Deep Survival Quotes

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Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why by Laurence Gonzales
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Deep Survival Quotes Showing 1-30 of 32
“Survival is the celebration of choosing life over death. We know we're going to die. We all die. But survival is saying: perhaps not today. In that sense, survivors don't defeat death, they come to terms with it.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“The word 'experienced' often refers to someone who's gotten away with doing the wrong thing more frequently than you have.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“We don't understand the power of nature and the world because we don't live with it. Our environment is designed to sustain us. We are the domestic pets of a human zoo called civilization.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“To deal with reality you must first recognize it as such.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“The sun beams are always there. The trick is in seeing them.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“To lose everything at such a glorious eternity is far sweeter than to win by plodding through a cautious, painless, featureless life.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“The world we imagine seems as real as the ones we’ve experienced. We suffuse the model with the emotional values of past realities. And in the thrall of that vision (call it “the plan,” writ large), we go forth and take action. If things don’t go according to the plan, revising such a robust model may be difficult. In an environment that has high objective hazards, the longer it takes to dislodge the imagined world in favor of the real one, the greater the risk. In nature, adaptation is important; the plan is not. It’s a Zen thing. We must plan. But we must be able to let go of the plan, too.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“To survive, you must develop secondary emotions that function in a strategic balance with reason.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“I am constantly surrounded by a display of natural wonders...It is beauty surrounded by ugly fear. I write in my log that it's a view of heaven from a seat in hell. (survivor after 53 days at sea)”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“Everyone who dies out there dies of confusion.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“The maddening thing for someone with a Western scientific turn of mind is that it’s not what’s in your pack that separates the quick from the dead. It’s not even what’s in your mind. Corny as it sounds, it’s what’s in your heart.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“The perfect adventure shouldn’t be that much more hazardous in a real sense than ordinary life, for that invisible rope that holds us here can always break. We can live a life of bored caution and die of cancer. Better to take the adventure, minimize the risks, get the information, and then go forward in the knowledge that we’ve done everything we can. No,”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“CHARLES PERROW is a sociologist known for studying industrial accidents, such as those that occur with nuclear power plants, airlines, and shipping. In Normal Accidents, he wrote that “We construct an expected world because we can’t handle the complexity of the present one, and then process the information that fits the expected world, and find reasons to exclude the information that might contradict it. Unexpected or unlikely interactions are ignored when we make our construction.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“the firing of nerves in the amygdala, thereby dampening fear. Laughter, then, can help to temper negative emotions. And while all this might seem of purely academic interest, it could prove helpful when your partner breaks his leg at 19,000 feet in a blizzard on a Peruvian mountain. It is not a lack of fear that separates elite performers from the rest of us. They’re afraid, too, but they’re not overwhelmed by it. They manage fear. They use it to focus on taking correct action. Mike Tyson’s trainer, Cus D’Amato, said, “Fear is like fire. It can cook for you. It can heat your”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“We think we believe what we know, but we only truly believe what we feel.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“I’d go to his classes so that I’d be able to speak his language, the language of science. When he took the podium, he always began by saying, “Fellow students…” He taught me the humility of knowing that we were all, always, students, and that to stop being a student was to stop living. When”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“Shit happens, and if we just want to restrict ourselves to things where shit can't happen... we're not going to do anything very interesting.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“I’m a secular priest ordained by training, experience, and, most important, the willingness to accept the mantle of command. That willingness encompasses the realization that failure is easy, and such failure could kill me or, worse, kill someone else.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“The true survivor isn’t someone with nothing to lose. He has something precious to lose. But at the same time, he’s willing to bet it all on himself. And it makes what he has that much richer. Days stolen are always sweeter than days given.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“On the occasion of every accident that befalls you, remember to turn to yourself and inquire what power you have for turning it to use.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“(Psychologists have observed that one of the most basic human needs, beginning at birth, is to be gazed upon by another. Mothers throughout the world have been observed spending long periods staring into the eyes of their babies with a characteristic tilt of the head. To be seen is to be real, and without another to gaze upon us, we are nothing. Part of the terror of being lost stems from the idea of never being seen again.)”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“Choking is about thinking too much. Panic is about thinking too little.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“Heaven and earth are inhumane; they view the myriad creatures as straw dogs.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“Rigid people are dangerous people.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“Once the stage of psychological disintegration is reached, death is often not far away,” John Leach writes in Survival Psychology. “[T]he ability people possess to die gently, and often suddenly, through no organic cause, is a very real one.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“Whether a deity is actually listening or not, there is value in formally announcing your needs, desires, worries, sins, and goals in a focused, prayerful attitude. Only when you are aware can you take action.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“Helping someone else is the best way to ensure your own survival. It takes you out of yourself. It helps you to rise above your fears. Now you’re a rescuer, not a victim. And seeing how your leadership and skill buoy others up gives you more focus and energy to persevere. The cycle reinforces itself: You buoy them up, and their response buoys you up. Many people who survive alone report that they were doing it for someone else (a wife, boyfriend, mother, son) back home.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“Emotion is an instinctive response aimed at self-preservation.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“It’s the nature of our society that I’m considered unworthy of huge financial reward for that risk. But what can be earned is a certain nobility—not in the sense of aristocratic status but in the sense of striving for quality and dignity of behavior and living.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
“As an eminent neuroscientist, Damasio is as qualified as anyone to define the brain, and he calls it an “‘organ’ of information and government.”
Laurence Gonzales, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why

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