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Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me by Adrienne Brodeur
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Wild Game Quotes Showing 1-30 of 37
“Loneliness is not about how many people you have around. It’s about whether or not you feel connected. Whether or not you’re able to be yourself.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“As any magician knows, it is not the smoke and mirrors that trick people; it is that the human mind makes assumptions and misunderstands them as truths.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards. —SøREN KIERKEGAARD”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“Here was my choice: I could continue down the well-trod path upon which I'd been running for so very long and pass along the inheritance like a baton, as blithely as I did my light hair and fair skin. My daughter could do her best to outrun it...
Or I could slow down, catch my breath, and look mindfully for a new path. There had to be another way and I owed it to my daughter to find it.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“Deception takes commitment, vigilance, and a very good memory. To keep the truth buried, you must tend to it. For years and years, my job was to pile on sand - fistfuls, shovelfuls, bucketfuls, whatever the moment necessitated - in an effort to keep my mother's secret buried.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“My mother had narrowed her vision and chosen happiness, and I had willingly signed on, both of us ignoring the dangers of the new terrain.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“All I knew at that moment was I felt lucky. My mother had chosen me , and, together, we were embarking on a great adventure.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom. —ANAïS NIN”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“I know that no one’s story is simple. And no single story tells the whole truth.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“We spoke on the phone regularly and turned to text when she could no longer talk. What would I do without her? Her answer came in her final text message to me, written on the morning of her death: Where is Nora Ephron when we need her? I took this to mean “Embrace the mess, live fully, carry on.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“You have no idea how much you can learn about yourself by plunging into someone else’s life” Margot said.
I smiled at her, not fully understanding what she was saying but feeling a small ping of comprehension, an olive pit smacking the wall of my consciousness.
“You can read your way into a whole new narrative for yourself” Margot promised.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“I turned to memory, knowing full well that it is revisionist and that each time we remember something, we alter it slightly, massaging our perspective and layering it with new understanding in order to make meaning in the present.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“His response was incomprehensible to me. How could you not want to know...Wasn't curiosity a simple fact of human nature?”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“The lonely feeling comes from not feeling known.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“I knew only what pleased my mother; I didn't have a moral compass. It would be years before I understood the forces that shaped who she was and who I became and recognized the hurt that we both caused.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“Blink, and you’ll miss your treasure. Blink again, and you’ll realize that the truth you thought was completely hidden, has materialized some ungainly part of it revealed under new conditions.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“lay there fresh and raw from having been carved open to bring her granddaughter into the world—the past ran me down. I had a vision like the kind people describe when they’re near death. For one brief second, it was as if a curtain had been lifted. I saw a long line of people, faceless in the distance, familiar as they got closer: my great-grandparents, my grandparents, my parents. I was at the front of this row of human dominoes, my infant in my arms, and as my forefathers and -mothers toppled behind me, they pushed the next generation into motion. There was no escape; their collective weight would crush me and my baby. I had started out as an egg inside Malabar, just as she had begun as an egg inside Vivian, and so on, each of our fates charted from the depths of our mothers. What little I knew about my grandparents and great-grandparents had been constructed around a sturdy fact or two, embellished perhaps by a shy smile in a grainy photograph or an underlined sentence in a book or letter. The specifics of their lives would remain unknown to me, as mine would be to the baby I held. But our collective history would shape my daughter, and there was something noxious in our matrilineal line. Malabar was the only mother I had, but she was not the mother I wanted to be. Here was my choice: I could continue down the well-trod path upon which I’d been running for so very long and pass along this inheritance like a baton, as blithely as I did my light hair and fair skin. My daughter could do her best to outrun it. She would grow up to be beautiful and smart and agile, as I used to be, as her grandparents were, as her great-grandparents were before them. Or I could slow down, catch my breath, and look mindfully for a new path. There had to be another way and I owed it to my daughter to find it.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“I felt as if I were watching myself from above, unable to comprehend the happiness of the people around me.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“But I also found my depression tedious - tedious to live through, tedious to explain, tedious to be around. I was bored by my own relentless loop and felt sure I was boring everyone around me.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“In our family, being right trumped being truthful. There was no room for uncertainty, so you never let down your guard.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“A little lift meant a little fall; a bigger lift, a bigger fall.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“Does your life feel authentically your own?”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“Desperate to become enriched by books, I sometimes barely remembered what I'd read, yet the unconscious effect of so many sentences felt cumulative, like recurring dreams.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“Piece of cake," she said. "Your mother's just lonely."
I was dumbfounded. Malabar had dinner parties almost every weekend; she had been juggling two men for years. "My mother's not lonely," I said.
"You're wrong," said Kyra. "Loneliness is not about how many people you have around. It's about whether or not you feel connected. Whether or not you're able to be yourself."
I was at a loss for words. Was Malabar not being herself when she was being Malabar?
"You know what I mean," Kyra said, breaking it down for me. "The lonely feeling comes from not being known.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“It was as if a lifetime's worth of emotional chutes and trapdoors installed for self-protection decades ago had malfunctioned in a spectacular way.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“I'd not felt so much as a pinprick of foreboding or dark premonition about what lay beyond the curve of time.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“If there was one truth that I'd learned from all my reading, it was this: Happy endings do not apply to everyone. Someone is always left out of that final, jubilant scene. This time, that someone was me.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“Jack didn't happen to me: I happened to Jack.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“You can read your way into a whole new narrative for yourself." Margot promised.”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me
“Loneliness is not about how many people you have around. It’s about whether or not you feel connected. Whether”
Adrienne Brodeur, Wild Game: My Mother, Her Lover, and Me

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