Around the Day in Eighty Worlds Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
Around the Day in Eighty Worlds Around the Day in Eighty Worlds by Julio Cortázar
622 ratings, 4.09 average rating, 42 reviews
Around the Day in Eighty Worlds Quotes Showing 1-30 of 32
“In quoting others, we cite ourselves.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“I sometimes longed for someone who, like me, had not adjusted perfectly with his age, and such a person was hard to find; but I soon discovered cats, in which I could imagine a condition like mine, and books, where I found it quite often.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“Memory is a mirror that scandalously lies.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“All profound distraction opens certain doors. You have to allow yourself to be distracted when you are unable to concentrate.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“An admirable line of Pablo Neruda’s, “My creatures are born of a long denial,” seems to me the best definition of writing as a kind of exorcism, casting off invading creatures by projecting them into universal existence, keeping them on the other side of the bridge… It may be exaggerating to say that all completely successful short stories, especially fantastic stories, are products of neurosis, nightmares or hallucination neutralized through objectification and translated to a medium outside the neurotic terrain. This polarization can be found in any memorable short story, as if the author, wanting to rid himself of his creature as soon and as absolutely as possible, exorcises it the only way he can: by writing it.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“Wordplay hides a key to reality that the dictionary tries in vain to lock inside every free word.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“We know that attention acts as a lightning rod. Merely by concentrating on something one causes endless analogies to collect around it, even penetrate the boundaries of the subject itself: an experience that we call coincidence, serendipity – the terminology is extensive. My experience has been that in these circular travels what is really significant surrounds a central absence, an absence that, paradoxically, is the text being written or to be written.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“We no longer believe because it is absurd: it is absurd because we must believe.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“Memory weaves and traps us at the same time according to a scheme in which we do not participate: we should never speak of our memory, for it is anything but ours; it works on its own terms, it assists us while deceiving us or perhaps deceives up to assist us.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“(memory is) A strange echo, which stores its replicas according to some other acoustic than consciousness or expectation.

Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“Skill alone cannot teach or produce a great short story, which condenses the obsession of the creature; it is a hallucinatory presence manifest from the first sentence to fascinate the reader, to make him lose contact with the dull reality that surrounds him, submerging him in another that is more intense and compelling.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“Now that I think about it, it seems to me that’s what Idiocy is: the ability to be enthusiastic all the time about anything you like, so that a drawing on the wall does not have to be diminished by the memory of the frescoes of Giotto in Padua.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“I think it is vanity to want to put into a story anything but the story itself.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“All European writers are ‘slaves of their baptism,’ if I may paraphrase Rimbaud; like it or not, their writing carries baggage from an immense and almost frightening tradition; they accept that tradition or they fight against it, it inhabits them, it is their familiar and their succubus. Why write, if everything has, in a way, already been said? Gide observed sardonically that since nobody listened, everything has to be said again, yet a suspicion of guilt and superfluity leads the European intellectual to the most extreme refinements of his trade and tools, the only way to avoid paths too much traveled. Thus the enthusiasm that greets novelties, the uproar when a writer has succeeded in giving substance to a new slice of the invisible; merely recall symbolism, surrealism, the ‘nouveau roman’: finally something truly new that neither Ronsard, nor Stendahl , nor Proust imagined. For a moment we can put aside our guilt; even the epigones begin too believe they are doing something new. Afterwards, slowly, they begin to feel European again and each writer still has his albatross around his neck.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“The mysterious does not spell itself out in capital letters, as many writers believe, but is always between, an interstice.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“For me the thing that signals a great story is what we might call its autonomy, the fact that it detaches itself from its author like a soap bubble blown from a clay pipe.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“The best literature is always a take [in the musical sense]; there is an implicit risk in its execution, a margin of danger that is the pleasure of the flight, of the love, carrying with it a tangible loss but also a total engagement that, on another level, lends the theater its unparalleled imperfection faced with the perfection of film.

I don’t want to write anything but takes.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“The more a book is like an opium pipe, the more the Chinaman reader is satisfied with it and tends to discuss the quality of the drug rather than its lethargic effects.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“In the twentieth century nothing can better cure the anthropocentrism that is the author of all our ills than to cast ourselves into the physics of the infinitely large (or the infinitely small). By reading any text of popular science we quickly regain the sense of the absurd, but this time it is a sentiment that can be held in our hands, born of tangible, demonstrable, almost consoling things. We no longer believe because it is absurd: it is absurd because we must believe.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“Nothing is more comical than seriousness understood as a virtue that has to precede all important literature”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“The fantastic breaks the crust of appearance … something grabs us by the shoulders to throw us outside ourselves. I have always known that the big surprises await us where we have learned to be surprised by nothing, that is, where we are not shocked by ruptures in the order.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“Thirsty for being, the poet ceaselessly reaches out to reality, seeking with the indefatigable harpoon of the poem a reality that is always better hidden, more re(g)al. The poem’s power is as an instrument of possession but at the same time, ineffably, it expresses the desire for possession, like a net that fishes by itself, a hook that is also the desire of the fish. To be a poet is to desire and, at the same time, to obtain, in the exact shape of the desire.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“The archive of supposed photocopies (I.E. memory) actually offers up strange creatures; the green paradise of childhood loves that Baudelaire recalled is for many a future in reverse, an obverse of hope in the face of the gray purgatory of adult loves.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“I am talking about the responsibility of the poet, who is irresponsible by definition, an anarchist enamored of a solar order and never of the new order or whatever slogan makes five or six hundred million men march in step in a parody of order.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“The modern story begun, one might say, with Edgar Allan Poe, which proceeds inexorably, like a machine destined to accomplish its mission with the maximum economy of means.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
tags: poe, story
“Anyone who finds himself incapable of grasping the complexities of a work hides his withdrawal behind the most superficial pretext because he has not gotten past the surface.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“All established order forms a line of resistance against the threat of rupture and places its meager forces at the service of continuity. That everything should continue as usual is the bourgeois standard of a reality that is indeed bourgeois precisely because it is a standard.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“In the twentieth century nothing can better cure the anthropocentrism that is the author of all our ills than to cast ourselves into the physics of the infinitely large (or the infinitely small).”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“De ce naiba se interpune între viață și literatură un soi de zid al rușinii? În momentul în care începe să lucreze la o povestire sau la un roman, scriitorul tipic își pune guler scrobit și se urcă pe dulap. (...) Neghiobii aceștia cred că seriozitatea trebuie să fie solemnă sau să nu mai fie deloc; de parcă Cervantes a fost solemn.”
Julio Cortázar, Around the Day in Eighty Worlds
“Citar es citarse.”
Julio Cortázar, La vuelta al día en ochenta mundos

« previous 1