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A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life by Parker J. Palmer
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“Like a wild animal, the soul is tough, resilient, resourceful, savvy, and self-sufficient: it knows how to survive in hard places. I learned about these qualities during my bouts with depression. In that deadly darkness, the faculties I had always depended on collapsed. My intellect was useless; my emotions were dead; my will was impotent; my ego was shattered. But from time to time, deep in the thickets of my inner wilderness, I could sense the presence of something that knew how to stay alive even when the rest of me wanted to die. That something was my tough and tenacious soul.”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“Wholeness does not mean perfection; it means embracing brokenness as an integral part of life”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“The soul is like a wild animal—tough, resilient, savvy, self-sufficient and yet exceedingly shy. If we want to see a wild animal, the last thing we should do is to go crashing through the woods, shouting for the creature to come out. But if we are willing to walk quietly into the woods and sit silently for an hour or two at the base of a tree, the creature we are waiting for may well emerge, and out of the corner of an eye we will catch a glimpse of the precious wildness we seek.”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“Formation may be the best name for what happens in a circle of trust, because the word refers, historically, to soul work done in community. But a quick disclaimer is in order, since formation sometimes means a process quite contrary to the one described in this book----a process in which the pressure of orthodox doctrine, sacred text, and institutional authority is applied to the misshapen soul in order to conform it to the shape dictated by some theology. This approach is rooted in the idea that we are born with souls deformed by sin, and our situation is hopeless until the authorities "form" us properly. But all of that is turned upside down by the principles of a circle of trust: I applaud the theologian who said that "the idea of humans being born alienated from the Creator would seem an abominable concept." Here formation flows from the belief that we are born with souls in perfect form. As time goes on, we subject to powers of deformation, from within as well as without, that twist us into shapes alien to the shape of the soul. But the soul never loses its original form and never stops calling us back to our birhtright integrity.”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“We can put the chairs in a circle, but as long as they are occupied by people who have an
inner hierarchy, the circle itself will have a divided life, one more form of "living within the lie": a false community.”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“Solitude does not necessarily mean living apart from others; rather, it means never living apart from one’s self.

A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“When we catch sight of the soul, we can become healers in a wounded world-in the family, in the neighborhood, in the workplace, and in political life-as we are called back to our "hidden wholeness" amid the violence of the storm.”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“Afraid that our inner light will be extinguished or our inner darkness exposed, we hide our true identities from each other. In the process, we become separated from our own souls. We end up living divided lives, so far removed from the truth we hold within that we cannot know the "integrity that comes from being what you are.”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“The deeper our faith, the more doubt we must endure; the deeper our hope, the more prone we are to despair; the deeper our
love, the more pain its loss will bring: these are a few of the paradoxes we must hold as human beings.”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“Wholeness does not mean perfection: it means embracing brokenness as an integral part of life. Knowing this gives me hope that human wholeness-mine, yours, ours-need not be a utopian dream, if we can use devastation as a seedbed for new life.”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“I am blessed to live in a democracy, not a totalitarian state. But the democracy I cherish is constantly threatened by a brand of politics that clothes avarice and the arrogance of power in patriotic and religious garb.”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“For the good [person] to realize that it is better to be whole than to be good is to enter on a strait and
narrow path compared to which his [or her] previous rectitude was flowery license.”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“First, we all have an inner teacher whose guidance is more reliable than anything we can get from a doctrine, ideology, collective belief system, institution, or leader. Second, we all need other
people to invite, amplify, and help us discern the inner teacher's voice”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“We find common bonds in the shared details of the human journey, not in the divergent conclusions we draw from those details.”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“Honest, open questions are countercultural,”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“What seed was planted when you or I arrived on earth with our identities intact? How can we recall and reclaim those birthright gifts and potentials?”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“I have been astonished to see how nature uses devastation to stimulate new growth, slowly but persistently healing her own wounds.”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“..when we live behind a wall, our inner darkness cannot be penetrated by the light that is in the world. In fact, all we can see "out there" is darkness, not realizing how much of it is of our own making! As a young man, the wall allowed me to cast my own darkness on others while remaining blissfully ignorant of how they saw me.”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“The powers and principalities would hold less sway over our lives if we refused to collaborate with them. But refusal is risky, so we deny our own truth, take up lives of "self-impersonation," and betray our identities.2”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“In the presence of a newly minted human being, I am reminded of what wholeness looks like. And I am sometimes moved to wonder, "Whatever became of me?”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“truth cannot "be reduced to aphorism or formulas. It is something alive and unpronounceable. Story creates an atmosphere in which [truth] becomes discernible as a pattern."3”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“We are cursed with the blessing of consciousness and choice, a two-edged sword that both divides us and can help us become whole. But choosing wholeness, which sounds like a good thing, turns out to be risky business, making us vulnerable in ways we would prefer to avoid.”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“Deep caring about each other's fate does seem to be on the decline, but I do not believe that New Age narcissism is much to blame. The external causes of our moral indifference are a fragmented mass society that leaves us isolated and afraid, an economic system that puts the rights of capital before the rights of people, and a political process that makes citizens into ciphers.

These are the forces that allow, even encourage, unbridled competition, social irresponsibility, and the survival of the financially fittest. The executives who brought down the major corporations by taking indecent sums off the top while wage earners of modest means lost their retirement accounts were clearly more influenced by capitalist amorality than by some New Age guru.”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“A politician who brings personal integrity into leadership helps us reclaim the popular trust that distinguishes true democracy from its cheap imitations.”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“A fault line runs down the middle of my life, and whenever it cracks open-divorcing my words and actions from the truth I hold within-things around me get shaky and start to fall apart.”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life
“Zen Judaism: For You, a Little Enlightenment,”
Parker J. Palmer, A Hidden Wholeness: The Journey Toward an Undivided Life