コンビニ人間 [Konbini ningen] Quotes

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コンビニ人間 [Konbini ningen] コンビニ人間 [Konbini ningen] by Sayaka Murata
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コンビニ人間 [Konbini ningen] Quotes Showing 1-30 of 56
“This society hasn't changed one bit. People who don't fit into the village are expelled: men who don't hunt, women who don't give birth to children. For all we talk about modern society and individualism, anyone who doesn't try to fit in can expect to be meddled with, coerced, and ultimately banished from the village.”
Sayaka Murata, コンビニ人間 [Konbini ningen]
“The normal world has no room for exceptions and always quietly eliminates foreign objects. Anyone who is lacking is disposed of. So that’s why I need to be cured. Unless I’m cured, normal people will expurgate me.”
Sayaka Murata, Convenience Store Woman
“When something was strange, everyone thought they had the right to come stomping in all over your life to figure out why. I found that arrogant and infuriating, not to mention a pain in the neck. Sometimes I even wanted to hit them with a shovel to shut them up, like I did that time in elementary school. But I recalled how upset my sister had been when I’d casually mentioned this to her before and kept my mouth shut.”
Sayaka Murata, Convenience Store Woman
“She's far happier thinking her sister is normal, even if she has a lot of problems, than she is having an abnormal sister for whom everything is fine.”
Sayaka Murata, コンビニ人間 [Konbini ningen]
“You eliminate the parts of your life that others find strange--maybe that's what everyone means when they say they want to 'cure" me.”
Sayaka Murata, コンビニ人間 [Konbini ningen]
“So the manual for life already existed. It was just that it was already ingrained in everyone’s heads, and there wasn’t any need to put it in writing. The specific form of what is considered an “ordinary person” had been there all along, unchanged since prehistoric times I finally realized.”
Sayaka Murata, Convenience Store Woman
“When something was strange, everyone thought they had the right to come stomping in all over your life to figure out why.”
Sayaka Murata, Convenience Store Woman
“I find the shape of people’s eyes particularly interesting when they’re being condescending. I see a wariness or a fear of being contradicted or sometimes a belligerent spark ready to jump on any attack.”
Sayaka Murata, Convenience Store Woman
“After all, I absorb the world around me, and that’s changing all the time. Just as all the water that was in my body last time we met has now been replaced with new water, the things that make up me have changed too.”
Sayaka Murata, Convenience Store Woman
“My present self is formed almost completely of the people around me. I am currently made up of 30 percent Mrs. Izumi, 30 percent Sugawara, 20 percent the manager, and the rest absorbed from past colleagues such as Sasaki, who left six months ago, and Okasaki, who was our supervisor until a year ago. My speech is especially infected by everyone around me and is currently a mix of that of Mrs. Izumi and Sugawara. I think the same goes for most people. When some of Sugawara’s band members came into the store recently they all dressed and spoke just like her. After Mrs. Izumi came, Sasaki started sounding just like her when she said, “Good job, see you tomorrow!” Once a woman who had gotten on well with Mrs. Izumi at her previous store came to help out, and she dressed so much like Mrs. Izumi I almost mistook the two. And I probably infect others with the way I speak too. Infecting each other like this is how we maintain ourselves as human is what I think.”
Sayaka Murata, Convenience Store Woman
“The normal world has no room for exceptions and always quietly eliminates foreign objects. Anyone who is lacking is disposed of.”
Sayaka Murata, Convenience Store Woman
“The long-forgotten silence sounded like music I’d never heard before.”
Sayaka Murata, Convenience Store Woman
“Infecting each other like this is how we maintain ourselves as human is what I think.”
Sayaka Murata, Convenience Store Woman
“I wished I was back in the convenience store where I was valued as a working member of staff and things weren’t as complicated as this. Once we donned our uniforms, we were all equals regardless of gender, age, or nationality— all simply store workers.”
Sayaka Murata, コンビニ人間 [Konbini ningen]
“When I can’t sleep, I think about the transparent glass box that is still stirring with life even in the darkness of night. That pristine aquarium is still operating like clockwork. As I visualize the scene, the sounds of the store reverberate in my eardrums and lull me to sleep.”
Sayaka Murata, Convenience Store Woman
“Up until now he’d been ranting about people meddling in his life, yet here he was attacking me with the same kinds of reproaches that were making him suffer. His argument was falling apart I thought. Maybe people who thought they were being violated felt a bit better when they attacked other people in the same way.”
Sayaka Murata, Convenience Store Woman
“I’d noticed soon after starting the job that whenever I got angry at the same things as everyone else, they all seemed happy. If I went along with the manager when he was annoyed or joined in the general irritation at someone skiving off the night shift, there was a strange sense of solidarity as everyone seemed pleased that I was angry too.”
Sayaka Murata, Convenience Store Woman
“The sensation that the world is slowly dying feels good.”
Sayaka Murata, Convenience Store Woman
“When you work in a convenience store, people often look down on you for working there. I find this fascinating, and I like to look them in the face when they do this to me. And as i do so I always think: that's what a human is.”
Sayaka Murata, コンビニ人間 [Konbini ningen]
“People who are considered normal enjoy putting those who aren't on trial, you know.”
Sayaka Murata, コンビニ人間 [Konbini ningen]
“A convenience store is a forcibly normalized environment where foreign matter is immediately eliminated. The threatening atmosphere that had briefly permeated the store was swept away, and the customers again concentrated on buying their coffee and pastries as if nothing had happened.”
Sayaka Murata, Convenience Store Woman
“For breakfast I eat convenience store bread, for lunch I eat convenience store rice balls with something from the hot-food cabinet, and after work I’m often so tired I just buy something from the store and take it home for dinner. I drink about half the bottle of water while I’m at work, then put it in my ecobag and take it home with me to finish at night. When I think that my body is entirely made up of food from this store, I feel like I’m as much a part of the store as the magazine racks or the coffee machine.”
Sayaka Murata, Convenience Store Woman
“So that was it: now that she thinks he’s “one of us” she can lecture him. She’s far happier thinking her sister is normal, even if she has a lot of problems, than she is having an abnormal sister for whom everything is fine. For her, normality—however messy—is far more comprehensible.”
Sayaka Murata, Convenience Store Woman
“When something was strange, everyone thought they had the right to come stomping in all over your life to figure out why. I found that arrogant and infuriating, not to mention a pain in the neck. Sometimes I even wanted to hit them with a shovel to shut them up, like I did that time in elementary school.”
Sayaka Murata, Convenience Store Woman
“I am one of those cogs, going round and round. I have become a functioning part of the world, rotating in the time of day called morning.”
Sayaka Murata, Convenience Store Woman
“I find the shape of people's eyes particularly interesting when they're being condescending. I see a wariness or a fear of being contradicted or sometimes a belligerent spark ready to jump on any attack. And if they're unaware of being condescending, their glazed-over eyeballs are steeped in a fluid mix of ecstasy and a sense of superiority.”
Sayaka Murata, コンビニ人間 [Konbini ningen]
“And so I realized. This society hasn’t changed one bit. People who don’t fit into the village are expelled: men who don’t hunt, women who don’t give birth to children. For all we talk about modern society and individualism, anyone who doesn’t try to fit in can expect to be meddled with, coerced, and ultimately banished from the village.”
Sayaka Murata, Convenience Store Woman
“Deep down I wanted some kind of change. Any change, whether good or bad, would be better than the state of impasse I was in now.”
Sayaka Murata, Convenience Store Woman
“Look, I know it's none of my business, but you should really either get a job or get married, one or the other. I mean, seriously. Or better still, you should do both. Otherwise you're going to end up starving to death sometime, you know. You're really living on the edge. (138)”
Sayaka Murata, コンビニ人間 [Konbini ningen]
“I no longer knew what standard to live by. Until now, my body had belonged to the convenience store, even when I wasn’t working. Sleeping, keeping in good physical shape, and eating nutritiously were all part of my job. I had to stay healthy for work.”
Sayaka Murata, Convenience Store Woman

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