Joy in the Morning Quotes

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Joy in the Morning (Jeeves, #8) Joy in the Morning by P.G. Wodehouse
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Joy in the Morning Quotes Showing 1-22 of 22
“It was one of those cases where you approve the broad, general principle of an idea but can't help being in a bit of a twitter at the prospect of putting it into practical effect. I explained this to Jeeves, and he said much the same thing had bothered Hamlet.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Jeeves in the Morning
“It is true of course, that I have a will of iron, but it can be switched off if the circumstances seem to demand it.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Jeeves in the Morning
“When a girl uses six derogatory adjectives in her attempt to paint the portrait of the loved one, it means something. One may indicate a merely temporary tiff. Six is big stuff.”
P. G. Wodehouse, Jeeves in the Morning
“There was a sound in the background like a distant sheep coughing gently on a mountainside. Jeeves sailing into action.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Jeeves in the Morning
“She came leaping towards me, like Lady Macbeth coming to get first-hand news from the guest-room.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Joy in the Morning
“Too often on such occasions one feels, as I feel so strongly with regard to poor old Stilton, that the kindly thing to do would be to seize the prospective bridegroom's trousers in one's teeth and draw him back from danger, as faithful dogs do to their masters on the edge of precipices on dark nights.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Jeeves in the Morning
“You can't go by what a girl says, when she's giving you the devil for making a chump of yourself. It's like Shakespeare. Sounds well, but doesn't mean anything.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Joy in the Morning
“However devoutly a girl may worship the man of her choice, there always comes a time when she feels an irresistible urge to haul off and let him have it in the neck.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Joy in the Morning
“We part, then, for the nonce, do we?'

'I fear so, sir.'

'You take the high road, and self taking the low road, as it were?'

'Yes, sir.'

'I shall miss you, Jeeves.'

'Thank you, sir.'

'Who was that chap who was always beefing about gazelles?'

'The poet Moore, sir. He complained that he had never nursed a dear gazelle, to glad him with its soft black eye, but when it came to know him well, it was sure to die.'

'It's the same with me. I am a gazelle short. You don't mind me alluding to you as a gazelle, Jeeves?'

'Not at all, sir.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Joy in the Morning
“I must say my heart leaped up, as Jeeves tells me his does when he beholds a rainbow in the sky.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Joy in the Morning
“Have you lost the girl you love?’ ‘That’s what I’m trying to figure out. I can’t make up my mind. It all depends what construction you place on the words “I never want to see or speak to you again in this world or the next, you miserable fathead.”’ ‘Did she say that?”
P.G. Wodehouse, Joy in the Morning
“How did it all end?'

'Oh, I got away with my life. Still, what's life?'

'Life's all right.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Joy in the Morning
“A hoarse shout from within and a small china ornament whizzing past my head informed me that my old friend was at home.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Joy in the Morning
“fine figure of a young fellow as far northwards as the neck, but above that solid concrete.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Joy in the Morning
“I will be your wife, Bertie.’ There didn’t seem much to say to this except ‘Oh, thanks.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Joy in the Morning
“Too often on such occasions one feels, as I feel so strongly with regard to poor old Stilton, that the kindly thing to do would be to seize the prospective bridegroom’s trousers in one’s teeth and draw him back from danger, as faithful dogs do to their masters on the edge of precipices on dark nights.’ ‘Yes,”
P.G. Wodehouse, Joy in the Morning
“Furthermore, as is the case with so many of the younger literati, he dresses like a tramp cyclist, affecting turtleneck sweaters and grey flannel bags with a patch on the knee and conveying a sort of general suggestion of having been left out in the rain overnight in an ash can.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Joy in the Morning
“Aunt Agatha is my tough aunt, the one who eats broken bottles and conducts human sacrifices by the light of the full moon.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Joy in the Morning
tags: humor
“I knew a chap who bumped his leg, and it turned black and had to be cut off at the knee.’ ‘You do seem to mix with the most extraordinary people.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Joy in the Morning
“Jeeves’ eyes had taken on the look of cautious reserve which you see in those of parrots, when offered half a banana by a stranger of whose bona fides they are not convinced.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Joy in the Morning
tags: humor
“Aunt Agatha is like an elephant- not so much to look at, for in appearance she resembles more a well-bred vulture, but because she never forgets.”
P.G. Wodehouse, Joy in the Morning
tags: humor
“Boko looked at me, and raised his eyebrows. I looked at Boko, and raised my eyebrows. Nobby looked at us both, and raised her eyebrows. Then we looked at Stilton, and all raised our eyebrows. It was one of those big eyebrow-raising mornings.”
P.G. Wodehouse , Joy in the Morning