The Sorrows of Young Werther Quotes

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The Sorrows of Young Werther The Sorrows of Young Werther by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
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“The human race is a monotonous affair. Most people spend the greatest part of their time working in order to live, and what little freedom remains so fills them with fear that they seek out any and every means to be rid of it.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“I have so much in me, and the feeling for her absorbs it all; I have so much, and without her it all comes to nothing.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“I am proud of my heart alone, it is the sole source of everything, all our strength, happiness and misery. All the knowledge I possess everyone else can acquire, but my heart is all my own”
Goethe Wolfgang, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“No one is willing to believe that adults too, like children, wander about this earth in a daze and, like children, do not know where they come from or where they are going, act as rarely as they do according to genuine motives, and are as thoroughly governed as they are by biscuits and cake and the rod.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“Sometimes I don't understand how another can love her, is allowed to love her, since I love her so completely myself, so intensely, so fully, grasp nothing, know nothing, have nothing but her!”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“It's true that nothing in this world makes us so necessary to others as the affection we have for them.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“Is this the destiny of man? Is he only happy before he has acquired his reason or after he has lost it?”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“The suffering may be moral or physical; and in my opinion it is just as absurd to call a man a coward who destroys himself, as to call a man a coward who dies of a malignant fever.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“And when I look around the apartment where I now am,—when I see Charlotte’s apparel lying before me, and Albert’s writings, and all those articles of furniture which are so familiar to me, even to the very inkstand which I am using,—when I think what I am to this family—everything. My friends esteem me; I often contribute to their happiness, and my heart seems as if it could not beat without them; and yet—if I were to die, if I were to be summoned from the midst of this circle, would they feel—or how long would they feel—the void which my loss would make in their existence? How long! Yes, such is the frailty of man, that even there, where he has the greatest consciousness of his own being, where he makes the strongest and most forcible impression, even in the memory, in the heart of his beloved, there also he must perish,—vanish,—and that quickly.

I could tear open my bosom with vexation to think how little we are capable of influencing the feelings of each other. No one can communicate to me those sensations of love, joy, rapture, and delight which I do not naturally possess; and though my heart may glow with the most lively affection, I cannot make the happiness of one in whom the same warmth is not inherent.

Sometimes I don’t understand how another can love her, is allowed to love her, since I love her so completely myself, so intensely, so fully, grasp nothing, know nothing, have nothing but her!

I possess so much, but my love for her absorbs it all. I possess so much, but without her I have nothing.

One hundred times have I been on the point of embracing her. Heavens! what a torment it is to see so much loveliness passing and repassing before us, and yet not dare to lay hold of it! And laying hold is the most natural of human instincts. Do not children touch everything they see? And I!

Witness, Heaven, how often I lie down in my bed with a wish, and even a hope, that I may never awaken again! And in the morning, when I open my eyes, I behold the sun once more, and am wretched. If I were whimsical, I might blame the weather, or an acquaintance, or some personal disappointment, for my discontented mind; and then this insupportable load of trouble would not rest entirely upon myself. But, alas! I feel it too sadly; I am alone the cause of my own woe, am I not? Truly, my own bosom contains the source of all my pleasure. Am I not the same being who once enjoyed an excess of happiness, who at every step saw paradise open before him, and whose heart was ever expanded towards the whole world? And this heart is now dead; no sentiment can revive it. My eyes are dry; and my senses, no more refreshed by the influence of soft tears, wither and consume my brain. I suffer much, for I have lost the only charm of life: that active, sacred power which created worlds around me,—it is no more. When I look from my window at the distant hills, and behold the morning sun breaking through the mists, and illuminating the country around, which is still wrapped in silence, whilst the soft stream winds gently through the willows, which have shed their leaves; when glorious Nature displays all her beauties before me, and her wondrous prospects are ineffectual to extract one tear of joy from my withered heart,—I feel that in such a moment I stand like a reprobate before heaven, hardened, insensible, and unmoved. Oftentimes do I then bend my knee to the earth, and implore God for the blessing of tears, as the desponding labourer in some scorching climate prays for the dews of heaven to moisten his parched corn.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“What a torment it is to see so much loveliness passing and repassing before us, and yet not dare to lay hold of it!”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“Was ich weiß, kann jeder wissen. Mein Herz hab' ich allein.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“We often feel that we lack something, and seem to see that very quality in someone else, promptly attributing all our own qualities to him too, and a kind of ideal contentment as well. And so the happy mortal is a model of complete perfection--which we have ourselves created.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“Every day I observe more and more the folly of judging of others by ourselves; and I have so much trouble with myself, and my own heart is in such constant agitation, that I am well content to let others pursue their own course, if they only allow me the same privilege.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“In happy ignorance, I sighed for a world I did not know, where I hoped to find every pleasure and enjoyment which my heart could desire; and now, on my return from that wide world... how many disappointed hopes and unsuccessful plans have I brought back!”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“I treat my heart like a sick child and gratify its every fancy.”
Goethe Wolfgang, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“How often do I lull my seething blood to rest, for you have never seen anything so unsteady, so uncertain, as this heart.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“if only these treasures were not so fragile as they are precious and beautiful.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“What is the destiny of man, but to fill up the measure of his sufferings, and to drink his allotted cup of bitterness?”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“Must it ever be thus-that the source of our happiness must also be the fountain of our misery? The full and ardent sentiment which animated my heart with the love of nature, overwhelming me with a torrent of delight, and which brought all paradise before me, has now become an insupportable torment, a demon which perpetually pursues and harrasses me.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“I examine my own being, and find there a world, but a world rather of imagination and dim desires, than of distinctness and living power. Then everything swims before my senses, and I smile and dream while pursuing my way through the world.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“He values my understanding and talents more highly than my heart, but I am proud of the latter only. It is the sole source of everything of our strength, happiness, and misery. All the knowledge I possess every one else can acquire, but my heart is exclusively my own.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“Nothing is more dangerous than solitude.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“أعدك يا صديقتي العزيزة أن أصلح من شأني, وأستمتع بالحاضر, وأطوي صفحة الماضي.
ولا شك أنك على صواب يا خير صديق أذ تقولين أنه لخير للبشر لو كفوا عن تقليب ذكريات الاحزان الغابرة بخيالهم المتقد, بدلا من تحمل حاضرهم بصبر وطمأنينة, ولكن الله وحده يعلم لماذا جبل الناس على هذا”
جوته, آلام فيرتير
“A dim vastness is spread before our souls; the perceptions of our mind are as obscure as those of our vision... But alas! when we have attained our object, when the distant 'there' becomes the present 'here,' all is changed; we are as poor and circumscribed as ever, and our souls still languish for unattainable happiness.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“I am amazed to see how deliberately I have entangled myself step by step. To have seen my position so clearly, and yet to have acted so like a child!”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“No doubt you are right... there would be far less suffering amongst mankind if men... did not employ their imaginations so assiduously in recalling the memory of past sorrow, instead of bearing their present lot with equanimity.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“When she sees the leaves fall, they raise no other idea in her mind than that winter is approaching.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“Since you know me and my destiny only too well, you probably also know what attracts me to all unfortunate people.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“A wonderful serenity has taken possession of my entire soul, like these sweet mornings of spring which I enjoy with my whole heart. I am alone, and feel the charm of existence in this spot, which was created for the bliss of souls like mine. I am so happy, my dear friend, so absorbed in the exquisite sense of mere tranquil existence, that I neglect my talents. I should be incapable of drawing a single stroke at the present moment; and yet I feel that I never was a greater artist than now. When, while the lovely valley teems with vapour around me, and the meridian sun strikes the upper surface of the impenetrable foliage of my trees, and but a few stray gleams steal into the inner sanctuary, I throw myself down among the tall grass by the trickling stream; and, as I lie close to the earth, a thousand unknown plants are noticed by me: when I hear the buzz of the little world among the stalks, and grow familiar with the countless indescribable forms of the insects and flies, then I feel the presence of the Almighty, who formed us in his own image, and the breath of that universal love which bears and sustains us, as it floats around us in an eternity of bliss; and then, my friend, when darkness overspreads my eyes, and heaven and earth seem to dwell in my soul and absorb its power, like the form of a beloved mistress, then I often think with longing, Oh, would I could describe these conceptions, could impress upon paper all that is living so full and warm within me, that it might be the mirror of my soul, as my soul is the mirror of the infinite God! O my friend — but it is too much for my strength — I sink under the weight of the splendour of these visions!”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther
“I was oppressed with the sensations I then felt; I sunk under the weight of them.”
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther

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