Mar 08, 2014 rated it it was amazing
Has some good ideas to help a novice get started.
Richard Woods
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aka Claire Daniels

Jaki Girdner lives, works, practices tai chi, and eats her vegetables in Marin County, California, along with her favourite computer peripheral, Famous Spouse Gregory Booi.

Series:
* Kate Jasper