The Letters of Virginia Woolf Quotes

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The Letters of Virginia Woolf: Volume Three, 1923-1928 The Letters of Virginia Woolf: Volume Three, 1923-1928 by Virginia Woolf
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The Letters of Virginia Woolf Quotes Showing 1-7 of 7
“I am reading six books at once, the only way of reading; since, as you will agree, one book is only a single unaccompanied note, and to get the full sound, one needs ten others at the same time.”
Virginia Woolf, The Letters of Virginia Woolf: Volume Three, 1923-1928
“Style is a very simple matter: it is all rhythm. Once you get that, you can't use the wrong words. But on the other hand here am I sitting after half the morning, crammed with ideas, and visions, and so on, and can't dislodge them, for lack of the right rhythm. Now this is very profound, what rhythm is, and goes far deeper than words. A sight, an emotion, creates this wave in the mind, long before it makes words to fit it; and in writing (such is my present belief) one has to recapture this, and set this working (which has nothing apparently to do with words) and then, as it breaks and tumbles in the mind, it makes words to fit it. But no doubt I shall think differently next year.”
Virginia Woolf, The Letters of Virginia Woolf: Volume Three, 1923-1928
“The better a thing is expressed, the more completely it is thought. (1/9/1925 - From a Letter to Janet Case)”
Virginia Woolf, The Letters of Virginia Woolf: Volume Three, 1923-1928
“Talk of solitude (...). It is the last resort of the civilised: our souls are so creased and soured in meaning we can only unfold them when we are alone. (5/4/1927 - From a Letter to Vita Sackville-West)”
Virginia Woolf, The Letters of Virginia Woolf: Volume Three, 1923-1928
“There is a certain 'beauty' in illness - one is alone - one reads - one thinks - one sees only the people one like seeing. (27 (?)/5/1928) - From a Letter to Duncan Grant)”
Virginia Woolf, The Letters of Virginia Woolf: Volume Three, 1923-1928
“But this I can never explain to a painter, I suppose; how words live in companies, never used, exept when one writes. (5/2/1925 - From a letter to Jacques Raverat)”
Virginia Woolf, The Letters of Virginia Woolf: Volume Three, 1923-1928
“My position is quite simple. If the house is on fire one does not ask first who is to be blamed for the conflagration; one puts it out. My heart is afire.”
Virginia Woolf, The Letters of Virginia Woolf: Volume Three, 1923-1928