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When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing by Daniel H. Pink
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“coffee-then-nap combination known as the “nappuccino.”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“Afternoons are the Bermuda Triangles of our days. Across many domains, the trough represents a danger zone for productivity, ethics, and health.”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“decisions and negotiations, should be conducted earlier in the day”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“Until about ten years ago, we admired those who could survive on only four hours of sleep and those stalwarts who worked through the night. They were heroes, people whose fierce devotion and commitment revealed everyone else’s fecklessness and frailty. Then, as sleep science reached the mainstream, we began to change our attitude. That sleepless guy wasn’t a hero. He was a fool. He was likely doing subpar work and maybe hurting the rest of us because of his poor choices. Breaks are now where sleep was then. Skipping lunch was once a badge of honor and taking a nap a mark of shame. No more. The science of timing now affirms what the Old World already understood: We should give ourselves a break.”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“if we stick with a task too long, we lose sight of the goal”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“Psychological detachment from work, in addition to physical detachment, is crucial”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“coffee, followed by a nap of ten to twenty minutes, is the ideal technique”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“elite performers have something in common: They’re really good at taking breaks”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“If you want a happy ending, that depends, of course, on where you stop your story. —ORSON WELLES”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“the typical worker reaches the most unproductive moment of the day at 2:55 p.m.”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“High performers, its research concludes, work for fifty-two minutes and then break for seventeen minutes.”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“start planning how to achieve those top five goals. And the other twenty? Get rid of them.”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“If you’ve got an extra minute left, send someone—anyone—a thank-you e-mail.”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“The best endings don’t leave us happy. Instead, they produce something richer—a rush of unexpected insight, a fleeting moment of transcendence, the possibility that by discarding what we wanted we’ve gotten what we need.”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“E-mail response time is the single best predictor of whether employees are satisfied with their boss, according to research by Duncan Watts, a Columbia University sociologist who is now a principal researcher for Microsoft Research. The longer it takes for a boss to respond to their e-mails, the less satisfied people are with their leader.1”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“Breaks are not a sign of sloth but a sign of strength”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“Temporal landmarks slow our thinking, allowing us to deliberate at a higher level and make better decisions”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“If you’re an educator, know that all times are not created equal:”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“frequent short breaks are more effective than occasional ones”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“Say it with me now, brothers and sisters: Lunch is the most important meal”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“Jobs that are demanding but don’t offer autonomy burn us out.”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“People born in the fall and winter are more likely to be larks;”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“I call time-outs like these “vigilance breaks”—brief pauses before high-stakes encounters to review instructions and guard against error.”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“take meaningful restorative breaks”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“The problem is that our corporate, government, and education cultures are configured for the 75 or 80 percent of people who are larks or third birds. Owls are like left-handers in a right-handed world—forced to use scissors and writing desks and catcher’s mitts designed for others. How they respond is the final piece of the puzzle in divining the rhythms of the day.”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“Each of us has a “chronotype”—a personal pattern of circadian rhythms that influences our physiology and psychology.”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“We simply don’t take issues of when as seriously as we take questions of what”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“maybe those decisions were bad because he made them in the afternoon”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“The Power of Breaks, the Promise of Lunch, and the Case for a Modern Siesta”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
“99 percent of us cannot multitask.”
Daniel H. Pink, When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing

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