Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race Quotes

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Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge
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Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race Quotes Showing 1-30 of 94
“White privilege is an absence of the consequences of racism. An absence of structural discrimination, an absence of your race being viewed as a problem first and foremost.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“If you are disgusted by what you see, and if you feel the fire coursing through your veins, then it's up to you. You don't have to be the leader of a global movement or a household name. It can be as small scale as chipping away at the warped power relations in your workplace. It can be passing on knowledge and skills to those who wouldn't access them otherwise. It can be creative. It can be informal. It can be your job. It doesn't matter what it is, as long as you're doing something.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“The mess we are living in is a deliberate one. If it was created by people, it can be dismantled by people, and it can be rebuilt in a way that serves all, rather than a selfish, hoarding few.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“Every voice raised against racism chips away at its power. We can't afford to stay silent.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“Discussing racism is not the same thing as discussing 'black identity'. Discussing racism is about discussing white identity. It's about white anxiety. It's about asking why whiteness has this reflexive need to define itself against immigrant bogey monsters in order to feel comfortable, safe and secure. Why am I saying one thing, and white people are hearing something completely different?”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“To be white is to be human; to be white is universal. I only know this because I am not.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“White people are so used to seeing a reflection of themselves in all representations of humanity at all times, that they only notice it when it’s taken away from them.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“If feminism can understand the patriarchy, it's important to question why so many feminists struggle to understand whiteness as a political structure in the very same way.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“When I talk about white privilege, I don’t mean that white people have it easy, that they’ve never struggled, or that they’ve never lived in poverty. But white privilege is the fact that if you’re white, your race will almost certainly positively impact your life’s trajectory in some way. And you probably won’t even notice it.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“Faced with the collective forgetting, we must strive to remember”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“Not seeing race does little to deconstruct racist structures or materially improve the conditions which people of colour are subject to daily. In order to dismantle unjust, racist structures, we must see race. We must see who benefits from their race, who is disproportionately impacted by negative stereotypes about their race, and to who power and privilege is bestowed upon - earned or not - because of their race, their class, and their gender. Seeing race is essential to changing the system.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“It's clear that equality doesn't quite cut it. Asking for a sliver of disproportionate power is too polite a request. I don't want to be included. Instead, I want to question who created the standard in the first place.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“The idea of white privilege forces white people who aren’t actively racist to confront their own complicity in its continuing existence. White privilege is dull, grinding complacency. It is par for the course in a world in which drastic race inequality is responded to with a shoulder shrug, considered just the norm.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“We don’t live in a meritocracy, and to pretend that simple hard work will elevate all to success is an exercise in willful ignorance.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“Demands for equality need to be as complicated as the inequalities they seek to address.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“The insistence is on merit, insinuating that any current majority white leadership in any industry has got there through hard work and no outside help, as if whiteness isn’t its own leg-up, as if it doesn’t imply a familiarity that warms an interviewer to a candidate. When each of the sectors I mentioned earlier have such dire racial representation, you’d have to be fooling yourself if you really think that the homogeneous glut of middle-aged white men currently clogging the upper echelons of most professions got there purely through talent alone. We don’t live in a meritocracy, and to pretend that simple hard work will elevate all to success is an exercise in wilful ignorance.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“White privilege is a manipulative, suffocating blanket of power that envelops everything we know...It's brutal and oppressive, bullying you into not speaking up for fear of losing your loved ones, or job, or flat. It scares you into silencing yourself: you don't get the privilege of speaking honestly about your feelings without extensively assessing the consequences...challenging it can have implications on your quality of life.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“Shallow understanding from people of goodwill is more frustrating than absolute misunderstanding from people of ill will. Lukewarm acceptance is much more bewildering than outright rejection.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“This is the difference between racism and prejudice. There is an unattributed definition of racism that defines it as prejudice plus power. Those disadvantaged by racism can certainly be cruel, vindictive, and prejudiced. Everyone has the capacity to be nasty to other people, to judge them before they get to know them. But there simply aren't enough black people in positions of power to enact racism against white people on the kind of grand scale it currently operates at against black people. Are black people over-represented in the places and spaces where prejudice could really take effect? The answer is almost always no.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“The journey towards understanding structural racism still requires people of colour to prioritise white feelings. Even if they can hear you, they’re not really listening. It’s like something happens to the words as they leave our mouths and reach their ears. The words hit a barrier of denial and they don’t get any further.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“It [feminism] needs to recognise that disabled people aren’t inherently defective, but rather that non-disabled people have failed at creating a physical world that serves all.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“White feminism is a politics that engages itself with myths such as 'I don't see race'. It is a politics which insists that talking about race fuels racism - thereby denying people of colour the words to articulate our existence. It's a politics that expects people of colour to quietly assimilate into institutionally racist structures without kicking up a fuss. It's a politics where people of colour are never setting the agenda. Instead, they are relegated to constantly reacting to things and frantically playing catch-up. A white-dominated feminist political consensus allows people of colour a place a the table if we're willing to settle for tokenism, but it clamps down if they attempt to create accountability for said consensus - let alone any structural change.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“We tell ourselves that racism is about moral values, when instead it is about the survival strategy of systemic power.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“Worse still is the white person who might be willing to entertain the possibility of said racism, but who thinks we enter this conversation as equals. We don't.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“Feminism is not about equality, and certainly not about silently slipping into a world of work created by and for men. Feminism, at its best, is a movement that works to liberate all people who have been economically, socially and culturally marginalized by an ideological system that has been deigned for them to fail.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“The journey towards understanding structural racism still requires people of colour to prioritise white feelings.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“Thinking about power made me realize that racism was about so much more than personal prejudice. It was about being in the position to negatively affect other people's life chances.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“When I talk about white privilege, I don't mean that white people have it easy, that they've never struggled, or that they've never lived in poverty. But white privilege is the fact that if you're white, your race will almost certainly positively impact your life's trajectory in some way. And you probably won't even notice it.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“I don't want to be included. Instead, I want to question who created the standard in the first place. After a lifetime of embodying difference, I have no desire to be equal. I want to deconstruct the structural power of a system that marked me out as different. I don't wish to be assimilated into the status quo. I want to be liberated from all the negative assumptions that my characteristics bring. The same onus is not on me to change. Instead it's the world around me..”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race
“It seems there is a belief among some white people that being accused of racism is far worse than actual racism.”
Reni Eddo-Lodge, Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race

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