The Fruitful Darkness Quotes

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The Fruitful Darkness: A Journey Through Buddhist Practice and Tribal Wisdom The Fruitful Darkness: A Journey Through Buddhist Practice and Tribal Wisdom by Joan Halifax
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The Fruitful Darkness Quotes Showing 1-9 of 9
“Being vegetarian here also means that we do not consume dairy and egg products, because they are products of the meat industry. If we stop consuming, they will stop producing. Only collective awakening can create enough determination for action.”
Thich Nhat Hanh, The Fruitful Darkness: A Journey Through Buddhist Practice and Tribal Wisdom
“This stuff of a past not worthily lived is also medicine.”
Joan Halifax, The Fruitful Darkness: A Journey Through Buddhist Practice and Tribal Wisdom
“Some of us are drawn to mountains the way the moon draws the tide. Both the great forests and the mountains live in my bones. They have taught me, humbled me, purified me and changed me.”
Joan Halifax, The Fruitful Darkness: A Journey Through Buddhist Practice and Tribal Wisdom
“Within and around the earth, within and around the hills, within and around the mountains your authority returns to you.”
Joan Halifax, The Fruitful Darkness: A Journey Through Buddhist Practice and Tribal Wisdom
“Speaking in Creations tongues, hearing Creations voices, the boundary of our soul expands. Earth has many voices. Those who understand that Earth is a living being, know this because they have translated themselves to the humble grasses and old trees. They know that Earth is a community that is constantly talking to itself; a communicating universe. And whether we know it or not, we are participating in the web of this community.”
Joan Halifax, The Fruitful Darkness: A Journey Through Buddhist Practice and Tribal Wisdom
“Mountains have long been a geography for pilgrimage, place where people have been humbled and strengthened, they are symbols of the sacred center. Many have traveled to them in order to find the concentrated energy of Earth and to realize the strength of unimpeded space. Viewing a mountain at a distance or walking around its body we can see its shape, know its profile, survey its surrounds. The closer you come to the mountain the more it disappears, the mountain begins to lose its shape as you near it, its body begins to spread out over the landscape losing itself to itself. On climbing the mountain the mountain continues to vanish. It vanishes in the detail of each step, its crown is buried in space, its body is buried in the breath. On reaching the mountain summit we can ask, “What has been attained?” - The top of the mountain? Big view? But the mountain has already disappeared. Going down the mountain we can ask, “What has been attained?” Going down the mountain the closer we are to the mountain the more the mountain disappears, the closer we are to the mountain the more the mountain is realized. Mountain’s realization comes through the details of the breath, mountain appears in each step. Mountain then lives inside our bones, inside our heart-drum. It stands like a huge mother in the atmosphere of our minds. Mountain draws ancestors together in the form of clouds. Heaven, Earth and human meet in the raining of the past. Heaven, Earth and human meet in the winds of the future. Mountain mother is a birth gate that joins the above and below, she is a prayer house, she is a mountain. Mountain is a mountain.”
Joan Halifax, The Fruitful Darkness: A Journey Through Buddhist Practice and Tribal Wisdom
“Mountain’s realization comes through the details of the breath, mountain appears in each step. Mountain then lives inside our bones, inside our heart-drum. It stands like a huge mother in the atmosphere of our minds. Mountain draws ancestors together in the form of clouds. Heaven, Earth and human meet in the raining of the past. Heaven, Earth and human meet in the winds of the future. Mountain mother is a birth gate that joins the above and below, she is a prayer house, she is a mountain. Mountain is a mountain.”
Joan Halifax, The Fruitful Darkness: A Journey Through Buddhist Practice and Tribal Wisdom
“The secret of life,” say the Utes, “is in the shadows and not in the open sun; to see anything at all, you must look deeply into the shadow of a living thing.”
Joan Halifax, The Fruitful Darkness: A Journey Through Buddhist Practice and Tribal Wisdom
“Why climb a mountain? Look! a mountain there. I don’t climb mountain. Mountain climbs me. Mountain is myself. I climb on myself. There is no mountain nor myself. Something moves up and down in the air. Nanao Sakaki”
Joan Halifax, The Fruitful Darkness: A Journey Through Buddhist Practice and Tribal Wisdom