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Looking Backward: 2000-1887 Looking Backward: 2000-1887 by Edward Bellamy
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Looking Backward Quotes Showing 1-18 of 18
“Human history, like all great movements, was cyclical, and returned to the point of beginning. The idea of indefinite progress in a right line was a chimera of the imagination, with no analogue in nature. The parabola of a comet was perhaps a yet better illustration of the career of humanity. Tending upward and sunward from the aphelion of barbarism, the race attained the perihelion of civilization only to plunge downward once more to its nether goal in the regions of chaos.”
Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward
“Is a man satisfied, merely because he is perfumed himself, to mingle with a malodorous crowd?”
Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward
“There is no such thing in a civilized society as self-support. In a state of society so barbarous as not even to know family cooperation, each individual may possibly support himself, though even then for a part of his life only; but from the moment that men begin to live together, and constitute even the rudest of society, self-support becomes impossible. As men grow more civilized, and the subdivision of occupations and services is carried out, a complex mutual dependence becomes the universal rule. Every man, however solitary may seem his occupation, is a member of a vast industrial partnership, as large as the nation, as large as humanity. The necessity of mutual dependence should imply the duty and guarantee of mutual support...”
Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward
“If bread is the first necessity of life, recreation is a close second.”
Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward: 2000-1887
“Caligula wished that the Roman people had but one neck that he might cut it off, and as I read this letter I am afraid that for a moment I was capable of wishing the same thing concerning the laboring class of America.”
Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward
“The folly of men not their hard heartedness was the great cause of the world s poverty.”
Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward: 2000-1887
“The effect of change in surroundings is like that of lapse of time in making the past seem remote.”
Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward: 2000-1887
“I cannot sufficiently celebrate the glorious liberty that reigns in the public libraries of the twentieth century as compared with the intolerable management of those of the nineteenth century, in which the books were jealously railed away from the people, and obtainable only at an expenditure of time and red tape calculated to discourage any ordinary taste for literature.”
Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward: 2000-1887
“With a tear for the dark past, turn we then to the dazzling future, and, veiling our eyes, press forward. The long and weary winter of the race is ended. Its summer has begun. Humanity has burst the chrysalis. The heavens are before it.”
Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward, 2000-1887
“As for the comparatively small class of violent crimes against persons, unconnected with any idea of gain, they were almost wholly confined, even in your day, to the ignorant and bestial; and in these days, when education and good manners are not the monopoly of a few, but universal, such atrocities are scarcely ever heard of.”
Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward: 2000-1887
“This mystery of use without consumption, of warmth without combustion, seems like magic, but was merely an ingenious application of the art now happily lost but carried to great perfection by your ancestors, of shifting the burden of one's support on the shoulders of others.”
Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward: 2000-1887
“Una de las mejores razones, si no hubiera otra, para la abolición del dinero, es precisamente que su posesión no implicaba un título legítimo en el poseedor. El dinero tenía el mismo valor en las manos del ladrón o del asesino que en las del hombre que lo había obtenido por el trabajo. Según nuestras ideas, el hecho de comprar y de vender es antisocial en todas sus tendencias. Es una educación en el egoísmo a expensas del vecino, y ninguna sociedad educada en estos principios podrá jamás elevarse por encima de un grado muy inferior de civilización.”
Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward: 2000-1887
“El paraguas individual es la imágen favorita de mi padre cuando quiere caracterizar el tiempo en que cada uno vivía sólo para sí y para su familia. Hay un cuadro del siglo XIX que representa una multitud bajo la lluvia, donde cada cual mantiene su paraguas por encima de su cabeza y la de su esposa, y obsequia a su vecino con las gotas que chorrean de aquél. Dice mi padre que ese cuadro debió ser para el artista una especie de sátira de aquellos tiempos.”
Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward: 2000-1887
“Cada uno, sin dejar de andar, se volvía para escuchar el fantasma de la incertidumbre, que murmuraba a su oído: - Trabaja cuanto puedas, amigo mío; levántate temprano y no descanses hasta bien entrada la noche, robes con habilidad o sirvas fielmente, jamás llegarás a conocer la seguridad! Rico hoy, mañana puedes volver a ser poblre. En vano dejarás millones a tus hijos, jamás podrás estar seguro de que tu hijo no llegará a ser el criado de tu criado, o que tu hija no tenga que venderse por un trozo de pan -”
Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward: 2000-1887
“Moreover, the excessive individualism which then prevailed was inconsistent with much public spirit. What little wealth you had seems almost wholly to have been lavished in private luxury. Nowadays, on the contrary, there is no destination of the surplus wealth so popular as the adornment of the city, which all enjoy in equal degree.”
Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward
“Wretched men, I was moved to cry, who, because they will not learn to be helpers of one another, are doomed to be beggars of one another from the least to the greatest!”
Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward: 2000-1887
“They were not serving the public interest, but their immediate personal interest, and it was nothing to them what the ultimate effect of their course on the general prosperity might be, if but they increased their own hoard, for these goods were their own, and the more they sold and the more they got for them, the greater their gain. The more wasteful the people were, the more articles they did not want which they could be induced to buy, the better for these sellers.”
Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward: 2000-1887
“Who is capable of self-support?” he demanded. “There is no such thing in a civilized society as self-support. In a state of society so barbarous as not even to know family cooperation, each individual may possibly support himself, though even then for a part of his life only; but from the moment that men begin to live together, and constitute even the rudest sort of society, self-support becomes”
Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward