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Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism 1981-1991 Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism 1981-1991 by Salman Rushdie
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Imaginary Homelands Quotes Showing 1-8 of 8
“Go for broke. Always try and do too much. Dispense with safety nets. Take a deep breath before you begin talking. Aim for the stars. Keep grinning. Be bloody-minded. Argue with the world. And never forget that writing is as close as we get to keeping a hold on the thousand and one things--childhood, certainties, cities, doubts, dreams, instants, phrases, parents, loves--that go on slipping , like sand, through our fingers.”
Salman Rushdie, Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism 1981-1991
“The word 'translation' comes, etymologically, from the Latin for 'bearing across'. Having been borne across the world, we are translated men. It is normally supposed that something always gets lost in translation; I cling, obstinately to the notion that something can also be gained.”
Salman Rushdie, Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism 1981-1991
“Meaning is a shaky edifice we build out of scraps, dogmas, childhood injuries, newspaper articles, chance remarks, old fillms, small victories, people hated, people loved; perhaps it is because our sense of what is the case is constructed from such inadequate materials that we defend it so fiercely, even to death.”
Salman Rushdie, Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism 1981-1991
“It may be argued that the past is a country from which we have all emigrated, that its loss is part of our common humanity.”
Salman Rushdie, Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism 1981-1991
tags: home, past
“Sometimes we feel we straddle two cultures; at other times, that we fall between two stools.”
Salman Rushdie, Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism 1981-1991
“But human beings do not perceive things whole; we are not gods but wounded creatures, cracked lenses, capable only of fractured perceptions. Partial beings, in all the senses of that phrase. Meaning is a shaky edifice we build out of scraps, dogmas, childhood injuries, newspaper articles, chance remarks, old films, small victories, people hated, people loved; perhaps it is because our sense of what is the case is constructed from such inadequate materials that we defend it so fiercely, even to the death.”
Salman Rushdie, Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism 1981-1991
“human beings do not perceive things whole; we are not gods but wounded creatures, cracked lenses, capable only of fractured perceptions”
Salman Rushdie, Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism 1981-1991
“And so it's interesting to remember that when Mahatma Gandhi, the father of an earlier freedom movement, came to England and was asked what he thought of English civilization, he replied: 'I think it would be a good idea.”
Salman Rushdie, Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism 1981-1991