Radical Dharma Quotes

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Radical Dharma: Talking Race, Love, and Liberation Radical Dharma: Talking Race, Love, and Liberation by Angel Kyodo Williams
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Radical Dharma Quotes Showing 1-12 of 12
“We simply cannot engage with either the ills or promises of society if we continue to turn a blind eye to the egregious and willful ignorance that enables us to still not “get it” in so many ways. It is by no means our making, but given the culture we are emerging from and immersed in, we are responsible. White folks’ particular reluctance to acknowledge impact as a collective while continuing to benefit from the construct of the collective leaves a wound intact without a dressing. The air needed to breathe through forgiveness is smothered. Healing is suspended for all. Truth is necessary for reconciliation. Will we express the promise of and commitment to liberation for all beings, or will we instead continue a hyper-individualized salvation model—the myth of meritocracy—that is the foundation of this country’s untruth?”
Angel Kyodo Williams, Radical Dharma: Talking Race, Love, and Liberation
“I’m thinking about my own liberation. I mean, I’m not liberated. Liberation is a process, and I think one of the first important things I had to do is stop believing in my inferiority. I”
Rev. Angel Kyodo Williams, Radical Dharma: Talking Race, Love, and Liberation
“the great fraud of the construct of whiteness is that it has coerced and convinced most white folks to no longer see their own oppression: by men over women, by straights over LGBT, by hetero fathers over their sons in arbitrating their masculinity, by capitalist values of personal acquisition over the personal freedom of one’s soul. white folks have been duped to trade their humanity for their privilege. the most insidious lie is that racism is a Black problem or colored folks problem. white folks wake up: not only oppressed people are complicit in oppression. it’s your problem, too.”
Angel Kyodo Williams, Radical Dharma: Talking Race, Love, and Liberation
“As Bruce Lee famously said, “Under duress, we do not rise to our expectations, but fall to our level of training.” Hundreds of years of living in a context designed by pillagers of the land and captors of people—without sufficient intervention—naturally establishes the curriculum of the training to which we fall. Our methodologies are forged within the default mindset of colonization, capitalism-as-religion, corporation-as-demigod, domination over people and planet, winner take all, rape and plunder as spoils of victory, human and natural resources taken as objects of subjugation to the land-owning, resource-controlling, very, very privileged few.”
Angel Kyodo Williams, Radical Dharma: Talking Race, Love, and Liberation
“Much of what is being taught is the acceptance of a “kinder, gentler suffering” that does not question the unwholesome roots of systemic suffering and the structures that hold it in place. What is required is a new Dharma, a radical Dharma that deconstructs rather than amplifies the systems of suffering, that starves rather than fertilizes the soil of the conditions that the deep roots of societal suffering grow in.”
Angel Kyodo Williams, Radical Dharma: Talking Race, Love, and Liberation
“Spiritual tradition is comfortable with paradox, whereas many political movements are not. But all truth is paradox. What it is to live in a space of transformative change is to engender greater and greater comfort with paradox. So that paradox becomes something that we not only acknowledge but also live more truthfully. We discover that Truth is relationship. And relationship is.”
Angel Kyodo Williams, Radical Dharma: Talking Race, Love, and Liberation
“Do we police because we fear we can be savages? Do our barricades from each other belie the blinds that keep us strangers to ourselves?”
Angel Kyodo Williams, Radical Dharma: Talking Race, Love, and Liberation
“The most profound practice I have ever been taught by my teachers is simply letting my shit fall apart, developing the courage to sit with all of my rough edges, the ugliness, the destructive and suffocating story lines I have perpetuated about myself, and letting go of the same suffocating storylines others maintain about me.”
Lama Rod Owens, Radical Dharma: Talking Race, Love, and Liberation
“But we also have to demystify this notion that somehow people of color have all the information and know it all and white folks don’t, and that it’s just like Black and white. Because it just isn’t. We have to really allow ourselves to create some space for people not knowing, not understanding, just saying stupid things. I mean stupid as in ignorant. That’s going to happen, and we have to figure out how to create room for that, rather than policing each other, so that people can actually get into the conversation. If someone is asking, there’s a willingness there. Treat that willingness as love, and treat it with love.”
Angel Kyodo Williams, Radical Dharma: Talking Race, Love, and Liberation
“I think we’re addicted to being triggered”
Angel Kyodo Williams, Radical Dharma: Talking Race, Love, and Liberation
“We all feel shame when we’re sitting on the cushion and stuff pops up in our head.”
Angel Kyodo Williams, Radical Dharma: Talking Race, Love, and Liberation
“To lean into this aspiration, you must confront the fact that “whiteness” is a social ego as void of inherent identity as the personal ego, and you have identified with it as much as your very own name, but without being willing to name it.”
Angel Kyodo Williams, Radical Dharma: Talking Race, Love, and Liberation