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Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World by Robert D. Kaplan
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Earning the Rockies Quotes Showing 1-19 of 19
“Geography does not determine individual character, but it does matter.”
Robert D. Kaplan, Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World
“So far we have seen the weakening and collapse of small and medium-sized states in Africa and the Middle East. But quasi-anarchy in larger states like Russia and China, on which the territorial organization of Eurasia hinges, could be next - tied to structural economic causes linked, in turn, to slow growth world-wide.”
Robert D. Kaplan, Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World
“America is fated to lead. That is the judgment of geography as it has played out over the past two and a half centuries.”
Robert D. Kaplan, Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World
“While our land forces are for unpredictable contingencies, our sea and air forces secure the global commons. The navy is our away team: its operations tempo around the world is the same, whether in peacetime or wartime. So crucial is our navy that were just one of America’s eleven aircraft carriers sunk or disabled by an enemy combatant, it would constitute a national disaster in strategic and reputational terms as devastating as 9/11. Manifest Destiny, the conquest of a continent with its unleashing of vast economic wealth and national will, reaches a point of concision here at Naval Base San Diego. It is a fitting end to my journey.”
Robert D. Kaplan, Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World
“The middle class for a long time now has been slowly dissolving into a working class precariously on the verge of slipping into outright poverty, and also in the other direction into a smaller, upper-middle, global elite.”
Robert D. Kaplan, Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World
“What destroyed the Indian was not primarily political greed, land hunger, or military power, not the white man’s germs or the white man’s rum. What destroyed him was the manufactured products of a culture, iron and steel, guns, needles, woolen cloth, things that once possessed could not be done without.”19”
Robert D. Kaplan, Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World
“Even in the heart of America, if a small city is not connected in some demonstrable fashion to other continents, it is dead.”
Robert D. Kaplan, Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World
“Grand strategy is about marrying ends to means, about doing what you can, consistent with the nation's capabilities and resources.”
Robert D. Kaplan, Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World
“Leave us alone and we’ll leave you alone, or else we will hunt you down wherever you are.”
Robert D. Kaplan, Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World
“another case of America becoming a network of massive city-states more intimately interconnected with other continents than with their own hinterlands”
Robert D. Kaplan, Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World
“Lincoln had risen to this pinnacle through migration, self-education, and hard work.”
Robert D. Kaplan, Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World
“Indeed, Chicago seems to have literally sucked the air out of Springfield: another case of American becoming a network of massive city-states more intimately interconnected with other continents than with their own hinterlands. It is in the merging with the rest of the world and global civilization that the forces of division come to the fore at home. Springfield: another small city that should inspire but doesn't.”
Robert D. Kaplan, Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World
“Europe's era of internal cohesion may already be past.”
Robert D. Kaplan, Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World
tags: europe
“The American narrative is morally unresolvable because the society that saved humanity in the great conflicts of the twentieth century was also a society built on enormous crimes—slavery and the extinction of the native inhabitants.”
Robert D. Kaplan, Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World
“This is an older history being taught here, not the one often taught in schools and universities now, in which the story of the West is reduced to atrocity and little more. It is true that historical research is necessary to defeat jingoistic nationalism. The more history we know, the more complex the story of our past becomes and the more realistic we can be about it. But without some kind of usable past, there is no possibility of affecting geopolitics for the good. How do we know where to go if we can’t draw upon some inspiration from the past? There is too much destruction coming out of the academy, not enough inspiration. We require a proper balance.”
Robert D. Kaplan, Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World
“One marker, which I would read a bit later on, tells the familiar story of Narcissa Whitman, "trail-blazer and martyred missionary," who followed the north side of the Platte in 1836 on horseback, "becoming the first white women to cross the American continent," and who, along with her husband, Marcus, was "massacred by Cayuse Indians" at their Protestant mission in 1847 in Walla Walla, Washington. (The Indians there were justifiably enraged at the whites for spreading measles to them.)”
Robert D. Kaplan, Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World
“Being on the frontier, as I've said, required doing rather than imagining: clearing land, building shelter, obtaining food supplies. Frontiers test ideologies like nothing else. There is no time for the theoretical. That, ultimately, is why America has not been friendly to communism, fascism, or other, more benign forms of utopianism. Idealized concepts have rarely taken firm root in America, and so intellectuals have had to look to Europe for inspiration. People here are too busy making money - an extension, of course, of the frontier ethos, with its emphasis on practical initiative.”
Robert D. Kaplan, Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World
“This is to be a landscape meditation about America’s place in the world.”
Robert D. Kaplan, Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World
“No, this architecture in Council Bluffs and Omaha, this whole deeply embedded psychology of the use of space, simply conveys that there is a lot of it. There is no need to make things smaller. That is the American condition, a source of its optimism and its unfriendliness to elites and aristocracies of all kinds, which requires constraints on space in order to increase the value of their land - which then affords them their social position. This was a crucial difference between the Old World and the New. Virtually unlimited space is the essence of the frontier mentality.”
Robert D. Kaplan, Earning the Rockies: How Geography Shapes America's Role in the World