Pachinko Quotes

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Pachinko Pachinko by Min Jin Lee
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Pachinko Quotes Showing 1-30 of 200
“Living everyday in the presence of those who refuse to acknowledge your humanity takes great courage”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“You want to see a very bad man? Make an ordinary man successful beyond his imagination. Let’s see how good he is when he can do whatever he wants.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“Learn everything. Fill your mind with knowledge—it’s the only kind of power no one can take away from you.” Hansu never told him to study, but rather to learn, and it occurred to Noa that there was a marked difference. Learning was like playing, not labor.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“History has failed us, but no matter.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“There was consolation: The people you loved, they were always there with you, she had learned. Sometimes, she could be in front of a train kiosk or the window of a bookstore, and she could feel Noa's small hand when he was a boy, and she would close her eyes and think of his sweet grassy smell and remember that he had always tried his best. At those moments, it was good to be alone to hold on to him.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“...a God that did everything we thought was right and good wouldn't be the creator of the universe. He would be our puppet.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“No one is clean. Living makes you dirty.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“There's nothing fucking worse than knowing that you're just like everybody else.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“a man must learn to forgive—to know what is important, that to live without forgiveness was a kind of death with breathing and movement.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“Sunja-ya, a woman’s life is endless work and suffering. There is suffering and then more suffering. It’s better to expect it, you know. You’re becoming a woman now, so you should be told this. For a woman, the man you marry will determine the quality of your life completely. A good man is a decent life, and a bad man is a cursed life—but no matter what, always expect suffering, and just keep working hard. No one will take care of a poor woman—just ourselves.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“because she would not believe that she was no different than her parents, that seeing him as only Korean—good or bad—was the same as seeing him only as a bad Korean. She could not see his humanity, and Noa realized that this was what he wanted most of all: to be seen as human.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“We cannot help but be interested in the stories of people that history pushes aside so thoughtlessly.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“You are very brave, Noa. Much, much braver than me. Living every day in the presence of those who refuse to acknowledge your humanity takes great courage.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“Noa had been a sensitive child who had believed that if he followed all the rules and was the best, then somehow, the hostile world would change its mind. His death may have been her fault for having allowed him to believe such cruel ideals”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“There was more to being something than just blood.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“But ideas can make men forget their own interests. And the guys in charge will exploit men who believe in ideas too much.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“People are awful. Drink some beer.” Haruki”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“Yes, of course. If you love anyone, you cannot help but share his suffering. If we love our Lord, not just admire him or fear him or want things from him, we must recognize his feelings; he must be in anguish over our sins. We must understand this anguish. The Lord suffers with us. He suffers like us. It is a consolation to know this. To know that we are not in fact alone in our suffering.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“Patriotism is just an idea, so is capitalism or communism. But ideas can make men forget their own interests. And the guys in charge will exploit men who believe in ideas too much.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“His Presbyterian minster father had believed in a divine design, and Mozasu believed that life was like this game where the player could adjust the dials yet also expect the uncertainty of factors he couldn't control. He understood why his customers wanted to play something that looked fixed but which also left room for randomness and hope.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“In Seoul, people like me get called Japanese bastards, and in Japan, I'm just another dirty Korean no matter how much money I make or how nice I am. So what the fuck?”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“Noa stared at her. She would always believe that he was someone else, that he wasn't himself but some fanciful idea of a foreign person; she would always feel like she was someone special because she had condescended to be with someone everyone else hated. His presence would prove to the world that she was a good person, an educated person, a liberal person. Noa didn't care about being Korean when he was with her; in fact, he didn't care about being Korean or Japanese with anyone. He wanted to be just himself, whatever that meant; he wanted to forget himself sometimes. But that wasn't possible. It would never be possible with her.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“Etsuko had to go back to the restaurant, but she settled on the sofa for a few minutes. When she had been a young mother there used to be only one time in her waking hours where she’d felt a kind of peace, and that was always after her children went to bed for the night. She longed to see her sons as they were back then: their legs chubby and white, their mushroom haircuts misshapen because they could never sit still at the barber. She wished she could take back the times she had scolded her children just because she was tired. There were so many errors. If life allowed revisions, she would let them stay in their bath a little longer, read them one more story before bed, and fix them another plate of shrimp.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“People are rotten everywhere you go. They’re no good. You want to see a very bad man? Make an ordinary man successful beyond his imagination. Let’s see how good he is when he can do whatever he wants.” Sunja”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“Even if there were hundred bad Japanese, if there was one good one, he refused to make a blanket statement”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“All landowners who were foolish enough to stick around were shot. Communists see people only in simple categories.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“It was not Hansu that she missed, or even Isak. What she was seeing again in her dreams was her youth, her beginning, and her wishes--so this is how she became a woman.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“It was still hard for a Korean to become a Japanese citizen, and there were many who considered such a thing shameful—for a Korean to try to become a citizen of its former oppressor. When she told her friends in New York about this curious historical anomaly and the pervasive ethnic bias, they were incredulous at the thought that the friendly, well-mannered Japanese they knew could ever think she was somehow criminal, lazy, filthy, or aggressive—the negative stereotypical traits of Koreans in Japan.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“In the end, your belly was your emperor.”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko
“Life makes you pay...everybody pays something”
Min Jin Lee, Pachinko

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