What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures Quotes

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What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures by Malcolm Gladwell
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“Good writing does not succeed or fail on the strength of its ability to persuade. It succeeds or fails on the strength of its ability to engage you, to make you think, to give you a glimpse into someone else's head.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“Nothing frustrates me more than someone who reads something of mine or anyone else's and says, angrily, 'I don't buy it.' Why are they angry? Good writing does not succeed or fail on the strength of its ability to persuade. It succeeds or fails on the strength of its ability to engage you, to make you think, to give you a glimpse into someone else's head—even if in the end you conclude that someone else's head is not a place you'd really like to be.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“What does it say about a society that it devotes more care and patience to the selection of those who handle its money than of those who handle its children?”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“The ethics of plagiarism have turned into the narcissism of small differences: because journalism cannot own up to its heavily derivative nature, it must enforce originality on the level of the sentence.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“You don't manage a social wrong. You should be ending it.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“Good writing does not succeed or fail on the strength of its ability to persuade...It succeeds or fails on the strength of its ability to engage you, to make you think, to give you a glimpse into someone else's head - even if in the end you conclude that someone else's head is not a place you're really like to be.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“Happiness, in one sense, is a function of how closely our world conforms to the infinite variety of human preference.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“To a worm in horseradish, the world is horseradish.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“I think when one's working, one works between absolute confidence and absolute doubt, and I got a huge dallop of each.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“No amount of observations of white swans can allow the inference that all swans are white, but the observation of a single black swan is sufficient to refute that conclusion.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“Words belong to the person who wrote them”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“Why is a two-year-old so terrible? Because she is systematically testing the fascinating and, to her, utterly novel notion that something that gives her pleasure might not actually give someone else pleasure—and the truth is that as adults we never lose that fascination.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“There is more courage and heroism in defying the human impulse, in taking the purposeful and painful steps to prepare for the unimaginable.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“The talent myth assumes that people make organizations smart. More often than not, it’s the other way around.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“Taleb likes to invoke
Popper: 'No amount of observations
of white swans can allow the inference
that all swans are white, but the observation
of a single black swan is sufficient
to refute that conclusion.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“Eric Hanushek, an economist at Stanford, estimates that the students of a very bad teacher will learn, on average, half a year’s worth of material in one school year. The students in the class of a very good teacher will learn a year and a half’s worth of material. That difference amounts to a year’s worth of learning in a single year. Teacher effects dwarf school effects: your child is actually better off in a bad school with an excellent teacher than in an excellent school with a bad teacher.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“Narcissists typically make judgments with greater confidence than other people… and, because their judgments are rendered with such conviction, other people tend to believe them and the narcissists become disproportionately more influential in group situations. Finally, because of their self-confidence and strong need for recognition, narcissists tend to “self-nominate”; consequently, when a leadership gap appears in a group or organization, the narcissists rush to fill it.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“If a revolution is not accessible, tangible, and replicable, how on earth can it be a revolution?”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“Everything that can be tested must be tested,”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“In teaching, the implications are even more profound. They suggest that we shouldn’t be raising standards. We should be lowering them, because there is no point in raising standards if standards don’t track with what we care about. Teaching should be open to anyone with a pulse and a college degree — and teachers should be judged after they have started their jobs, not before.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“hey hey its Brooke im 12 and having trouble my teacher told me to get on here sooo yaaa see ya soon pic uplaodin soon!!!!!!!!!!!!”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
tags: lolz
“But sometimes genius is anything but rarefied; sometimes it's just the thing that emerges after twenty years of working at your kitchen. (p313)”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“People at the top are self-conscious about what they say (and rightfully so) because they have position and privilege to protect — and self-consciousness is the enemy of “interestingness.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“You don’t start at the top if you want to find the story. You start in the middle, because it’s the people in the middle who do the actual work in the world.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“that made the unfamiliar familiar.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“The top eleven are, in order, T. S. Eliot’s “Prufrock,” Robert Lowell’s “Skunk Hour,” Robert Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening,” William Carlos Williams’s “Red Wheelbarrow,” Elizabeth Bishop’s “The Fish,” Ezra Pound’s “The River Merchant’s Wife,” Sylvia Plath’s “Daddy,” Pound’s “In a Station of the Metro,” Frost’s “Mending Wall,” Wallace Stevens’s “The Snow Man,” and Williams’s “The Dance.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“That late bloomers bloom late because they simply aren't much good until late in their careers.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“You can take a pitchman and make a great actor out of him, but you cannot take an actor and always make a great pitchman out of him,” he says. The pitchman must make you applaud and take out your money. He must be able to execute what in pitchman’s parlance is called “the turn” — the perilous, crucial moment where he goes from entertainer to businessman.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“The trick to finding ideas is to convince yourself that everyone and everything has a story to tell. I say trick but what I mean is challenge, because it’s a very hard thing to do. Our instinct as humans, after all, is to assume that most things are not interesting. We flip through the channels on the television and reject ten before settle on one. We go to a bookstore and look at twenty novels before we pick the one we want. We filter and rank and judge. We have to. There’s so much out there. But if you want to be a writer, you have to fight that instinct every day. Shampoo doesn’t seem interesting? Well, dammit, it must be, and if it isn’t, I have to believe that it will ultimately lead me to something that is.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures
“A certain property fundamentalism, having no connection to our tradition, now reigns in this culture.”
Malcolm Gladwell, What the Dog Saw and Other Adventures

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