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Un conto ancora aperto Un conto ancora aperto by Ta-Nehisi Coates
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Un conto ancora aperto Quotes Showing 1-12 of 12
“Won't reparations divide us? Not any more than we are already divided. The wealth gap merely puts a number on something we feel but cannot say - that American propserity was ill-gotten and selective in its distribution. What is needed is an airing of family secrets, a settling with old ghosts. What is needed is a healing of the American psyche and the banishment of white guilt.”
Ta-Nehisi Coates, Un conto ancora aperto
“To celebrate freedom and democracy while forgetting American's origins in a slavery economy is patriotism à la carte.”
Ta-Nehisi Coates, Un conto ancora aperto
“In 2001, the Associated Press published a three-part investigation into the theft of black-owned land stretching back to the antebellum period. The series documented some 406 victims and 24,000 acres of land values at tends of millions of dollars. The land was taken through means ranging from legal chicanery to terrorism.”
Ta-Nehisi Coates, Un conto ancora aperto
“When President Roosevelt signed Social Security into law in 1935, 65 percent of African Americans nationally and between 70 and 80 percent in the South were ineligible.”
Ta-Nehisi Coates, Un conto ancora aperto
“America's indispensable working class existed as property beyond the realm of politics, leaving white Americans free to trumpet their love of freedom and democratic values.”
Ta-Nehisi Coates, Un conto ancora aperto
“The popular mocking of reparations as a harebrained scheme authored by wild-eyed lefties and intellectually unserious black nationalists is fear masquerading as laughter.”
Ta-Nehisi Coates, Un conto ancora aperto
“Here we find the roots of American wealth and democracy—in the for-profit destruction of the most important asset available to any people, the family. The destruction was not incidental to America’s rise; it facilitated that rise. By erecting a slave society, America created the economic foundation for its great experiment in democracy.”
Ta-Nehisi Coates, Un conto ancora aperto
“In the 1920s, Jim Crow Mississippi was, in all facets of society, a kleptocracy.”
Ta-Nehisi Coates, Un conto ancora aperto
“The American real-estate industry believed segregation to be a moral principle. As late as 1950, the National Association of Real Estate Boards' code of ethics warned that "a Realtor should never be instrumental in introducing into a neighborhood ... any race or nationality, or any individuals whose presence will clearly be detrimental to property values." A 1943 brochure specified that such potential undesireables might include madams, bootleggers, gangsters - and "a colored man of means who was giving his children a college education and thought they were entitled to live among whites."

The federal government concurred. It was the How Owners' Loan Corporation, not a private trade association, that pioneered the practice of redlining, selectively granting loans and insisting that any property it insured be covered by a restrictive covenant - a clause in the deed forbidding the sale of the property to anyone other than whites. Millions of dollars flowed from tax coffers into segregated white neighborhoods.

"For perhaps the first time, the federal government embraced the discriminatory attitudes of the marketplace," the historian Kenneth R. Jackson wrote in his 1985 book, Crabgrass Frontier, a history of suburbanization. "Previously, prejudices were personalized and individualized; FHA exhorted segregation and enshrined it as public policy. Whole areas of cities were declared ineligible for loan guarantees." Redlining was not officially outlawed until 1968, by the Fair Housing Act. By then the damage was done - and reports of redlining by banks have continued.”
Ta-Nehisi Coates, Un conto ancora aperto
“In Chicago and across the country, whites looking to achieve the American dream could rely on a legitimate credit system backed by the government. Blacks were herded into the sights of unscrupulous lenders who took them for money and for sport.”
Ta-Nehisi Coates, Un conto ancora aperto
“Kids in North Lawndale need not be confused about their prospects: Cook County's Juvenile Temporary Detention Center sits directly adjacent to the neighborhood.”
Ta-Nehisi Coates, Un conto ancora aperto
“Between 1882 and 1968, more black people were lynched in MIssissippi than in any other state.”
Ta-Nehisi Coates, Un conto ancora aperto