The Trouble with Being Born Quotes

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The Trouble with Being Born The Trouble with Being Born by Emil M. Cioran
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“It is not worth the bother of killing yourself, since you always kill yourself too late.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“What do you do from morning to night?"

"I endure myself.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“A zoologist who observed gorillas in their native habitat was amazed by the uniformity of their life and their vast idleness. Hours and hours without doing anything. Was boredom unknown to them? This is indeed a question raised by a human, a busy ape. Far from fleeing monotony, animals crave it, and what they most dread is to see it end. For it ends, only to be replaced by fear, the cause of all activity. Inaction is divine; yet it is against inaction that man has rebelled. Man alone, in nature, is incapable of enduring monotony, man alone wants something to happen at all costs — something, anything.... Thereby he shows himself unworthy of his ancestor: the need for novelty is the characteristic of an alienated gorilla.”
E. M. Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
tags: life
“The same feeling of not belonging, of futility, wherever I go: I pretend interest in what matters nothing to me, I bestir myself mechanically or out of charity, without ever being caught up, without ever being somewhere. What attracts me is elsewhere, and I don’t know where that elsewhere is.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“Sometimes I wish I were a cannibal – less for the pleasure of eating someone than for the pleasure of vomiting him.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“Do I look like someone who has something to do here on earth?' —That's what I'd like to answer the busybodies who inquire into my activities.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“When people come to me saying they want to kill themselves, I tell them, “What’s your rush? You can kill yourself any time you like. So calm down. Suicide is a positive act.” And they do calm down.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“To have committed every crime but that of being a father.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“To get up in the morning, wash and then wait for some unforeseen variety of dread or depression.
I would give the whole universe and all of Shakespeare for a grain of ataraxy.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“What I know at sixty, I knew as well at twenty. Forty years of a long, a superfluous, labor of verification.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“Each time I fail to think about death, I have the impression of cheating, of deceiving someone in me.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“Better to be an animal than a man, an insect than an animal, a plant than an insect, and so on.

Salvation? Whatever diminishes the kingdom of consciousness and compromises its supremacy.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“Having always lived in fear of being surprised by the worst, I have tried in every circumstance to get a head start, flinging myself into misfortune long before it occurred.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“We have lost, being born, as much as we shall lose dying: Everything!”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“This very second has vanished forever, lost in the anonymous mass of the irrevocable. It will never return. I suffer from this, and I do not. Everything is unique—and insignificant.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“There was a time when time did not yet exist. … The rejection of birth is nothing but the nostalgia for this time before time.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“I get along quite well with someone only when he is at his lowest point and has neither the desire nor the strength to restore his habitual illusions.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“To claim you are more detached, more alien to everything than anyone, and to be merely a fanatic of indifference!”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“As the years pass, the number of those we can communicate with diminishes. When there is no longer anyone to talk to, at last we will be as we were before stooping to a name.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“I react like everyone else, even like those I most despise; but I make up for it by deploring every action I commit, good or bad.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“If I used to ask myself, over a coffin: “What good did it do the occupant to be born?”, I now put the same question about anyone alive.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“I have never taken myself for a being. A non-citizen, a marginal type, a nothing who exists only by the excess, by the superabundance of his nothingness.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“For a long while I have lived with the notion that I was the most normal being that ever existed. This notion gave me the taste, even the passion for being unproductive: what was the use of being prized in a world inhabited by madmen, a world mired in mania and stupidity? For whom was one to bother, and to what end? It remains to be seen if I have quite freed myself from this certitude, salvation in the absolute, ruin in the immediate.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“If death had only negative aspects, dying would be an unmanageable action.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“We do not rush toward death, we flee the catastrophe of birth, survivors struggling to forget it. Fear of death is merely the projection into the future of a fear which dates back to our first moment of life.
We are reluctant, of course, to treat birth as a scourge: has it not been inculcated as the sovereign good—have we not been told that the worst came at the end, not at the outset of our lives? Yet evil, the real evil, is behind, not ahead of us. What escaped Jesus did not escape Buddha: “If three things did not exist in the world, O disciples, the Perfect One would not appear in the world. …” And ahead of old age and death he places the fact of birth, source of every infirmity, every disaster.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“At this very moment, I am suffering—as we say in French, j’ai mal. This event, crucial for me, is nonexistent, even inconceivable for anyone else, for everyone else. Except for God, if that word can have a meaning.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“Having destroyed all my connections, burned my bridges, I should feel a certain freedom, and in fact I do. One so intense I am afraid to rejoice in it.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“It has been a long time since philosophers have read men’s souls. It is not their task, we are told. Perhaps. But we must not be surprised if they no longer matter much to us.”
Émile Michel Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“I am for the most part so convinced that everything is lacking in basis, consequence, justification, that if someone dared to contradict me, even the man I most admire, he would seem to me a charlatan or a fool.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born
“Everything exists; nothing exists. Either formula affords a like serenity. The man of anxiety, to his misfortune, remains between them, trembling and perplexed, forever at the mercy of a nuance, incapable of gaining a foothold in the security of being or in the absence of being.”
Emil Cioran, The Trouble with Being Born

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