Hölderlin, Kleist, and Nietzsche Quotes

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Hölderlin, Kleist, and Nietzsche: The Struggle with the Daemon Hölderlin, Kleist, and Nietzsche: The Struggle with the Daemon by Stefan Zweig
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Hölderlin, Kleist, and Nietzsche Quotes Showing 1-5 of 5
“¿No son hermanos tuyos todos los hombres? ¿No vendrá en tu auxilio hasta la misma Parca? Continúa, pues, marchando tranquilamente por el camino de tu vida; no temas nada, y bendice todo lo que acaeciere.”
Stefan Zweig, La lucha contra el demonio
“Ere long, however, the daemon was wrestling with him once more; he was seized by that “terrible spirit of unrest” which drove him “like the deluge, to the mountain peaks”. Shadows of gloom and discontent crept into his letters. He began to complain of his “dependent position”, and the forces at work within him soon became obvious. He could not endure regular occupation, could not bear to participate in the daily round of ordinary people. No existence other than that of a poet was acceptable. In this first crisis he probably failed to understand that the trouble sprang from the daemonism within him, from the jealous exclusiveness of the spirit that possessed him, making mundane relationships impossible. He still rationalised the immanent inflammability of his impulses by discovering objective causes for them. He spoke of his pupil’s stubbornness, of defects in the lad’s character which he, as tutor, was impotent to remedy. Hölderlin’s incapacity to meet the demands of everyday life was in this matter all too plain. The boy of nine had a stronger will than the man of twenty-five. The tutor resigned his post. Charlotte von Kalb, who was anything but obtuse, grasped the underlying truth. Wishing to console Johann Christian Friedrich’s mother, she wrote to the latter: “His spirit cannot stoop to these petty labours … or perhaps it would be more accurate to say that he takes them too much to heart.”
Stefan Zweig, The Struggle with the Daemon: Hölderlin, Kleist and Nietzsche
“Nietzsche’s own thoughts gathered around him and with which he was entrapped as by an impenetrable bell glass, a solitude wherein there were no flowers or colours or music or beasts or men, a solitude whence even God was excluded, the dead and petrified solitude of some primeval world which existed long ago or may come into being aeons hence.”
Stefan Zweig, The Struggle with the Daemon: Hölderlin, Kleist and Nietzsche
“queda expatriado para siempre y encuentra su verdadero " yo": príncipe sin ley, apátrida feliz, sin hogar, sin bienes, alejado para siempre de las mezquindades de la patria y de toda sujeción patriótica, ya no hay para él otra perspectiva que la vista de pájaro del " buen europeo", de "esta clase de hombre esencialmente nómada y que está más allá de la idea de nacionalidad", un nuevo hombre cuya llegada inevitable siente Nietzsche en la atmósfera, y en ese punto de vista fija su residencia, su reino, que pertenece al porvenir.”
Stefan Zweig, La lucha contra el demonio
“Şeytani demekle kastettiğim şey, her insanın temelinde ve özünde yatan o doğuştan gelen huzursuzluktur ve bu huzursuzluk onu kendinden çıkarır, onu kendinden alıp sonsuza, asıl olana sürükler, sanki doğa her bir ruhta, o ilk kaosun dışa vurulmamış, tedirgin bir parçasını bırakmıştır; bu parça ise gerilim ve tutku yoluyla o insanüstü, algı ötesi temeline geri dönmek ister.”
Stefan Zweig, Hölderlin, Kleist, and Nietzsche: The Struggle with the Daemon