Faust Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World Volume 1 Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World Volume 1 by E.A. Bucchianeri
6 ratings, 4.67 average rating, 1 review
Faust Quotes Showing 1-9 of 9
“Faustus, who embraced evil and shunned righteousness, became the foremost symbol of the misuse of free will, that sublime gift from God with its inherent opportunity to choose virtue and reject iniquity. “What shall a man gain if he has the whole world and lose his soul,” (Matt. 16: v. 26) - but for a notorious name, the ethereal shadow of a career, and a brief life of fleeting pleasure with no true peace? This was the blackest and most captivating tragedy of all, few could have remained indifferent to the growing intrigue of this individual who apparently shook hands with the devil and freely chose to descend to the molten, sulphuric chasm of Hell for all eternity for so little in exchange. It is a drama that continues to fascinate today as powerfully as when Faustus first disseminated his infamous card in the Heidelberg locale to the scandal of his generation. In fine, a life of good or evil, the hope of Heaven or the despair of Hell, Faustus stands as a reminder that the choice between these two absolutes also falls to us.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World Volume 1
“To be, or not to be: what a question!”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World: Volume I
“God Is, Lucifer is a devil, and there is a Hell.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World Volume 1
“Thus, Marlowe posed the silent question: could aspiring Icarus be happy with a toilsome life on land managing a plough with plodding oxen having once tasted the weightless bliss of flight?”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World: Volume I
“If there are damned souls in Hell, it is because men blind themselves.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World Volume 1
“... the lofty mind of man can be imprisoned by the artifices of its own making.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World: Volume I
“In fine, a life of good or evil, the hope of Heaven or the despair of Hell, Faustus stands as a reminder that the choice between these two absolutes also falls to us.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World Volume 1
“... Faustus ... dared to confirm he had advanced beyond the level of a scarlet sinner — he was a conscious follower of the Prince of Darkness. The fact he could publicly project an Antichrist image with pride, having no fear of reprisal, and his seeming diabolical art of escaping all punishment when others who were considered heretics had burned at the stake for less, would certainly signal that an unnatural individual walked in their midst. It is true in many respects he assumed the role of the charlatan, yet how apropos, considering his willingness to follow his ‘brother-in-law’ known as the Father of Lies and deception.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World: Volume I
“(Marlowe's) Faustus stubbornly reverts to his atheistic beliefs and continues his elementary pagan re-education ~ the inferno to him is a 'place' invented by men.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Faust: My Soul Be Damned for the World: Volume I