Life's That Way Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
Life's That Way Life's That Way by Jim Beaver
1,186 ratings, 4.52 average rating, 272 reviews
Open Preview
Life's That Way Quotes Showing 1-21 of 21
“Today we fight. Tomorrow we fight. The day after, we fight. And if this disease plans on whipping us, it better bring a lunch, 'cause it's gonna have a long day doing it.”
Jim Beaver, Life's That Way
“While I was drying off Maddie after her bath tonight, she said, 'I love you' to me for the first time. It sounded like 'All lub boo,' but I didn't care. To reciprocate, I showed her what an ex-Marine looks like when he cries.”
Jim Beaver, Life's That Way
“Forgiveness is not something you do for someone else; it's something you do for yourself. To forgive is not to condone, it is to refuse to continue feeling bad about an injury.”
Jim Beaver, Life's That Way
“April 11, 2004

Does anyone know where I can find a copy of the rules of thought, feeling, and behavior in these circumstances? It seems like there should be a rule book somewhere that lays out everything exactly the way one should respond to a loss like this. I'd surely like to know if I'm doing it right. Am I whining enough or too much? Am I unseemly in my occasional moments of lightheartedness? At what date and I supposed to turn off the emotion and jump back on the treadmill of normalcy? Is there a specific number of days or decades that must pass before I can do something I enjoy without feeling I've betrayed my dearest love? And when, oh when, am I ever really going to believe this has happened? Next time you're in a bookstore, as if there's a rule book.

11:54 p.m.

Jim”
Jim Beaver, Life's That Way
“How incredibly far our lives drift from where we knew with all certainty they would go. How little today resembles what yesterday thought it would look like.”
Jim Beaver, Life's That Way
tags: fate, jim, life
“Of all the things I've ever done, perhaps none was more difficult than turning away from my beautiful girl and walking away, leaving her there, never to look back. But my friend Tom, my ever-faithful good friend Tom said, pointing down the hall away from Cec's room, 'Life's that way. Let's go home.'

And so we did.”
Jim Beaver, Life's That Way
“Life's that way -->”
Jim Beaver, Life's That Way
“How can it be that there is such a colossal gap between what we think we know about grief and mourning and what we actually find out when it comes to us?”
Jim Beaver, Life's That Way
“I will bear this grief, I will endure it. I will reach a point where it doesn't kick me down an abyss whenever I turn my back on it.”
Jim Beaver, Life's That Way
tags: grief
“I've attempted to flood the path with light where I could, and where I could not I've wanted at least to hold up a candle so that others coming this way might not stumble too painfully.”
Jim Beaver, Life's That Way
“Some people take a of light with them when they go, yet seem to leave things brighter nonetheless.”
Jim Beaver, Life's That Way
“A kind of Providence keeps us blind to the intensity of suffering so as to keep us sane, until that day when the suffering is our own or that of someone we love beyond imagining.”
Jim Beaver, Life's That Way
“Just because she's brave doesn't mean she's fearless.”
Jim Beaver, Life's That Way
“On the other hand, comfort of a sort is providable. It consists in large part of copping to the inability to be comforting. As contradictory as this seems, I (and, I’m told, many other people) have found it immeasurably more helpful for someone to say, ‘I have no idea how you must feel,’ or ‘I can’t imagine your pain.’ Just saying this and making clear that you hear and acknowledge the pain, though you have no answers, goes light-years beyond any attempt to repair a griever’s spirits. The knowledge of a loving soul’s presence and willingness to be present and to hear and absorb one’s grief is a powerful resource for the griever. I’ve had more comfort from people saying, ‘I don’t know what to say,’ than from a hundred people telling me good reasons I shouldn’t feel as bad as I do. I know that whatever is said to a griever by concerned friends, whether ultimately helpful or distressing, comes from the very best of intentions. But if you happen on a broken heart, stand nearby, whisper, ‘I’m here,’ and never, ever, tell it you know how it feels.”
Jim Beaver, Life's That Way
“With all the thousands upon thousands of people suffering from this disease, how can I find her pain and mine so surprising, so unexpected? How can we not all know about this stuff on a daily basis, if so many go through it? Are we all really so isolated from the trauma and torment around us? People in my own family have gone through this. I’ve sat by the deathbeds of friends who lived every moment of this. Yet this is all so utterly unexpected and so much more than I believed it could be. It’s like having lived all one’s life in a cavern, only to have the harsh light of a thousand suns blasted in upon you. Except this light is dark, pitch-dark, and throbs rather than pierces. How can I not have known what so many people have gone through? The only answer I can conjure is that a kind Providence keeps us blind to the intensity of suffering so as to keep us sane, until that day when the suffering is our own or that of someone we love beyond imagining.”
Jim Beaver, Life's That Way
tags: cancer
“Pray, hum, and give a ferocious hug to the ones you love most. You never know when you might want that hug with all your soul, and not be able to give it or get it.”
Jim Beaver, Life's That Way
“Kahlil Gibran put it, ‘Joy and sorrow are inseparable . . . together they come and when one sits alone with you . . . remember that the other is asleep upon your bed.”
Jim Beaver, Life's That Way
tags: joy, sorrow
“Ephesians 4:26—‘Let not the sun go down upon your wrath.”
Jim Beaver, Life's That Way
“No one is completely useless. You can always serve as a bad example.”
Jim Beaver, Life's That Way
“Be cautious what you say you cannot stand; fate may well feel compelled to teach you just how much more you can.”
Jim Beaver, Life's That Way
“I’ve learned there are no stages to grief. The famous stages of dying (denial, anger, bargaining, acceptance, etc.) apply to people who are dying, not grieving people. Grieving people don’t deny for more than a moment that their loved one has died. They don’t bargain with the universe; it’s too late for bargaining. And anger, acceptance, all the other so-called stages don’t come to a griever in stages. They wash over a griever, as though they were items of clothing in a washing machine, each rubbing and passing over the griever in turn, simultaneously, repeatedly. Anyone saying you are in a certain ‘stage’ of grieving, or, worse, that you are ‘supposed to be’ in a certain stage needs to be taken out and sh—well, needs to be nodded at and forgiven, I suppose.”
Jim Beaver, Life's That Way