Vagabonding Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel by Rolf Potts
17,522 ratings, 3.93 average rating, 1,028 reviews
Open Preview
Vagabonding Quotes Showing 1-30 of 67
“The value of your travels does not hinge on how many stamps you have in your passport when you get home -- and the slow nuanced experience of a single country is always better than the hurried, superficial experience of forty countries.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“Work is when you confront the problems you might otherwise be tempted to run away from”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“Thus, the question of how and when to start vagabonding is not really a question at all. Vagabonding starts now. Even if the practical reality of travel is still months or years away, vagabonding begins the moment you stop making excuses, start saving money, and begin to look at maps with the narcotic tingle of possibility. From here, the reality of vagabonding comes into sharper focus as you adjust your worldview and begin to embrace the exhilarating uncertainty that true travel promises.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“The simple willingness to improvise is more vital, in the long run, than research.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“Money, of course, is still needed to survive, but time is what you need to live. So, save what little money you possess to meet basic survival requirements, but spend your time lavishly in order to create the life values that make the fire worth the candle. Dig?”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“In this way, we end up spending (as Thoreau put it) “the best part of one’s life earning money in order to enjoy a questionable liberty during the least valuable part of it.” We’d love to drop all and explore the world outside, we tell ourselves, but the time never seems right. Thus, given an unlimited amount of choices, we make none. Settling into our lives, we get so obsessed with holding on to our domestic certainties that we forget why we desired them in the first place.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“having an adventure is sometimes just a matter of going out and allowing things to happen in a strange and amazing new environment—not so much a physical challenge as a psychic one.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“For first-time vagabonders, this can be one of the hardest travel lessons to grasp, since it will seem that there are so many amazing sights and experiences to squeeze in. You must keep in mind, however, that the whole point of long-term travel is having the time to move deliberately through the world. Vagabonding is about not merely reallotting a portion of your life for travel but rediscovering the entire concept of time. At home, you’re conditioned to get to the point and get things done, to favor goals and efficiency over moment-by-moment distinction. On the road, you learn to improvise your days, take a second look at everything you see, and not obsess over your schedule.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“Vagabonding is an attitude—a friendly interest in people, places, and things that makes a person an explorer in the truest, most vivid sense of the word. Vagabonding is not a lifestyle, nor is it a trend. It’s just an uncommon way of looking at life—a value adjustment from which action naturally follows. And, as much as anything, vagabonding is about time—our only real commodity—and how we choose to use it.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“you should view each new travel frustration—sickness, fear, loneliness, boredom, conflict—as just another curious facet in the vagabonding adventure.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“those who travel the world hoping to get “blinded by the light” are often blind to the light that’s all around them.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“Work is not just an activity that generates funds and creates desire; it’s the vagabonding gestation period, wherein you earn your integrity, start making plans, and get your proverbial act together. Work is a time to dream about travel and write notes to yourself, but it’s also the time to tie up your loose ends. Work is when you confront the problems you might otherwise be tempted to run away from. Work is how you settle your financial and emotional debts—so that your travels are not an escape from your real life but a discovery of your real life.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“People travel to faraway places to watch, in fascination, the kind of people they ignore at home.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“The secret of adventure, then, is not to carefully seek it out but to travel in such a way that it finds you. To do this, you first need to overcome the protective habits of home and open yourself up to unpredictability. As you begin to practice this openness, you’ll quickly discover adventure in the simple reality of a world that defies your expectations. More often than not, you’ll discover that “adventure” is a decision after the fact—a way of deciphering an event or an experience that you can’t quite explain.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“And let me tell you something. That first morning, when you are in your country of choice, away from all of the conventions of atypical, everyday lifestyle, looking around at your totally new surroundings, hearing strange languages, smelling strange, new smells, you’ll know exactly what I’m talking about. You’ll feel like the luckiest person in the world.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“We need the possibility of escape as surely as we need hope;”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“They are spending plenty of time and money on the road, but they never spent enough of themselves to begin with. Thus, their experience of travel has a diminished sense of value.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“Thus, it’s important to keep in mind that you should never go vagabonding out of a vague sense of fashion or obligation. Vagabonding is not a social gesture, nor is it a moral high ground. It’s not a seamless twelve-step program of travel correctness or a political statement that demands the reinvention of society. Rather, it’s a personal act that demands only the realignment of self. If this personal realignment is not something you’re willing to confront (or, of course, if world travel isn’t your idea of a good time), you have the perfect right to leave vagabonding to those who feel the calling.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“To know the universe itself as a road, as many roads, as roads for traveling souls.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“Sadly, the traffic lights of life will never all be green at the same time. Conditions are never perfect. “Someday” (“someday I’ll do this, someday I’ll do that”) is a disease that will take your dreams to the grave with you. Pro”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“The more we associate experience with cash value, the more we think that money is what we need to live. And the more we associate money with life, the more we convince ourselves that we’re too poor to buy our freedom.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“Vagabonding is about using the prosperity and possibility of the information age to increase your personal options instead of your personal possessions.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“antisabbatical”—a job approached “with the sole intention of staying for a limited period of time (often one year)…to raise enough funds to partake in another, more personally meaningful activity.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them. —HENRY DAVID THOREAU, WALDEN”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“There’s a story that comes from the tradition of the Desert Fathers, an order of Christian monks who lived in the wastelands of Egypt about seventeen hundred years ago. In the tale, a couple of monks named Theodore and Lucius shared the acute desire to go out and see the world. Since they’d made vows of contemplation, however, this was not something they were allowed to do. So, to satiate their wanderlust, Theodore and Lucius learned to “mock their temptations” by relegating their travels to the future. When the summertime came, they said to each other, “We will leave in the winter.” When the winter came, they said, “We will leave in the summer.” They went on like this for over fifty years, never once leaving the monastery or breaking their vows. Most of us, of course, have never taken such vows—but we choose to live like monks anyway, rooting ourselves to a home or a career and using the future as a kind of phony ritual that justifies the present. In this way, we end up spending (as Thoreau put it) “the best part of one’s life earning money in order to enjoy a questionable liberty during the least valuable part of it.” We’d love to drop all and explore the world outside, we tell ourselves, but the time never seems right. Thus, given an unlimited amount of choices, we make none. Settling into our lives, we get so obsessed with holding on to our domestic certainties that we forget why we desired them in the first place. Vagabonding is about gaining the courage to loosen your grip on the so-called certainties of this world. Vagabonding is about refusing to exile travel to some other, seemingly more appropriate, time of your life. Vagabonding is about taking control of your circumstances instead of passively waiting for them to decide your fate. Thus, the question of how and when to start vagabonding is not really a question at all. Vagabonding starts now. Even if the practical reality of travel is still months or years away, vagabonding begins the moment you stop making excuses, start saving money, and begin to look at maps with the narcotic tingle of possibility. From here, the reality of vagabonding comes into sharper focus as you adjust your worldview and begin to embrace the exhilarating uncertainty that true travel promises. In this way, vagabonding is not a merely a ritual of getting immunizations and packing suitcases. Rather, it’s the ongoing practice of looking and learning, of facing fears and altering habits, of cultivating a new fascination with people and places. This attitude is not something you can pick up at the airport counter with your boarding pass; it’s a process that starts at home. It’s a process by which you first test the waters that will pull you to wonderful new places.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“This book views long-term travel not as an escape but as an adventure and a passion—a way of overcoming your fears and living life to the fullest. In reading it, you will find out how to gain an impressive wealth (of travel time) through simplicity. You will find out how to discover and deal with new experiences and adventures on the road. And, as much as anything, you will find out how to travel the world on your own terms, by overcoming the myths and pretentions that threaten to cheapen your experience.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“Unfortunately, life on the traveler circuit is not an unbroken succession of magical moments and mountaintop experiences—and some sights and activities can get redundant after a while. Moreover, the standard attractions of travel (from the temples of Luxor to the party beaches of the Caribbean) can become so crowded and jaded by their own popularity that it’s difficult to truly experience them. Indeed, one of the big clichés of modern travel is the fear of letdown at a place you’ve always dreamed of visiting.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“finding a singular travel experience doesn’t require heroism so much as a simple change of mind-set. The reason so many travelers become frustrated while visiting world-famous destinations is that they are still playing by the rules of home, which “reward” you for following set routines and protocols.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“My greatest skill has been to want little. —HENRY DAVID THOREAU, WALDEN A”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
“the Buddha whimsically pointed out that seeking happiness in one’s material desires is as absurd as “suffering because a banana tree will not bear mangoes.”
Rolf Potts, Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel

« previous 1 3