Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions Quotes

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Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions by Alcoholics Anonymous
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Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions Quotes Showing 1-17 of 17
“We have learned that the satisfaction of instincts cannot be the sole aim of our lives.”
Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions
“We sometimes hurt those we love because they need to be “taught a lesson,” when we really want to punish. We were depressed and complained we felt bad, when in fact we were mainly asking for sympathy and attention. This odd trait of mind and emotion, this perverse wish to hide a bad motive underneath a good one, permeates human affairs from top to bottom. This subtle and elusive kind of self-righteousness can underlie the smallest act or thought. Learning daily to spot, admit, and correct these flaws is the essence of character-building and good living. An honest regret for harms done, a genuine gratitude for blessings received, and a willingness to try for better things tomorrow will be the permanent assets we shall seek.”
Alcoholics Anonymous, Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions
“It is a spiritual axiom that every time we are disturbed, no matter what the cause, there is something wrong with us.”
Alcoholics Anonymous, Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions
“When a man or a woman has a spiritual awakening, the most important meaning of it is that he has now become able to do, feel, and believe that which he could not do before on his unaided strength and resources alone. He has been granted a gift which amounts to a new state of consciousness and being. He has been set on a path which tells him he is really going somewhere, that life is not a dead end, not something to be endured or mastered. In a very real sense he has been transformed, because he has laid hold of a source of strength which, in one way or another, he had hitherto denied himself. He finds himself in possession of a degree of honesty, tolerance, unselfishness, peace of mind, and love of which he had thought himself quite incapable.”
Alcoholics Anonymous, Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions
“Since most of us are born with an abundance of natural desires, it isn’t strange that we often let these far exceed their intended purpose. When they drive us blindly, or we willfully demand that they supply us with more satisfactions or pleasures than are possible or due us, that is the point at which we depart from the degree of perfection that God wishes for us here on earth. That is the measure of our character defects, or, if you wish, of our sins. If we ask, God will certainly forgive our derelictions. But in no case does He render us white as snow and keep us that way without our cooperation. That is something we are supposed to be willing to work toward ourselves. He asks only that we try as best we know how to make progress in the building of character.”
Alcoholics Anonymous, Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions
“Lord, make me a channel of thy peace—that where there is hatred, I may bring love—that where there is wrong, I may bring the spirit of forgiveness—that where there is discord, I may bring harmony—that where there is error, I may bring truth—that where there is doubt, I may bring faith—that where there is despair, I may bring hope—that where there are shadows, I may bring light—that where there is sadness, I may bring joy. Lord,”
Alcoholics Anonymous, Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions
“Perhaps one of the greatest rewards of meditation and prayer is the sense of belonging that comes to us. We no longer live in a completely hostile world. We are no longer lost and frightened and purposeless. The moment we catch even a glimpse of God’s will, the moment we begin to see truth, justice, and love as the real and eternal things in life, we are no longer deeply disturbed by all the seeming evidence to the contrary that surrounds us in purely human affairs. We know that God lovingly watches over us. We know that when we turn to Him, all will be well with us, here and hereafter.”
Alcoholics Anonymous, Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions
“In all these strivings, so many of them well-intentioned, our crippling handicap had been our lack of humility. We had lacked the perspective to see that character-building and spiritual values had to come first, and that material satisfactions were not the purpose of living.”
Alcoholics Anonymous, Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions
“In all times of emotional disturbance or indecision, we can pause, ask for quiet, and in the stillness simply say: “God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, and wisdom to know the difference. Thy will, not mine, be done.”
Alcoholics Anonymous, Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions
“Tradition Three “The only requirement for A.A. membership is a desire to stop drinking.” THIS Tradition is packed with meaning. For A.A. is really saying to every serious drinker, “You are an A.A. member if you say so. You can declare yourself in; nobody can keep you out. No matter who you are, no matter how low you’ve gone, no matter how grave your emotional complications—even your crimes—we still can’t deny you A.A. We don’t want to keep you out. We aren’t a bit afraid you’ll harm us, never mind how twisted or violent you may be. We just want to be sure that you get the same great chance for sobriety that we’ve had. So you’re an A.A. member the minute you declare yourself.”
Alcoholics Anonymous, Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions
“Everywhere he sees people filled with anger and fear, society breaking up into warring fragments. Each fragment says to the others, “We are right and you are wrong.” Every such pressure group, if it is strong enough, self-righteously imposes its will upon the rest. And everywhere the same thing is being done on an individual basis. The sum of all this mighty effort is less peace and less brotherhood than before. The philosophy of self-sufficiency is not paying off. Plainly enough, it is a bone-crushing juggernaut whose final achievement is ruin.”
Alcoholics Anonymous, Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions
“Of myself I am nothing, the Father doeth the works”
Alcoholics Anonymous, Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions
“For in meditation, debate has no place.”
Alcoholics Anonymous, Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions
“The primary fact that we fail to recognize is our total inability to form a true partnership with another human being.”
Alcoholics Anonymous, Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions
“Looking again at those defects we are still unwilling to give up, we ought to erase the hard-and-fast lines that we have drawn. Perhaps we shall be obliged in some cases still to say, “This I cannot give up yet…,” but we should not say to ourselves, “This I will never give up!”
Alcoholics Anonymous, Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions
“For it is by self-forgetting that one finds. It is by forgiving that one is forgiven. It is by dying that one awakens to Eternal Life.”
Alcoholics Anonymous, Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions
“Perhaps one of the greatest rewards of meditation and prayer is the sense of belonging that comes to us.”
Alcoholics Anonymous, Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions