Synagogues In A Time Of Change Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
Synagogues In A Time Of Change: Fragmentation And Diversity In Jewish Religious Movements Synagogues In A Time Of Change: Fragmentation And Diversity In Jewish Religious Movements by Zachary I. Heller
2 ratings, 4.00 average rating, 0 reviews
Open Preview
Synagogues In A Time Of Change Quotes (showing 1-4 of 4)
“Revising institutional views about the synagogue Reinterpreting Jewish values Reimagining the venue of the synagogue By unshackling synagogues from leftover views about how they do their work, by creating stronger points of connection between Jewish values and the real life concerns of individuals, and by reimagining the synagogue as a venue where people are empowered to find and create community on their terms, synagogues may become places of greater vision, inspiration, and relevance.”
Zachary I. Heller, Synagogues in a Time of Change: Fragmentation and Diversity in Jewish Religious Movements
“For simplicity's sake, the chart below provides an accessible way to contrast the worldview of synagogues born in another era with the fundamentally different times in which we live.”
Zachary I. Heller, Synagogues in a Time of Change: Fragmentation and Diversity in Jewish Religious Movements
“Today, these values are often encrusted in language that obscures their meaning and inhibits their potential to influence and inspire. For example, the category of mitzvah, often translated as a “sacred obligation” or “commandment,” clashes with the notion of personal autonomy. However, what happens when we speak about committing ourselves to a higher purpose in life, which is one potential way of reframing the category of mitzvah? Another example: in a world that is always “on,” what will resonate with individuals on a personal level, observing Shabbat and holidays or resting and renewing one's body, spirit, and mind?”
Zachary I. Heller, Synagogues in a Time of Change: Fragmentation and Diversity in Jewish Religious Movements
“If synagogues would reconceptualize their venue as a third place, they would feel more like a welcoming home in all aspects of their operations.21 Reenvisioning the synagogue venue in this way is not a far stretch in imagination, as “home,” or bayit, precedes the three primary functions of synagogues (beit kenesset, beit midrash, beit tefillah). This shift in thinking can cause profound changes in how synagogues relate to people on an individual level, how they approach the diversity of today's Jewish community, and how they seek to relate to their broader environment. For example, in contrast to the above mission and vision statements, a synagogue that sees itself as third place might have the following mission and vision: The mission of Temple XX is to enable members and seekers to experience Judaism in a community that offers compelling meaning to today's big and small questions of life from a Jewish perspective. Temple XX broadens and deepens opportunities for all—young and old, Jewish and non-Jewish, religious and secular, learned and just learning, committed and seeking—to find and create a welcoming home. By realigning outdated organizational thinking with relevant frameworks for building Jewish community, Temple XX's initiatives reach out to those beyond the core synagogue community. A synagogue that reenvisions itself as a third place might have a vision statement that reads: Our synagogue aspires to become a place of relevance, where people will want to experience the joy of community and be inspired by enduring Jewish values. Between a hectic home life and a pressured work environment, our synagogue will be the Jewish place where people renew their minds and spirits and create rewarding Jewish connections.”
Zachary I. Heller, Synagogues in a Time of Change: Fragmentation and Diversity in Jewish Religious Movements