The Yamas & Niyamas Quotes

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The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice by Deborah Adele
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The Yamas & Niyamas Quotes Showing 1-30 of 49
“I have found three ways of thinking that shift me out of a feeling of powerlessness: practicing gratitude, trust in the moment, and thinking about others.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“Balance is like this. Spreading ourselves thin looks impressive, but in the end, we are the first to lose.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“We are captured in a culture where our very identity is tied up with our accomplishments. We wear all we have to do like a badge on our shirt for all to see. In this rush to get to the next thing, we have left no time for ourselves to digest and assimilate our lives; this may be our biggest theft of all. We need time to catch up with ourselves. We need time to chew and ponder and allow the experiences of life to integrate within us. We need time to rest and to reflect and to contemplate.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“Living the life that cries to be lived from the depth of our being frees up a lot of energy and vitality. The juices flow. Everyone around us benefits from the aliveness that we feel. On the other hand, suppressing that life, for whatever reason, takes a lot of our life energy just in the managing of the pretending.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“When we expect the world to meet our needs, we turn outside of ourselves to find sustenance and completion. We expect our partners to fulfill us, our jobs to meet our needs, and success to solve all of our problems. And when it doesn’t, we continue to play the “if only” game, looking for that one more thing. Or we play the “planning” and “regretting” game. We let our contentment be managed by all these uncontrollable variables. As long as we think satisfaction comes from an external source, we can never be content. Looking outward for fulfillment will always disappoint us and keep contentment one step out of reach.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“Courage is not the absence of fear, but the ability to be afraid without being paralyzed.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“Feeling powerless leads to outward aggression in the form of frustration and anger, or withdrawal inward into depression and victimization.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“Being an audience for God also means we have to get off center stage. We don’t need to be the center of attention and activity all the time. I think it might surprise us to realize how much crazy activity we create in our days just so we can feel important. We wear our busyness like a badge, like our busyness would somehow impress the rest of the world, or impress ourselves. How many of us go to bed with a sense of accomplishment because we checked a lot of things off our task list or someone told us how “great” we were, or we “helped” others? What if walked off stage altogether and put God there instead. Maybe then we could go to sleep at night, not with a sense of accomplishment, but with a sense of wonder, because all day we had been an attentive audience to the divine play.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“When we don’t know what we want or we don’t have the courage to pursue it, everything that everyone else is doing looks tempting to us. We begin to lust after others’ accomplishments and others’ possessions. We get sidetracked from our own dreams and our own realness.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“I often hear people say, “I just don’t know what to do.” I think more often than not, we do know what to do; the cost of our realness just seems too high at the time.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“Carl Jung understood the fluidity of truth when he made the statement that what is true at one time for us, at some point no longer serves us, and eventually becomes a lie. He understood that truth changes over time;”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“When we run from life, try to manage life, or leave our energy scattered here and there, we feel differently than when our whole self shows up with our thoughts, words, and actions congruent and unified. When we are centered in the moment, we can fully meet the ordinariness of life as well as the challenges of life.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“Seeking out people and experiences we would normally avoid provides a fertile place to learn new things about ourselves and about life.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“I think more often than not, we do know what to do; the cost of our realness just seems too high at the time.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“We can’t save people, or fix them. All we can do is model, and that points the finger back at us.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“and grow gentle eyes that are not afraid to see reality as it is. We learn compassion as we stop living in our heads, where we can neatly arrange things, and ground ourselves in our bodies, where things might not be so neat.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“Discontentment is the illusion that there can be something else in the moment.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“Thinking we know what is better for others becomes a subtle way we do violence. When we take it upon ourselves to “help” the other we whittle away at their sense of autonomy. Nonviolence asks us to trust the other’s ability to find the answer they are seeking. It asks us to have faith in the other, not feel sorry for them.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“As we purify ourselves from the heaviness and clutter of toxins, distractions, and scatteredness, we gain clarity to meet each moment with integrity and freshness. We become more pure in our relationship with each moment.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“Nice is an illusion, a cloak hiding lies. It is an imposed image of what one thinks they should be. It is a packaging of self in a presentable box, imposed by an outer authority.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“All demands and expectations that we place on ourselves steal from our own enthusiasm. All self-sabotage, lack of belief in ourselves, low self-esteem, judgments, criticisms, and demands for perfection are forms of self-abuse in which we destroy the very essence of our vitality. All the ways we live in the past or future steal from ourselves. And all the ways we put up fences, whether real or imagined, around our physical belongings or around our mental idealisms, we put up barriers that steal from the full expansion of our own lives.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“when the process of our self-expression is imposed on for whatever reason, we can easily turn towards self-indulgence.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“Any kind of holding too long or grasping too far forward in an effort to maintain a sense of security is deadly to our spiritual growth and the natural unfolding of our lives.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“A colander is an excellent example of adikara. We may seek something so earnestly and yet, if we are full of holes like the colander, what we want will always elude us. Building our adikara is plugging our holes by growing our competency in the area of our desires. Building our competency takes practice and learning.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“I think life is like this. It gives us tasks, that should we succeed, grow us into the kind of people that life can trust with important things.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“Yogiraj Achala reminds us, “What are you not seeing because you are seeing what you are seeing?”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“In Modern Man in Search of a Soul, Jung writes, “Thoroughly unprepared, we take the step into the afternoon of life; worse still, we take this step with the false presupposition that our truths and ideals will serve us as hitherto. But we cannot live the afternoon of life according to the programme of life’s morning – for what was great in the morning will be little at evening, and what in the morning was true will at evening have become a lie.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“we as a culture have constructed barriers to tame reality.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“It is only our minds that have created the turmoil in our gut and kept us hostage to the possibility of our own lives.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice
“We seem far from grasping the concept of “enough.”
Deborah Adele, The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga's Ethical Practice

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