The Choice Quotes

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The Choice: Embrace the Possible The Choice: Embrace the Possible by Edith Eger
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The Choice Quotes Showing 1-30 of 386
“Our painful experiences aren’t a liability—they’re a gift. They give us perspective and meaning, an opportunity to find our unique purpose and our strength.”
Edith Eger, The Choice: Embrace the Possible
“We don’t know where we’re going, we don’t know what’s going to happen, but no one can take away from you what you put in your own mind.”
Edith Eger, The Choice: Embrace the Possible
“Time doesn't heal. It’s what you do with the time. Healing is possible when we choose to take responsibility, when we choose to take risks, and finally, when we choose to release the wound, to let go of the past or the grief.”
Edith Eger, The Choice: Embrace the Possible
“To be passive is to let others decide for you. To be aggressive is to decide for others. To be assertive is to decide for yourself. And to trust that there is enough, that you are enough.”
Edith Eva Eger, The Choice: Embrace the Possible
“To forgive is to grieve—for what happened, for what didn’t happen—and to give up the need for a different past.”
Edith Eger, The Choice
“Perfectionism is the belief that something is broken - you. So you dress up your brokenness with degrees, achievements, accolades, pieces of paper, none of which can fix what you think you are fixing.”
Edith Eger, The Choice: Embrace the Possible
“Just remember,” she says, “no one can take away from you what you’ve put in your mind.”
Edith Eger, The Choice: Embrace the Possible
“...By the time I would finish school I'll be fifty? He smiled.
"You're going to be fifty anyhow”
Edith Eva Eger, The Choice: Embrace the Possible
“The only place where we can exercise our freedom of choice is in the present.”
Edith Eger, The Choice
“Here you are! In the sacred present. I can’t heal you—or anyone—but I can celebrate your choice to dismantle the prison in your mind, brick by brick. You can’t change what happened, you can’t change what you did or what was done to you. But you can choose how you live now. My precious, you can choose to be free.”
Edith Eger, The Choice
“It’s the first time I see that we have a choice: to pay attention to what we’ve lost or to pay attention to what we still have.”
Edith Eger, The Choice
“When we seek revenge, even non-violent revenge, we are revolving, not evolving.”
Edith Eger, The Choice
“Answer the most important questions at the start of any journey towards freedom:
What am I doing now?
Is it working?
Is it bringing me closer to my goals, or farther away?”
Edith Eva Eger, The Choice: Embrace the Possible
“There is no hierarchy of suffering. There's nothing that makes my pain worse or better than yours.”
Edith Eger, The Choice: Embrace the Possible
“Change is about noticing what’s no longer working and stepping out of the familiar, imprisoning patterns.”
Edith Eger, The Choice
“You can live to avenge the past, or you can live to enrich the present.”
Edith Eger, The Choice: Embrace the Possible
“How easily a life can become a litany of guilt and regret, a song that keeps echoing with the same chorus, with the inability to forgive ourselves. How easily the life we didn’t live becomes the only life we prize. How easily we are seduced by the fantasy that we are in control, that we were ever in control, that the things we could or should have doneor said have the power, if only we had done or said them, to cure pain, to erase suffering, to vanish loss. How easily we can cling to – worship – the choice we think we could or should have made.”
Edith Eva Eger, The Choice: Embrace the Possible
“We cannot choose to have a life free of hurt. But we can choose to be free, to escape the past, no matter what befalls us, and to embrace the possible.”
Edith Eger, The Choice: Embrace the Possible
“Survivors don't have time to ask, "Why me?" For survivors, the only relevant question is, "What now?”
Edith Eger, The Choice: Embrace the Possible
“A good definition of being a victim is when you keep the focus outside yourself, when you look outside yourself for someone to blame for your present circumstances, or to determine your purpose, fate, or worth.”
Edith Eger, The Choice: Embrace the Possible
“the willingness to take absolute responsibility for your life; the willingness to risk; the willingness to release yourself from judgment and reclaim your innocence, accepting and loving yourself for who you really are—human, imperfect, and whole.”
Edith Eger, The Choice
“When we abdicate taking responsibility for ourselves, we are giving up our ability to create and discover meaning. In other words, we give up on life.”
Edith Eger, The Choice: Embrace the Possible
“In my first weeks at Auschwitz I learn the rules of survival. If you can steal a piece of bread from the guards, you are a hero, but if you steal from an inmate, you are disgraced, you die; competition and domination get you nowhere, cooperation is the name of the game; to survive is to transcend your own needs and commit yourself to someone or something outside yourself.”
Edith Eger, The Choice: Embrace the Possible
“...(S)uffering is universal. But victimhood is optional. There is a difference between victimization and victimhood. We are all likely to victimized in some way in the course of our lives. At some point we will suffer some kind of affliction or calamity or abuse, caused by circumstances or people or institutions over which we have little or no control. This is life. And this is victimization. It comes from outside. It's the neighborhood bully, the boss who rages, the spouse who hits, the lover who cheats, the discriminatory law, the accident that lands you in the hospital.

In contrast, victimhood comes from the inside. No one can make you a victim but you. We become victims not because of what happens to us but when we choose to hold on to our victimization. We develop a victim's mind -- a way of thinking and being that is rigid, blaming, pessimistic, stuck in the past, unforgiving, punitive, and without healthy limits or boundaries. We become our own jailors when we choose the confines of the victim's mind.”
Edith Eger, The Choice: Embrace the Possible
“and understand that when we anesthetize our feelings, with eating or alcohol or other compulsive behaviors, we just prolong our suffering.”
Edith Eger, The Choice: Embrace the Possible
“The hardest person to forgive is someone I’ve still to confront: myself.”
Edith Eger, The Choice
“But over time I learned that I can choose how to respond to the past. I can be miserable, or I can be hopeful—I can be depressed, or I can be happy. We always have that choice, that opportunity for control. I’m here, this is now, I have learned to tell myself, over and over, until the panicky feeling begins to ease.”
Edith Eger, The Choice: Embrace the Possible
“Taking risks doesn’t mean throwing ourselves blindly into danger. But it means embracing our fears so that we aren’t imprisoned by them.”
Edith Eger, The Choice
“We can’t choose to vanish the dark, but we can choose to kindle the light.”
Edith Eger, The Choice
“What are you going to do about it? I believe in the power of positive thinking—but change and freedom also require positive action. Anything we practice, we become better at.”
Edith Eger, The Choice

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