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Care of the Soul: A Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life Care of the Soul: A Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life by Thomas Moore
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Care of the Soul Quotes (showing 1-30 of 68)
“It is only through mystery and madness that the soul is revealed”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: A Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
“Disappointments in love, even betrayals and losses, serve the soul at the very moment they seem in life to be tragedies. The soul is partly in time and partly in eternity. We might remember the part that resides in eternity when we feel despair over the part that is in life.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: A Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
“We need people in our lives with whom we can be as open as possible. To have real conversations with people may seem like such a simple, obvious suggestion, but it involves courage and risk.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: A Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
“It may help us, in those times of trouble, to remember that love is not only about relationship, it is also an affair of the soul.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
“...to the soul, the most minute details and the most ordinary activities, carried out with mindfulness and art, have an effect far beyond their apparent insignificance.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: A Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
“A genuine odyssey is not about piling up experiences. It is a deeply felt, risky, unpredictable tour of the soul. ”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: A Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
tags: 36
“How many times do we lose an occasion for soul work by leaping ahead to final solutions without pausing to savor the undertones? We are a radically bottom-line society, eager to act and to end tension, and thus we lose opportunities to know ourselves for our motives and our secrets.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: A Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
tags: 125
“When we relate to our bodies as having soul, we attend to their beauty, their poetry and their expressiveness. Our very habit of treating the body as a machine, whose muscles are like pulleys and its organs engines, forces its poetry underground, so that we experience the body as an instrument and see its poetics only in illness.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: A Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
tags: 172
“Socrates and Jesus, two teachers of virtue and love, were executed because of the unsettling, threatening power of their souls, which was revealed in their personal lives and in their words.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: A Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
tags: 135
“To the soul, memory is more important than planning, art more compelling than reason, and love more fulfilling than understanding.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: A Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
tags: soul
“Soul is to be found in the vicinity of taboo.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
“Usually, the main problem with life conundrums is that we don't bring to them enough imagination”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
“It is in the nature of things to be drawn to the very experiences that will spoil our innocence, transform our lives, and give us necessary complexity and depth.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: A Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
“Good Demeter mothering keeps a child in the heat and passion of life which immortalize and establish soulfulness. Mothering involves not only physical survival and achievement—Demeter's grain and fruit—it is also concerned with guiding a child to his or her unknown depths and the mystery of fate.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: A Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
tags: 44
“Love releases us into the realm of divine imagination, where the soul is expanded and reminded of its unearthly cravings and needs. We think that when a lover inflates his loved one he is failing to acknowledge her flaws - "Love is blind." But it may be the other way around. Love allows a person to see the true angelic nature of another person, the halo, the aureole of divinity. Certainly from the perspective of ordinary life this is madness and illusion. But if we let loose our hold on our philosophies and psychologies of enlightenment and reason, we might learn to appreciate the perspective of eternity that enters life as madness, Plato's divine frenzy.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
“Body exercise is incomplete if it focuses exclusively on muscle and is motivated by the ideal of a physique unspoiled by fat.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: A Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
tags: 173
“As the poets and painters of centuries have tried to tell us, art is not about the expression of talent or the making of pretty things. It is about the preservation and containment of soul. It is about arresting life and making it available for contemplation. Art captures the eternal in the everyday, and it is the eternal that feeds soul—the whole world in a grain of sand. Leonardo”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
“Often care of the soul means not taking sides when there is a conflict at a deep level. It may be necessary to stretch the heart wide enough to embrace contradiction and paradox.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: A Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
“One effective “trick” in caring for the soul is to look with special attention and openness at what the individual rejects, and then to speak favorably for that rejected element.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
“Spirituality is seeded, germinates, sprouts and blossoms in the mundane. It is to be found and nurtured in the smallest of daily activities.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
“Besides, the story is ambivalent and mysterious in its ending. Is this Alkestis returning from down below? Why does she have a veil over her face? Could it be that when we forcefully bring back to life what has been lost through love what we get is only a shate of its former reality? Maybe we can never succeed fully in restoring the soul to life. Maybe she will always be veiled and at least partially shielded from the rigors of actual life. Love demands a submission that is total.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
“art intensifies the presence of the world.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
“Maybe one function of love is to cure us of an anemic imagination, a life emptied of romantic attachment and abandoned to reason.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredne
“One day I would like to make up my own DSM-111 with a list of “disorders” I have seen in my practice. For example, I would want to include the diagnosis “psychological modernism,” an uncritical acceptance of the values of the modern world. It includes blind faith in technology, inordinate attachment to material gadgets and conveniences, uncritical acceptance of the march of scientific progress, devotion to the electronic media, and a life-style dictated by advertising.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
“For the soul, depression is an initiation, a rite of passage. If we think that depression, so empty and dull, is void of imagination, we may overlook its initiatory aspects. We may be imagining imagination itself from a point of view foreign to Saturn; emptiness can be rife with feeling-tone, images of catharsis, and emotions of regret and loss. As a shade of mood, gray can be as interesting and as variegated as it is in black-and-white photography. If”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
“There is nothing neutral about the soul. It is the seat and the source of life. Either we respond to what the soul presents in its fantasies and desires, or we suffer from this neglect of ourselves. The power of the soul can hurl a person into ecstasy or into depression. It can be creative or destructive, gentle or aggressive. Power incubates within the soul and then makes its influential move into life as the expression of soul. If there is no soulfulness, then there is no true power, and if there is no power, then there can be no true soulfulness. Sadomasochism”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
“The basic intention in any caring, physical or psychological, is to alleviate suffering. But in relation to the symptom itself, observance means first of all listening and looking carefully at what is being revealed in the suffering. An intent to heal can get in the way of seeing.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
“The word passion means basically “to be affected,” and passion is the essential energy of the soul. The poet Rilke describes this passive power in the imagery of the flower’s structure, when he calls it a “muscle of infinite reception.” We don’t often think of the capacity to be affected as strength and as the work of a powerful muscle, and yet for the soul, as for the flower, this is its toughest work and its main role in our lives. Things”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life
“All human symptoms and problems, when they are taken to their depth and realized in a soulful way, find their ultimate solution in a religious sensibility.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredne
“... ongoing care for the soul rather than seek for a cure appreciates the mystery of human suffering and does not offer the illusion of a problem-free life.

I sees every fall into ignorance and confusion as an opportunity to discover that the beast residing at the center of the labyrinth is also an angel.

To approach this paradoxical point of tension where adjustment and abnormality meet is to move closer to the realization of our mystery-filled, star-born nature.

It is a beast this thing that stirs in the core of our being, but it is also the star of our innermost nature.

We have to care for this suffering with extreme reverence so that in our fear and anger at the beast, we do not overlook the star.”
Thomas Moore, Care of the Soul: A Guide for Cultivating Depth and Sacredness in Everyday Life

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