The Highly Sensitive Person Quotes

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The Highly Sensitive Person: How to Thrive When the World Overwhelms You The Highly Sensitive Person: How to Thrive When the World Overwhelms You by Elaine N. Aron
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The Highly Sensitive Person Quotes Showing 1-30 of 95
“We are a package deal, however. Our trait of sensitivity means we will also be cautious, inward, needing extra time alone. Because people without the trait (the majority) do not understand that, they see us as timid, shy, weak, or that greatest sin of all, unsociable. Fearing these labels, we try to be like others. But that leads to our becoming overaroused and distressed. Then that gets us labeled neurotic or crazy, first by others and then by ourselves.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person
“All virtues have a shadow.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person: How to Thrive When the World Overwhelms You
“HSPs make such good targets because we react so strongly.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person: How to Thrive When the World Overwhelms You
“A teacher of meditation once told the story of a man who wanted nothing to do with the stress of life, so he retreated to a cave to meditate day and night for the rest of his life. But soon he came out again, driven to overwhelming distress by the sound of the dripping of water in his cave. The moral is that, at least to some extent, the stresses will always be there,”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person
“Even a moderate and familiar stimulation, like a day at work, can cause an HSP to need quiet by evening.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person
“There is a common misunderstanding that emotions cause us to think illogically But recent scientific thinking, reviewed by psychologist Roy Baumeister and his colleagues, has placed emotion at the center of wisdom. One reason is that most emotion is felt after an event, which apparently serves to help us remember what happened and learn from it. The more upset we are by a mistake, the more we think about it and will be able to avoid it the next time. The more delighted we are by a success, the more we think and talk about it and how we did it, causing us to be more likely to be able to repeat it.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person
“Whatever the times, suffering eventually touches every life. How we live with it, and help others to, is one of the great creative and ethical opportunities”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person
“Make good boundaries your goal. They are your right, your responsibility, your greatest source of dignity.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person: How to Thrive When the World Overwhelms You
“Slowly, a gentle, quiet, personal victory of the spirit grows out of her fear and doubt.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person
“We are forced to make choices and set priorities, but being very conscientious, HSPs often put themselves last. Or at least we give ourselves no more time off or opportunity to learn new skills than anyone else. In fact, however, we need more.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person
“In my opinion, all HSPs are gifted because of their trait itself. But some are unusually so. Indeed, one reason for the idea of “liberated” HSPs was the seemingly odd mixture of traits emerging from study after study of gifted adults: impulsivity, curiosity, the strong need for independence, a high energy level, along with introversion, intuitiveness, emotional sensitivity, and nonconformity. Giftedness in the workplace, however, is tricky to handle. First, your originality can become a particular problem when you must offer your ideas in a group situation. Many organizations stress group problem solving just because it brings out the ideas in people like you, which are then tempered by others. The difficulty arises when everyone proposes ideas and yours seem so obviously better to”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person
“I am deeply moved by things. I’d hate to miss the intense joy of that.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person: How to Thrive When the World Overwhelms You
“You were born to be among the advisors and thinkers, the spiritual and moral leaders for your society. There is every reason for pride.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person: How to Thrive When the World Overwhelms You
“Sometimes people with our trait are said to be less happy or less capable of happiness. Of course, we can seem unhappy and moody, at least to non-HSPs, because we spend so much time thinking about things like the meaning of life and death and how complicated everything is—not black-and-white thoughts at all. Since most non-HSPs do not seem to enjoy thinking about such things, they assume we must be unhappy doing all that pondering. And”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person
“The point is best made by Aristotle, who supposedly asked, “Would you rather be a happy pig or an unhappy human?” HSPs prefer the good feeling of being very conscious, very human, even if what we are conscious of is not always cause for rejoicing.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person
“HSPs tend to fill that advisor role. We are the writers, historians, philosophers, judges, artists, researchers, theologians, therapists, teachers, parents, and plain conscientious citizens. What we bring to any of these roles is a tendency to think about all the possible effects of an idea. Often we have to make ourselves unpopular by stopping the majority from rushing ahead. Thus, to perform our role well, we have to feel very good about ourselves. We have to ignore all the messages from the warriors that we are not as good as they are. The warriors have their bold style, which has its value. But we, too, have our style and our own important contribution to make.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person
“For example, just a little time feeling hunger and crying or feeling cold and fussing helps an infant/body know his or her own wants. If the caretaker is feeding the infant/body before it is even hungry, it loses contact with its instincts. And if the infant /body is kept from exploring, it does not get used to the world.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person
“Even without overt sexual abuse, all young women are known to experience a descent into low self-esteem at puberty, probably as they realize their role as sexual objects. The highly sensitive girl will sense all the implications even more and make self-protection a higher priority. Some overeat to become unattractive, some overstudy or overtrain so they have no free time, some pick one boy early and hang on to him for protection.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person: How to Thrive When the World Overwhelms You
“In short, you do not have to take the job that will create excessive stress and overarousal. Someone else will take it and flourish in it. You do not have to work long hours. Indeed, it may be your duty to work shorter ones. It may not be best to advertise it, but keeping yourself healthy and in your right range of arousal is the first condition for helping others.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person: How to Thrive When the World Overwhelms You
“Being highly sensitive does not at all rule out being, in your own way, a tenacious survivor.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person: How to Thrive When the World Overwhelms You
“Everything alive is important; there’s something greater, I know.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person
“Spend enough time putting yourself out there in the world—your sensitivity is not something to be feared.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person
“A teacher of meditation once told the story of a man who wanted nothing to do with the stress of life, so he retreated to a cave to meditate day and night for the rest of his life. But soon he came out again, driven to overwhelming distress by the sound of the dripping of water in his cave. The moral is that, at least to some extent, the stresses will always be there, for we bring our sensitivity with us. What we need is a new way of living with the stressors.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person
“It is true that even when exhausted you still are providing something to those you serve. But you are out of touch with your deepest strengths, role-modelling self-destructive behaviour, martyring yourself, and giving others cause for guilt.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person: How to Thrive When the World Overwhelms You
“We make it especially hard for others to observe our trait because we are so responsive to our environments that we can be something like chameleons when around others, doing whatever it takes to fit in. I”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person
“DOES,” that expresses its facets nicely. D is for depth of processing. Our fundamental characteristic is that we observe and reflect before we act. We process everything more, whether we are conscious of it or not. O is for being easily overstimulated, because if you are going to pay more attention to everything, you are bound to tire sooner. E is for giving emphasis to our emotional reactions and having strong empathy which among other things helps us notice and learn. S is for being sensitive to all the subtleties around us. I will say more about these when I discuss the research. Third,”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person
“Being so eager to please, we’re not easy to liberate. We’re too aware of what others need. Yet our intuition also picks up on the inner question that must be answered. These two strong, conflicting currents may buffet us for years. Don’t worry if your progress toward liberation is slow, for it’s almost inevitable.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person
“I believe in aristocracy, though—if that is the right word, and if a democrat may use it. Not an aristocracy of power … but … of the sensitive, the considerate.… Its members are to be found in all nations and classes, and all through the ages, and there is a secret understanding between them when they meet. They represent the true human tradition, the one permanent victory of our queer race over cruelty and chaos. Thousands of them perish in obscurity, a few are great names. They are sensitive for others as well as themselves, they are considerate without being fussy, their pluck is not swankiness but the power to endure … E. M. Forster, “What I Believe,”         in Two Cheers for Democracy             Contents   Cover   Title Page   Copyright   Dedication   Epigraph   Preface   Are You Highly Sensitive? A Self-Test   1  The Facts About Being Highly Sensitive: A (Wrong) Sense of Being Flawed   2  Digging Deeper: Understanding Your Trait for All That It Is”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person: How to Survive and Thrive When the World Overwhelms You
“With sensitive children, physical blows or traumas aren't required to make them afraid of the dark.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person: How to Thrive When the World Overwhelms You
“HSPs probably make their greatest communication errors by avoiding the overarousal caused by unpleasantries. I think most people, but HSPs especially, dread anger, confrontation, tears, anxiety, "scenes," facing change (it always means the loss of something), being asked to change, being judged or shamed by our mistakes, or judging or shaming anyone else.”
Elaine N. Aron, The Highly Sensitive Person: How to Thrive When the World Overwhelms You

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