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Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters by Dick Winters
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Beyond Band of Brothers Quotes Showing 1-23 of 23
“One day my grandson said to me, grandpa were you a hero in the war? And i said to him no I'm not a hero, but I have served in a company full of them.”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
tags: war
“I certainly didn’t feel like writing anymore. I couldn’t explain why, but the only emotion that I could arouse were feelings of anger and after staying mad all day and half the night, I was just plain tired. Mad at what? Just about everything, for just about everything was done wrong or it wasn’t done perfectly. Since nothing but perfection was acceptable, I stayed mad.”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
“Lastly, ''Hang tough!'' Never, ever give up regardless of the adversity. If you are a leader, a fellow who other fellows look to, you have to keep going.”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
“There is no need to tell someone how to do his job if you have properly trained your team”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
“I Treasure a remark to my grandson who asked, "Grandpa were you a hero in the war?"
Grandpa said, "No.... but I served in a company of heroes”.
- Mike Ranney”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
“Captain Lewis Nixon and I were together every step of the way from D-Day to Berchtesgaden, May 8, 1945 - VE-Day. I still regard Lewis Nixon as the best combat officer who I had the opportunity to work with under fire. He never showed fear, and during the toughest times he could always think clearly and quickly. Very few men can remain poised under an artillery concentration. Nixon was one of those officers. He always trusted me, from the time we met at Officer Candidate School. While we were in training before we shipped overseas, Nixon hid his entire inventory of Vat 69 in my footlocker, under the tray holding my socks, underwear, and sweaters. What greater trust, what greater honor could I ask for than to be trusted with his precious inventory of Vat 69?”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
“Before I dozed off, I did not forget to get on my knees and thank God for helping me to live through this day and to ask His help on D+1. I would live this war one day at a time, and I promised myself that if I survived, I would find a small farm somewhere in the Pennsylvania countryside and spend the remainder of my life in quiet and peace.”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
“From a personal standpoint, I would have been devastated had Nixon been killed. As a leader you do not stop and calculate your losses during combat. You cannot stop a fight and ask yourself how many casualties you have sustained. You calculate losses only when the fight is over. Ever since the second week of the invasion, casualties had been my greatest concern. Victory would eventually be ours, but the casualties that had to be paid were the price that hurt. In that regard Nixon seemed a special case.”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
“Floyd Talbert wrote shortly before his death, “Dick, you are loved and will never be forgotten by any soldier who ever served under you. You are the best friend I ever had…you were my ideal, and motor in combat…you are to me the greatest soldier I could ever hope to meet.”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
“Far more humbling to me was a letter I received years later from Sergeant Talbert. Referring to the attack at the intersection, he wrote, “Seeing you in the middle of that road, wanting to move, was too much. You were my total inspiration. All my boys felt the same way.” “Tab” was far too generous with his compliments. His own action at Carentan personified his excellence as both a soldier and a leader. He helped clear that intersection and carried a wounded Lipton to safety. Later when the Germans finally counterattacked, Talbert was everywhere, directing his men to the right place, supervising their fire, before he himself was wounded and evacuated.”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
“After ten months of infantry training, I realized my survival would depend on the men around me. Airborne troopers looked like I had always pictured a group of soldiers: hard, lean, bronzed, and tough. When they walked down the street, they appeared to be a proud and cocky bunch exhibiting a tolerant scorn for anyone who was not airborne.”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
“Ten Principles for Success Strive to be a leader of character, competence, and courage. Lead from the front. Say, “Follow me!” and then lead the way. Stay in top physical shape—physical stamina is the root of mental toughness. Develop your team. If you know your people, are fair in setting realistic goals and expectations, and lead by example, you will develop teamwork. Delegate responsibility to your subordinates and let them do their jobs. You can’t do a good job if you don’t have a chance to use your imagination or your creativity. Anticipate problems and prepare to overcome obstacles. Don’t wait until you get to the top of the ridge and then make up your mind. Remain humble. Don’t worry about who receives the credit. Never let power or authority go to your head. Take a moment of self-reflection. Look at yourself in the mirror every night and ask yourself if you did your best. True satisfaction comes from getting the job done. The key to a successful leader is to earn respect—not because of rank or position, but because you are a leader of character. Hang Tough!—Never, ever, give up.”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
“What bothered Easy Company’s officers, me included, was not Sobel’s emphasis on strict discipline, but his desire to lead by fear rather than example.”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
“For all his faults, Captain Sobel had seen that the men were highly proficient in conducting nocturnal patrols and movement. The problems associated with forced marches across country, through woods, night compass problems, errors in celestial navigation, had all been overcome in the months preceding D-Day. Prior to the invasion, Easy Company had experienced every conceivable problem of troop movement under conditions of limited visibility.”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
“First and foremost, a leader should strive to be an individual of flawless character, technical competence, and moral courage.”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
“I would also urge leaders to remain humble. If you don’t worry about who gets the credit, you get a lot more done.”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
“I learned a valuable lesson that nothing is ever guaranteed. However, you adjust; you get used to the little things and hope for the best.”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
“I still wore the rank of a 1st lieutenant. But that was okay because I knew my job, my company, the men, and I felt confident that under fire, I had the right answers. Which gets me to the point: I was a “half-breed.” An officer yes, but at heart an enlisted man.”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
“British antiaircraft units stationed at the field, and that was the first time I’d ever seen any real emotion from a limey. They actually had tears in their eyes. You could see that they felt like hell standing there watching us go into battle even though”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
“My only concern was whether or not I would let my men down once we entered combat. As a fighting company the men were primed and ready to go, and we fully intended that we were either going to win the ensuing battle or be killed.”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
“later learned that the aircraft carrying Lieutenant Thomas Meehan, 1st Sergeant William Evans, and most of the headquarters element, flew steadily onward, and then did a slow wingover to the right. The plane’s landing lights came on as it approached the ground. It appeared they were going to make it, but the aircraft hit a hedgerow and exploded, instantly killing everyone on board. If I survived the jump, I would be the company commander.”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
“As we departed the airfield at Uppottery, the aircraft climbed to the assembly altitude of 1,500 feet and flew in a holding pattern until the entire formation turned on course at 1142 hours to join the stream of planes converging on the coast of France. Descending to an altitude of 1,000 feet, the pilots maintained course until they neared the Normandy course, at which time they descended to 500 feet. The optimum altitude for a drop was 600 feet at a speed of 100 to 120 knots to preclude excessive prop-wash and needless exposure to enemy fire. Twenty minutes out, Lieutenant Sammons hollered back and the crew chief removed the door.”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters
“Only later did we discover that our planned drop zone had been strongly covered by the enemy with rifle pits and automatic weapons all around its perimeter. Had the drop taken place as planned, it was quite possible “that the greater breadth of the target would have given the waiting Germans a greatly enhanced opportunity for killing.” Planned or not, Easy Company was scattered across a wide dispersal area several miles west of our objective. How the remainder of the”
Dick Winters, Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters