Lose Your Mother Quotes

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Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route by Saidiya Hartman
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“If slavery persists as an issue in the political life of black America, it is not because of an antiquarian obsession with bygone days or the burden of a too-long memory, but because black lives are still imperiled and devalued by a racial calculus and a political arithmetic that were entrenched centuries ago. This is the afterlife of slavery--skewed life chances, limited access to health and education, premature death, incarceration, and impoverishment.”
Saidiya V. Hartman, Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route
“Myth is the threshold of history.”
Saidiya V. Hartman, Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route
“To remember what they had lost and what they became, what had been torn apart and what had come together, the fugitives and refugees and multitudes in flight were called the Sisala, which means ‘to come together, to become together, to weave together.”
Saidiya V. Hartman, Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route
“If I had hoped to skirt the sense of being a stranger in the world by coming to Ghana, then disappointment awaited me. And I had suspected as much before I arrived. Being a stranger concerns not only matters of familiarity, belonging, and exclusion but as well involves a particular relation to the past. If the past is another country, then I am its citizen. I am the relic of an experience most preferred not to remember, as if the sheer will to forget could settle or decide the matter of history. .I am a reminder that twelve million crossed the Atlantic Ocean and the past is not yet over. I am the progeny of the captives. I am the vestige of the dead. And history is how the secular world attends to the dead.”
Saidiya V. Hartman, Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route
“The domain of the stranger is always an elusive elsewhere.”
Saidiya V. Hartman, Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route
“Why was it I sometimes felt as weary of America as if I too had landed in what was now South Carolina in 1526 or in Jamestown in 1619? Was it the tug of all the lost mothers and orphaned children? Or was it that each generation felt anew the yoke of a damaged life and the distress of being a native stranger, an eternal alien?”
Saidiya Hartman, Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route