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Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist by Kate Raworth
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Doughnut Economics Quotes Showing 1-30 of 245
“Depicting rational economic man as an isolated individual – unaffected by the choices of others – proved highly convenient for modelling the economy, but it was long questioned even from within the discipline. At the end of the nineteenth century, the sociologist and economist Thorstein Veblen berated economic theory for depicting man as a ‘self-contained globule of desire’, while the French polymath Henri Poincaré pointed out that it overlooked ‘people’s tendency to act like sheep’.31 He was right: we are not so different from herds as we might like to imagine. We follow social norms, typically preferring to do what we expect others will do and, especially if filled with fear or doubt, we tend to go with the crowd. One”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“For over 70 years economics has been fixated on GDP, or national output, as its primary measure of progress. That fixation has been used to justify extreme inequalities of income and wealth coupled with unprecedented destruction of the living world. For the twenty-first century a far bigger goal is needed: meeting the human rights of every person within the means of our life-giving planet.”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“Here’s the conundrum: No country has ever ended human deprivation without a growing economy. And no country has ever ended ecological degradation with one.”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“Economics is the mother tongue of public policy,”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“Homo sapiens, it turns out, is the most cooperative species on the planet, outperforming ants, hyenas, and even the naked mole-rat when it comes to living alongside those who are beyond our next of kin.”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“Nudges and network effects often work because they tap into underlying norms and values—such as duty, respect and care—and those values can be activated directly.”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“In the words of the systems thinker John Sterman, ‘The most important assumptions of a model are not in the equations, but what’s not in them; not in the documentation, but unstated; not in the variables on the computer screen, but in the blank spaces around them’.”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“Despite their current rhetoric of ‘free trade’, when it comes to trade negotiations almost all of today’s high-income countries—including the UK and the United States—took the opposite route to ensure their own industrial success, opting for tariff protection, industrial subsidies and state-owned enterprises when it was nationally advantageous. And today they still keep tight control over their key traded assets such as intellectual property.”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“global greenhouse gas emissions is highly skewed: the top 10 percent of emitters—think of them as the global carbonistas living on every continent—generate around 45 percent of global emissions, while the bottom 50 percent of people contribute only 13 percent.”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“When Adam Smith, extolling the power of the market, noted that, ‘it is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker that we expect our dinner’, he forgot to mention the benevolence of his mother, Margaret Douglas, who had raised her boy alone from birth. Smith never married so had no wife to rely upon (nor children of his own to raise). At the age of 43, as he began to write his opus, The Wealth of Nations, he moved back in with his cherished old mum, from whom he could expect his dinner every day. But her role in it all never got a mention in his economic theory, and it subsequently remained invisible for centuries.”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“For the first time, ending human deprivation is becoming as much a question of tackling national distribution as of international redistribution, argues Andy Sumner, the expert who crunched the data on where the world’s poorest people now live.”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“The essence of that industrial system is the cradle-to-grave manufacturing supply chain of take, make, use, lose: extract Earth’s minerals, metals, biomass and fossil fuels; manufacture them into products; sell those on to consumers who—probably sooner rather than later—will throw them ‘away’.”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“This ubiquitous industrial model has delivered strong profits to many businesses and has financially enriched many nations in the process. But its design is fundamentally flawed because it runs counter to the living world, which thrives by continually recycling life’s building blocks such as carbon, oxygen, water, nitrogen and phosphorus”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“The East Asian ‘miracle’—from the mid 1960s to 1990—saw countries such as Japan, South Korea, Indonesia and Malaysia combine rapid economic growth with low inequality and falling poverty rates.”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“the returns to capital have tended to grow faster than the economy as a whole, leading wealth to become ever more concentrated. That dynamic is then reinforced through political influence—from corporate lobbying to campaign financing—that further promotes the interests of the already wealthy. In Piketty’s words, ‘Capitalism automatically generates arbitrary and unsustainable inequalities that radically undermine the meritocratic values on which democratic societies are based.”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“This stark picture of humanity and our planetary home at the start of the twenty-first century is a powerful indictment of the path of global economic development that has been pursued to date. Billions of people still fall far short of their most basic needs, but we have already crossed into global ecological danger zones that profoundly risk undermining Earth’s benevolent stability”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“EARTH, which is life giving—so respect its boundaries Far from floating against a white background, the economy exists within the biosphere—that delicate living zone of Earth’s land, waters and atmosphere. And it continually draws in energy and matter from Earth’s materials and living systems, while expelling waste heat and matter back out into it. Everything that is produced—from clay bricks to Lego blocks, websites to construction sites, liver pâté to patio furniture, single cream to double glazing—depends upon this throughflow of energy and matter, from biomass and fossil fuels to metal ores and minerals. None of this is news. But if the economy is so evidently embedded in the biosphere, how has economics so blatantly ignored”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“difference”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“At this point in human history, the movement that best describes the progress we need is coming into dynamic balance by moving into the Doughnut’s safe and just space, eliminating both its shortfall and overshoot at the same time.”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“jared_diamond_on_why_societies_collase”
Kate Raworth, Economía rosquilla: 7 maneras de pensar la economía del siglo XXI
“far from being a closed, circular loop, the economy is an open system with constant inflows and outflows of matter and energy. The economy depends upon Earth as a source—extracting finite resources such as oil, clay, cobalt and copper, and harvesting renewable ones such as timber, crops, fish and fresh water. The economy likewise depends upon Earth as a sink for its wastes—such as greenhouse gas emissions, fertiliser run-off and throwaway plastics. Earth itself, however, is a closed system because almost no matter leaves or arrives on this planet: energy from the sun may flow through it, but materials can only cycle within it.”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“Governments have historically opted to tax what they could, rather than what they should, and it shows.”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“We live now, says Daly, in ‘Full World’, with an economy that exceeds Earth’s regenerative and absorptive capacity by over-harvesting sources such as fish and forests, and over-filling sinks such as the atmosphere and oceans.”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“The vast majority of energy that powers today’s global economy is from the sun. Some of that solar energy, such as sunshine and wind, arrives in real time each day. Some has been stored in recent times, like the energy bound up in crops, livestock and trees. And some has been stored up since ancient times, particularly the fossil fuels of oil, coal and gas. Which of these sources of solar energy the economy uses matters a great deal, and here’s why. It was thanks to the balance between real-time solar energy entering Earth’s atmosphere and heat escaping back out into space that Earth maintained a steady and benevolent average temperature during the Holocene. Over the past two hundred years, however, and especially since 1950, humanity’s use of ancient fossil-fuel energy has released carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere at an entirely unprecedented rate, with potentially dangerous consequences. Most of these gases occur naturally in the atmosphere and, together with water vapour, act like a blanket around the Earth, keeping its surface much warmer than it otherwise would be.”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“as the architect and designer William McDonough has put it, the avid pursuit of resource efficiency is simply not enough. ‘Being less bad is not being good,’ he says. ‘It is being bad, just less so.’19 And once you think about it, pursuing mission zero is an odd vision for an industrial revolution, as if intentionally stopping on the threshold of something far more transformative. After all, if your factory can produce as much energy and clean water as it uses, why not see if it could produce more? If you can eliminate all toxic materials from your production process, why not introduce health-enhancing ones in their place? Instead of aiming merely to ‘do less bad’, industrial design can aim to ‘do more good’ by continually replenishing, rather than more slowly depleting, the living world. Why simply take nothing when you could also give something?”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“Oxford”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“From Taoism’s yin yang and the Māori takarangi to Buddhism’s endless knot and the Celtic double spiral, each design invokes a continual dynamic dance between complementary forces.”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“This wider perspective of the throughflow of energy and materials invites us to imagine the economy as a super-organism—think giant slug—that demands a continual intake of matter and energy from Earth’s sources, and delivers a continual stream of waste matter and waste heat into its sinks. On a planet with intricately structured ecosystems and a delicately balanced climate, this begs a now obvious question: how big can the global economy’s throughflow of matter and energy be in relation to the biosphere before it disrupts the very planetary life-support systems on which our well-being depends?”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“you need to know a thing or two about cuckoos because they are wily birds. Rather than raise their own offspring, they surreptitiously lay their eggs in the unguarded nests of other birds. The unsuspecting foster parents dutifully incubate the interloper’s egg along with their own. But the cuckoo chick hatches early, kicks other eggs and young out of the nest, then emits rapid calls to mimic a nest full of hungry offspring. This takeover tactic works: the foster parents busily feed their oversized tenant as it grows absurdly large, bulging out of the tiny nest it has occupied. It’s a powerful warning to other birds: leave your nest unattended and it may well get hijacked.”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist
“In the twentieth century, economics lost the desire to articulate its goals: in their absence, the economic nest got hijacked by the cuckoo goal of GDP growth.”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist

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