On the Come Up Quotes

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On the Come Up On the Come Up by Angie Thomas
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On the Come Up Quotes Showing 1-30 of 50
“Jay’s a people person. I’m more of a “yes, people exist, but that doesn’t mean I need to talk to them” person.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“There's only so much you can take being described as somebody you're not.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“Church is full of people with plenty to say and nothing to do. You’d think some of them would help us instead of talk about us, but I guess it’s easy to say you love Jesus and harder to act like him.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“I'm more of a "yes, people exist, but that doesn't mean I need to talk to them" person.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“It is kinda messed up. Here my brother is, doing everything right, and nothing's coming from it. Meanwhile, Aunt Pooh's doing everything we've been told not to do, and she's giving us food when we need it.

That's how it goes though. The drug dealers in my neighborhood aren't struggling. Everybody else is.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“What the hell? I swear, this shit is like quicksand—the harder we try to get out, the harder it is to get out.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“Let be real: We're black kids from one of the worst neighborhoods in the city. All it takes is one of us messing up, and suddenly all of us messed up.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“Sometimes she's my personal Yoda. If Yoda was a woman and had a gold grill. Unfortunately, she doesn't know who Yoda is.”
Angie Thomas , On the Come Up
“I’ve always had this theory that God is a sitcom writer who loves to put me in ridiculous situations.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“People need to get their space opera life right.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“We can't have any power, either. I mean, think about it. All these people I've never met have way more control over my life than I've ever had. If some Crown hadn't killed my dad, he'd be a big rap star and money wouldn't be an issue. If some drug dealer hadn't sold my mom her first hit, she could've gotten her degree already and would have a good job. If that cop hadn't murdered that boy, people wouldn't have rioted, the daycare wouldn't have burned down, and the church wouldn't have let Jay go.

All these folks I've never met became gods over my life. Now I gotta take the power back.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“That’s when I learned that when people die, they sometimes take the living with them.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“But it's kinda like saying one side of the Death Star is safer than the other. It's still the goddamn Death Star.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“All these folks I've never met became gods over my life. Now I gotta take the power back.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“High school ain't the end or the beginning. It ain't even in the middle. You 'bout to do big things, whether they see it or not. I see it. Everybody last night saw it. Long as you see it, that's all that matters.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“My apologies, see, I forgot my manners.
I get on the mic ’cause it’s my life. You show off for girls and cameras.
You a pop star, not a rapper. A Vanilla Ice or a Hammer.
Y’all hear this crap he dumping out? Somebody get him a Pamper.
And a crown for me. The best have heard about me.
You can only spell “brilliant” by first spelling Bri.
You see, naturally, I do my shit with perfection.
Better call a bodyguard ’cause you gon’ need some protection,
And on this here election, the people crown a new leader.
You didn’t see this coming, and your ghostwriters didn’t either.
I came here to ether. I’m sorry to do this to you.
This is no longer a battle, it’s your funeral, boo. I’m murdering you.
On my corner they call me coroner, I’m warning ya.
Tell the truth, this dude is borin’ ya.
You confused like a foreigner. I’ll explain with ease:
You’re just a casualty in the reality of the madness of Bri.
No fallacies, I spit maladies, causin’ fatalities,
And do it casually, damaging rappers without bandaging.
Imagining managing my own label, my own salary.
And actually, factually, there’s no MC that’s as bad as me.
Milez? That’s cute. But it don’t make me cower.
I move at light speed, you stuck at per hour.
You spit like a lisp. I spit like a high power.
Bri’s the future, and you Today like Matt Lauer.
You coward. But you’re a G? It ain’t convincing to me.
You talk about your clothes, about your shopping sprees.
You talk about your Glock, about your i-c-e.
But in this here ring, they all talking ’bout me,
Bri!”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“.I mean, it's one thing to wanna do something. It's another to think it's possible. Rapping has been my dream forever, but dreams aren't real. You wake up from them or reality makes them seem stupid. Trust, every time my fridge is almost empty, all of my dreams seem stupid.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“Every single time I get sent to her, she asks me questions that sound like they came from some “How to Talk to Statistical Black Children Who Come to Your Office Often” handbook.

How is your home life? (None of your business.)

Have you witnessed any traumatic events lately, such as shootings? (Just because I live in the “ghetto” doesn’t mean I dodge bullets every day.)

Are you struggling to come to terms with your father’s murder? (It was twelve years ago. I barely remember him or it.)

Are you struggling to come to terms with your mother’s addiction? (She’s been clean for eight years. She’s only addicted to soap operas these days.)

What’s good with you, homegirl, nah’mean? (Okay, she hasn’t said that, but give her time.)”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“The neighborhood doesn’t feel nearly as safe. Not that the Garden was ever a utopia, hell no, but before I only worried about GDs and Crowns. Now I gotta worry about the cops too? Yeah, people get killed around here, and nah, it’s not always by the police, but Jay says this was like having a stranger come in your house, steal one of your kids, and blame you for it because your family was dysfunctional, while the whole world judges you for being upset.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“...I'd rather see her as my hero than as somebody else's villain.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“This is Popkenchurch. Popkenchurch is when you buy fried chicken and Cajun rice from Popeyes, biscuits from KFC, and fried okra and corn on the cob from Church’s.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“Thank you for being violent on my behalf.
Aww, anytime. You know I've got your little disturbing-ass back.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“Look, you can't be worried about what folks think... There will always be someone with something to say, but it doesn't mean you gotta listen.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“I follow Grandma toward the front of the sanctuary. She and Granddaddy have a spot on the second row that’s theirs. See, the first row is for folks who wanna show off. The second row is for folks who wanna show off but wanna act like they’re subtler about it.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“You know how many rich white folks come to the courthouse on drug possession?” “A whole lot,” says Jay. “Too many,” Aunt ’Chelle says. “Every single one gets a little slap on the wrist and goes right back into society, like it’s all good. Black folks or poor folks get on drugs?” “We’re ruined for life,” Jay says”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“Um, excuse you, but Harry Potter is a cultural phenomenon.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“Occasionally she goes "Mmm" at some line the same way my grandma does during a sermon. Poetry's Mrs. Murray's religion.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“I was floating after my battle, for real. That feeling when the crowd cheered for me is probably what getting high is like, and I'm addicted.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“The Garden passes by my window. Older folks water their flowers or bring out their trash cans. A couple of cars blast music on high. Seems normal, but things haven't been the same since the riots. The neighborhood doesn't feel nearly as safe. Not that the Garden was ever a utopia, hell no, but before I only worried about GDs and Crowns. Now I gotta worry about the cops too?”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up
“A nightmare that’s a memory. Jay really did leave me and Trey at our grandparents’ house. She couldn’t take care of us and her drug habit, too. That’s when I learned that when people die, they sometimes take the living with them.

I saw her in the park a few months later, looking more like a red-eyed, scaly-skinned dragon than my mommy. I started calling her Jay after that—there was no way she was my mom anymore. It became my own habit that was hard to break. Still is.”
Angie Thomas, On the Come Up

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