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The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love by Sonya Renee Taylor
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The Body Is Not an Apology Quotes Showing 1-30 of 41
“When we say we don’t see color, what we are truly saying is, “I don’t want to see the things about you that are different because society has told me they are dangerous or undesirable.” Ignoring difference does not change society; nor does it change the experiences non-normative bodies must navigate to survive. Rendering difference invisible validates the notion that there are parts of us that should be ignored, hidden, or minimized, leaving in place the unspoken idea that difference is the problem and not our approach to dealing with difference.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“Equally damaging is our insistence that all bodies should be healthy. Health is not a state we owe the world. We are not less valuable, worthy, or lovable because we are not healthy. Lastly, there is no standard of health that is achievable for all bodies.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“When our personal value is dependent on the lesser value of other bodies, radical self-love is unachievable.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“Systems do not maintain themselves; even our lack of intervention is an act of maintenance. Every structure in every society is upheld by the active and passive assistance of other human beings.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“When we liberate ourselves from the expectation that we must have all things figured out, we enter a sanctuary of empathy.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“Living in a female body, a Black body, an aging body, a fat body, a body with mental illness is to awaken daily to a planet that expects a certain set of apologies to already live on our tongues. There is a level of “not enough” or “too much” sewn into these strands of difference.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“When we decide that people’s bodies are wrong because we don’t understand them, we are trying to avoid the discomfort of divesting from an entire body-shame system.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“there is no standard of health that is achievable for all bodies. Our belief that there should be anchors the systemic oppression of ableism and reinforces the notion that people with illnesses and disabilities have defective bodies rather than different bodies.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“Natural intelligence intends that every living thing become the highest form of itself and designs us accordingly.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“Radical self-love demands that we see ourselves and others in the fullness of our complexities and intersections and that we work to create space for those intersections.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“To be fear-facing is to learn the distinction between fear and danger. It is to look directly at the source of the fear and assess if we are truly in peril or if we are simply afraid of the unknown.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“Contrary to purpose, natural intelligence does not require we do anything to achieve it. Natural intelligence imbues us with all we need at this exact moment to manifest the highest form of ourselves, and we don’t have to figure out how to get it. We arrived on this planet with this source material already present”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“The work is to crumble the barriers of injustice and shame leveled against us so that we might access what we have always been, because we will, if unobstructed, inevitably grow into the purpose for which we were created: our own unique version of that oak tree.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“Racism, sexism, ableism, homo- and transphobia, ageism, fatphobia are algorithms created by humans’ struggle to make peace with the body. A radical self-love world is a world free from the systems of oppression that make it difficult and sometimes deadly to live in our bodies.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“Saying I’m fat is (and should be) the same as saying my shoes are black, the clouds are fluffy, and Bob Saget is tall. It’s not good, it’s not bad, it just is. The only negativity that this word carries is that which has been socially constructed around it.… We don’t need to stop using the word fat, we need to stop the hatred that our world connects with the word fat.2”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“Natasha, your body is not an apology. It is not something you give to someone to say, ‘Sorry for my disability.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“We humans are masters of distraction, using makeup, weight loss, and a finely curated self-image to avoid being present to our fears, even as they build blockades around our most potent desires.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“Phrases like “Get over it!” and “It’s all in your head” are rooted in ableism. They are body terrorism against non-normative brains. Let’s stop telling people to “get over it” and start asking, “How can I help you heal?”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“A particularly strategic maneuver is to decide that if we don’t understand something it must be wrong. After all, wrong is simpler than not knowing. Wrong means I am not stupid or failing. See all that sneaky, slimy projection happening there? Projection shields us from personal responsibility. It obscures our shame and confusion and places the onus for reconciling it on the body of someone else. We don’t have to work to understand something when it is someone else’s “fault.” We don’t have to undo the shame-based beliefs we were brought up with. We don’t have to question our parents, friends, churches, synagogues, mosques, government, media. We don’t have to challenge or be challenged.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“Too often, self-acceptance is used as a synonym for acquiescence. We accept the things we cannot change.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“We practice self-acceptance when we have grown tired of self-hatred but can’t conceive of anything beyond a paltry tolerance of ourselves.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“Concepts like self-acceptance and body neutrality are not without value. When you have spent your entire life at war with your body, these models offer a truce. But you can have more than a cease-fire. You can have radical self-love because you are already radical self-love.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“As a nine-year-old, I was sorry for everything. "Sonie, you left the refrigerator open!" "Sorry." "Sonya, why is your coat on the couch?" "Sorry." "Sonya, did you get grape jelly on the white pantsuit I paid good money for?" "Sorry, sorry, sorry..." A litany of apologies for my ever clumsy, messy, forgetful self, who spilled evidence of such all over the house. "Sorry" was my way of gathering up the spill.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“A ProPublica analysis of federal data regarding police-involved shootings found that young Black men between ages fifteen and nineteen were twenty-one times more likely to be killed by the police than young White men of the same age.36 By the first half of 2017 the Human Rights Campaign had tracked the rise of over 115 pieces of new anti-LGBT legislation across the United States.37 These numbers tell a story about how our societies fare under the pressures of body-based oppressions.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“Every structure in every society is upheld by the active and passive assistance of other human beings.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“Later, I learned from several transgender friends that the TSA scanners are designed to alert agents to “anomalies” in the groin area. Specifically, agents are instructed to additionally screen all people whose groins appear to differ from their perceived gender. Across the country, large numbers of transgender people are also being forced to navigate similar invasive sexual traumas simply to board a plane. We are told that the procedures of the Transportation Security Administration are supposed to make us safer. I did not feel safe. I was terrified and without recourse. While I stood in the “private screening room” with tears rolling down my face, the least of my concerns was some random person living out a political vendetta against the United States during my flight. I was terrified of having my genitalia touched without my consent by a stranger as a requisite for passage to my next destination. This is body terrorism.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“The argument that people “chose” to be this way or the other is at its core an argument about difference and our inability to understand and make peace with difference. The notion of choice is a convenient scapegoat for our bias and bigotries.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“Our disconnection, trauma, lack of resources, lack of compassion, fear, greed, and ego are the sources of our contributions to human suffering, not our bodies. We can accept humans and their bodies without understanding “why” they love, think, move, or look the way they do. Contrary to common opinion, freeing ourselves from the need to understand everything can bring about a tremendous amount of peace.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“Our ancient ancestors’ battles for resources, food, even mates ensured that humans needed to find ways to identify who was part of their tribe and who was not. This in-group out-group distinction also meant that those outside our group were seen as a threat to our resources. Ultimately we are wired to recognize difference and maybe even distrust it. However, we were also wired to eat bugs and to poop in a hole in the ground. The point being, we are capable of change.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love
“There is gorgeous potential and heinous instinct in us all.”
Sonya Renee Taylor, The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love

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