Sex & Rage Quotes

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Sex & Rage: Advice to Young Ladies Eager for a Good Time Sex & Rage: Advice to Young Ladies Eager for a Good Time by Eve Babitz
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Sex & Rage Quotes (showing 1-20 of 20)
“The two girls grew up at the edge of the ocean and knew it was paradise, and better than Eden, which was only a garden.”
Eve Babitz, Sex and Rage: Advice to Young Ladies Eager for a Good Time: A Novel
“It was all balance. But then, she already knew that from surfing.”
Eve Babitz, Sex and Rage: Advice to Young Ladies Eager for a Good Time: A Novel
“For the first six months, all whe wanted was honest labor, finely crafted novels, and surf.”
Eve Babitz, Sex and Rage: Advice to Young Ladies Eager for a Good Time: A Novel
“People go through life eating lamb chops and breaking their mother’s hearts.”
Eve Babitz, Sex and Rage: A Novel
“It made her question why human beings always appeared to be coming along so nicely as a whole when the bottom would fall out once again and they began collecting ears and filings from each other's heads.”
Eve Babitz, Sex & Rage: Advice to Young Ladies Eager for a Good Time
“Max's laugh was like a dragnet; it picked up every living laugh within the vicinity and shined a light on it, intensified it, pitched it higher. It was a dare--he dared you not to laugh with him. He dared you to despair. He dared you to insist that there was no dawn, that all there was was darkness, that there was no silver lining, that the heart didn't grow fonder by absence. He dared you to believe you were going to die--when you at that moment knew, just as he did, that you were immortal, you were among the gods.”
Eve Babitz, Sex and Rage: Advice to Young Ladies Eager for a Good Time: A Novel
“They must have begun in life knowing they were going to amount to something.”
Eve Babitz, Sex & Rage: Advice to Young Ladies Eager for a Good Time
“She figured that any day now she was going to start feeling the simple composure of normalcy that Jane Austen's heroines always sought to maintain, the state described in those days as "countenance," and later as "being cool.”
Eve Babitz, Sex & Rage: Advice to Young Ladies Eager for a Good Time
“Secrets are lies that you tell to your friends.”
Eve Babitz, Sex and Rage: A Novel
“watching their smoke lured out the window by the sun.”
Eve Babitz, Sex and Rage: A Novel
“She brought fresh flowers in from the tumbling-down hill where her landlady threw handfuls of wildflower seeds each spring.”
Eve Babitz, Sex and Rage: A Novel
“He smelled like a birthday party for small children, like vanilla, crêpe paper, soap, starch, and warm steam and cigarettes.”
Eve Babitz, Sex and Rage: A Novel
“The word “escape” had blown out the glow: it was so boring of these American women to imagine they were worth pursuing.”
Eve Babitz, Sex and Rage: A Novel
“She could get published in a sound journal that meant business and didn’t publish fly-by-nights. She was twenty-eight. It was time for her to O.D., not get published.”
Eve Babitz, Sex and Rage: A Novel
“writers all had drinking problems in the twentieth century, and once she got the $1,080 check, she was obviously a writer and it was obviously the twentieth century, so of course she had a drinking problem.”
Eve Babitz, Sex and Rage: A Novel
“She discovered what most writers insist is true nowadays, which is that they can only write for three hours a day at the most, so what else is there to do but drink?”
Eve Babitz, Sex and Rage: A Novel
“Everyone knew the way to dance was like black people did and they all danced that way.”
Eve Babitz, Sex and Rage: A Novel
“Sunrise went straight off to take a shower. Jacaranda left and returned from across the street, where she’d picked up two half-gallons of Iglenook Chablis, and poured herself a glass of cold wine. She looked out the window and tried to remember.”
Eve Babitz, Sex and Rage: A Novel
“Two days before she went to New York, Jacaranda stopped drinking.”
Eve Babitz, Sex and Rage: A Novel
“Jacaranda believed that in the world of airplanes there were only two kinds of luggage—carry-on or lost.”
Eve Babitz, Sex and Rage: A Novel