Emotional Intelligence Quotes

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Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman
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Emotional Intelligence Quotes Showing 1-30 of 188
“In a very real sense we have two minds, one that thinks and one that feels”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
“Anyone can become angry —that is easy. But to be angry with the right person, to the right degree, at the right time, for the right purpose, and in the right way —this is not easy. ARISTOTLE, The Nicomachean Ethics”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
“A belligerent samurai, an old Japanese tale goes, once challenged a Zen master to explain the concept of heaven and hell. The monk replied with scorn, "You're nothing but a lout - I can't waste my time with the likes of you!"
His very honor attacked, the samurai flew into a rage and, pulling his sword from its scabbard, yelled "I could kill you for your impertinence."
"That," the monk calmly replied, "is hell."
Startled at seeing the truth in what the master pointed out about the fury that had him in its grip, the samurai calmed down, sheathed his sword, and bowed, thanking the monk for the insight.
"And that,"said the monk "is heaven."

The sudden awakening of the samurai to his own agitated state illustrates the crucial difference between being caught up in a feeling and becoming aware that you are being swept away by it. Socrates's injunction "Know thyself" speaks to the keystone of emotional intelligence: awareness of one's own feelings as they occur.”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
“people's emotions are rarely put into words , far more often they are expressed through other cues.
the key to intuiting another's feelings is in the ability to read nonverbal channels , tone of voice , gesture , facial expression and the like”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
“Emotional self-control-- delaying gratification and stifling impulsiveness- underlies accomplishment of every sort”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
“Life is a comedy for those who think and a tragedy for those who feel. HORACE WALPOLE”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence
“Our emotional mind will harness the rational mind to its purposes, for our feelings and reactions-- rationalizations-- justifying them in terms of the present moment, without realizing the influence of our emotional memory.”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
“But the rational mind usually doesn't decide what emotions we "should" have !”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
“emotional self-awareness is the building block of the next fundamental emotional intelligence: being able to shake off a bad mood”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
“Leadership is not domination, but the art of persuading people to work toward a common goal.”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence
“Feelings are self-justifying, with a set of perceptions and "proofs" all their own.”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
“There is perhaps no psychological skill more fundamental than resisting impulse.”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence
“Benjamin Franklin put it well: “Anger is never without a reason, but seldom a good one.”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence
“When we are in the grip of craving or fury, head-over-heals in love our recoiling in dread, it is the limbic system that has us in its grip.”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
“People with well-developed emotional skills are also more likely to be content and effective in their lives, mastering the habits of mind that foster their own productivity; people who cannot marshal some control over their emotional life fight inner battles that sabotage their ability for focused work and clear thought.”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence
“Helping people better manage their upsetting feelings—anger, anxiety, depression, pessimism, and loneliness—is a form of disease prevention. Since the data show that the toxicity of these emotions, when chronic, is on a par with smoking cigarettes, helping people handle them better could potentially have a medical payoff as great as getting heavy smokers to quit.”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence
“Fear, in evolution, has a special prominence: perhaps more than any other emotion it is crucial for survival.”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
“A child's readiness for school depends on the most basic of all knowledge, how to learn. The report lists the seven key ingredients of this crucial capacity—all related to emotional intelligence:6 1. Confidence. A sense of control and mastery of one's body, behavior, and world; the child's sense that he is more likely than not to succeed at what he undertakes, and that adults will be helpful. 2. Curiosity. The sense that finding out about things is positive and leads to pleasure. 3. Intentionality. The wish and capacity to have an impact, and to act upon that with persistence. This is related to a sense of competence, of being effective. 4. Self-control. The ability to modulate and control one's own actions in age-appropriate ways; a sense of inner control. 5. Relatedness. The ability to engage with others based on the sense of being understood by and understanding others. 6. Capacity to communicate. The wish and ability to verbally exchange ideas, feelings, and concepts with others. This is related to a sense of trust in others and of pleasure in engaging with others, including adults. 7. Cooperativeness. The ability to balance one's own needs with those of others in group activity. Whether or not a child arrives at school on the first day of kindergarten with these capabilities depends greatly on how much her parents—and preschool teachers—have given her the kind of care that amounts to a "Heart Start," the emotional equivalent of the Head Start programs.”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
“People’s beliefs about their abilities have a profound effect on those abilities. Ability is not a fixed property; there is a huge variability in how you perform. People who have a sense of self-efficacy bounce back from failures; they approach things in terms of how to handle them rather than worrying about what can go wrong.”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence
“For better or worse, intelligence can come to nothing when the emotions hold sway.”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence
“أننا لا شعورياً نقلد الانفعالات التي يظهرها أمامنا شخص آخر عن طريق محاكاة حركية لا واعية لتعبيرات الوجه وإيماءاته ونبرات صوته والمحددات غير اللفظية الأخرى للانفاعلات، وبهذه المحاكاة يعيد الأشخاص في داخلهم خلق هذه الحالات المزاجية للشخص الآخر. وهي صورة مبسطة من طريقة ستانيسلافسكي والذي كان يطلب من الممثلين أن يتذكروا الإماءات والحركات والتعبيرات الأخرى لانفعال أثر فيهم بقوة في الماضي من أجل استثارة هذه المشاعر مرة أخرى.”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
“Life is a comedy for those who think and a tragedy for those who feel.”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
“إن الخوف ربما الشعور الأكثر أهمية للحفاظ على البقاء!”
دانيال جولمان, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
“many people with IQs of 160 work for people with IQs of 100, if the former have poor intrapersonal intelligence and the latter have a high one.”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence
“We transmit and catch moods from each other in what amounts to a subterranean economy of the psyche in which some encounters are toxic, some nourishing.”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
“goal-directed self-imposed delay of gratification" is perhaps the essence of emotional self-regulation: the ability to deny impulse in the service of a goal, whether it be building a business, solving an algebraic equation, or pursuing the Stanley Cup. His finding underscores the role of emotional intelligence as a meta-ability, determining how well or how poorly people are able to use their other mental capacities.”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
“The guiding visionary behind Project Spectrum is Howard Gardner, a psychologist at the Harvard School of Education.7 “The time has come,” Gardner told me, “to broaden our notion of the spectrum of talents. The single most important contribution education can make to a child’s development is to help him toward a field where his talents best suit him, where he will be satisfied and competent. We’ve completely lost sight of that. Instead we subject everyone to an education where, if you succeed, you will be best suited to be a college professor. And we evaluate everyone along the way according to whether they meet that narrow standard of success. We should spend less time ranking children and more time helping them to identify their natural competencies and gifts, and cultivate those. There are hundreds and hundreds of ways to succeed, and many, many different abilities that will help you get there.”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence
“Once when I was about 13, in an angry fit, I walked out of the house vowing I would never return. It was a beautiful summer day, and I walked far along lovely lanes, till gradually the stillness and beauty calmed and soothed me, and after some hours I returned repentant and almost melted. Since then when I am angry, I do this if I can, and find it the best cure.”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
“[Sadness] enforces a kind of reflective retreat from life's busy pursuits, and leaves us in a suspended state to mourn the loss, mull over its meaning, and, finally, make the psychological adjustments and new plans that will allow our lives to continue”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
“If there is a remedy, I feel it must lie in how we prepare our young for life.”
Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence

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