Plexus Quotes

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Plexus (The Rosy Crucifixion, #2) Plexus by Henry Miller
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Plexus Quotes Showing 1-9 of 9
“If I were reading a book and happened to strike a wonderful passage I would close the book then and there and go for a walk. I hated the thought of coming to the end of a good book. I would tease it along, delay the inevitable as long as possible, But always, when I hit a great passage, I would stop reading immediately. Out I would go, rain, hail, snow or ice, and chew the cud.”
Henry Miller, Plexus
“My hunger and curiosity drive me forward in all directions at once.”
Henry Miller, Plexus
“Better to separate than never to marry.”
Henry Miller, Plexus
“Why do we wear out so quickly, when the elements of which we are composed are indestructible? What is it that wears out? Not that of which we are made, that is certain. We wither and fade away, we perish, because the desire to live is extinguished. And why does this most potent flame die out? For lack of faith. From the time we are born we are told that we are mortal. From the time we are able to understand words we are taught that we must kill in order to survive. In season and out we are reminded that, no matter how intelligently, reasonably or wisely we live, we shall become sick and die. We are inoculated with the idea of death almost from birth. Is it any wonder that we die?”
Henry Miller, Plexus
“Man will change nothing of his final destiny, which is to return sooner or later to the unconscious and the formless.”
Henry Miller, Plexus
“In her tight-fitting Persian dress, with turban to match, she looked ravishing.”
Henry Miller, Plexus
“Heroism and obscenity appear no more important in the life of the universe than the fighting or mating of a pair of insects in the woods. All is on the same plane.”
Henry Miller, Plexus
“We ought to remind ourselves daily, repeat it like a litany, that in our being lies concealed the whole gamut of existence... Above all, we should cease postponing the act of becoming what in fact and essence we are.”
Henry Miller, Plexus
“In vacuum one has no need for new things, nor of excitement, nor of foreign stimuli. One has only to maintain a bare survival, to vegetate, like a fetus in a jar.”
Henry Miller, Plexus