A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis Quotes

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A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis by Sigmund Freud
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A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis Quotes Showing 1-14 of 14
“It is a predisposition of human nature to consider an unpleasant idea untrue, and then it is easy to find arguments against it.”
Sigmund Freud, A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis
“Words were originally magic, and the word retains much of its old magical power even to-day. With words one man can make another blessed, or drive him to despair; by words the teacher transfers his knowledge to the pupil; by words the speaker sweeps his audience with him and determines its judgments and decisions. Words call forth effects and are the universal means of influencing human beings.”
Sigmund Freud, A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis
“For there is a way back from imagination to reality and that is—art.”
Sigmund Freud, A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis
“With words one man can make another blessed, or drive him to despair;”
Sigmund Freud, A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis
“Everyone of us who can look back over a longer or shorter life experience will probably say that he might have spared himself many disappointments and painful surprises if he had found the courage and decision to interpret as omens the little mistakes which he made in his intercourse with people, and to consider them as indications of the intentions which were still being kept secret. As”
Sigmund Freud, A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis
“One must be humble, one must keep personal preferences and antipathies in the background, if one wishes to discover the realities of the world.”
Sigmund Freud, A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis
“Words call forth effects and are the universal means of influencing human beings.”
Sigmund Freud, A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis
“One can make a compound formation of events and of places in the same way as of people, provided always that the single events and localities have something in common which the latent dream emphasizes. It is a sort of new and fleeting concept of formation, with the common element as its kernel. This jumble of details that has been fused together regularly results in a vague indistinct picture, as though you had taken several pictures on the same film.”
Sigmund Freud, A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis
“Words were originally magic, and the word retains much of its old magical power even to-day. With words one man can make another blessed, or drive him to despair; by words the teacher transfers his knowledge to the pupil; by words the speaker sweeps his audience with him and determines its judgments and decisions. Words call forth effects and are the universal means of influencing human beings. Therefore let us not underestimate the use of words in psychotherapy, and let us be satisfied if we may be auditors of the words which are exchanged between the analyst and his patient.”
Sigmund Freud, A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis
“Yet we see, on the contrary, that many acts are most successfully carried out when they are not the objects of particularly concentrated attention, and that the mistakes occur just at the point where one is most anxious to be accurate—where a distraction of the necessary attention is therefore surely least permissible. One could then say that this is the effect of the "excitement," but we do not understand why the excitement does not intensify the concentration of attention on the goal that is so much desired.”
Sigmund Freud, A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis
“But it is a predisposition of human nature to consider an unpleasant idea untrue, and then it is easy to find arguments against it. Society”
Sigmund Freud, A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis
“WE think we have advanced too rapidly. Let us go back a little. Before our last attempt to overcome the difficulties of dream distortion through our technique, we had decided that it would be best to avoid them by limiting ourselves only to those dreams in which distortion is either entirely absent or of trifling importance, if there are such. But here again we digress from the history of the evolution of our knowledge, for as a matter of fact we become aware of dreams entirely free of distortion only after the consistent application of our method of interpretation and after complete analysis of the distorted dream.”
Sigmund Freud, A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis
“But it is a predisposition of human nature to consider an unpleasant idea untrue, and then it is easy to find arguments against it. Society thus brands what is unpleasant as untrue, denying the conclusions of psychoanalysis with logical and pertinent arguments. These arguments originate from affective sources, however, and society holds to these prejudices against all attempts at refutation.”
Sigmund Freud, A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis
“Words were originally magic, and the word retains much of its old magical power even to-day. With words one man can make another blessed, or drive him to despair; by words the teacher transfers his knowledge to the pupil; by words the speaker sweeps his audience with him and determines its judgments and decisions. Words call forth effects and are the universal means of influencing human beings. Therefore”
Sigmund Freud, A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis