Tribe Quotes

Rate this book
Clear rating
Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging by Sebastian Junger
25,375 ratings, 4.04 average rating, 2,811 reviews
Open Preview
Tribe Quotes Showing 1-30 of 156
“Humans don’t mind hardship, in fact they thrive on it; what they mind is not feeling necessary. Modern society has perfected the art of making people not feel necessary. It's time for that to end.”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“human beings need three basic things in order to be content: they need to feel competent at what they do; they need to feel authentic in their lives; and they need to feel connected to others. These values are considered "intrinsic" to human happiness and far outweigh "extrinsic" values such as beauty, money and status.”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“The public is often accused of being disconnected from its military, but frankly it's disconnected from just about everything. Farming, mineral extraction, gas and oil production, bulk cargo transport, logging, fishing, infrastructure construction—all the industries that keep the nation going are mostly unacknowledged by the people who depend on them most.”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“In this sense, littering is an exceedingly petty version of claiming a billion-dollar bank bailout or fraudulently claiming disability payments. When you throw trash on the ground, you apparently don’t see yourself as truly belonging to the world that you’re walking around in. And when you fraudulently claim money from the government, you are ultimately stealing from your friends, family, and neighbors—or somebody else’s friends, family, and neighbors. That diminishes you morally far more than it diminishes your country financially.”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“What would you risk dying for—and for whom—is perhaps the most profound question a person can ask themselves. The vast majority of people in modern society are able to pass their whole lives without ever having to answer that question, which is both an enormous blessing and a significant loss.”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“How do you become an adult in a society that doesn’t ask for sacrifice? How do you become a man in a world that doesn’t require courage?”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“Humans don't mind hardship, in fact they thrive on it; what they mind is not feeling necessary. Modern society has perfected the art of making people not feel necessary.”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“Unlike criticism, contempt is particularly toxic because it assumes a moral superiority in the speaker. Contempt is often directed at people who have been excluded from a group or declared unworthy of its benefits. Contempt is often used by governments to provide rhetorical cover for torture or abuse. Contempt is one of four behaviors that, statistically, can predict divorce in married couples. People who speak with contempt for one another will probably not remain united for long. The”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“When people are actively engaged in a cause their lives have more purpose... with a resulting improvement in mental health,”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“The most alarming rhetoric comes out of the dispute between liberals and conservatives, and it’s a dangerous waste of time because they’re both right.
...
If you want to make a society work, then you don’t keep underscoring the places where you’re different—you underscore your shared humanity,”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“Because modern society has almost completely eliminated trauma and violence from everyday life, anyone who does suffer those things is deemed to be extraordinarily unfortunate. This gives people access to sympathy and resources but also creates an identity of victimhood that can delay recovery.”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“Today's veterans often come home to find that, although they're willing to die for their country, they're not sure how to live for it.”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“If you want to make a society work, then you don’t keep underscoring the places where you’re different—you underscore your shared humanity,”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“In effect, humans have dragged a body with a long hominid history into an overfed, malnourished, sedentary, sunlight-deficient, sleep-deprived, competitive, inequitable, and socially-isolating environment with dire consequences.” The”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“It may be worth considering whether middle-class American life—for all its material good fortune—has lost some essential sense of unity that might otherwise discourage alienated men from turning apocalyptically violent.”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“When you throw trash on the ground, you apparently don't see yourself as truly belonging to the world that you're walking in.”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“An earthquake achieves what the law promises but does not in practice maintain," one of the survivors wrote. "The equality of all men".”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“I know what coming back to America from a war zone is like because I’ve done it so many times. First, there’s a kind of shock at the comfort and affluence that we enjoy, but that is followed by the dismal realization that we live in a society that is basically at war with itself. People speak with incredible contempt about, depending on their views: the rich, the poor, the educated, the foreign born, the President, or the entire US government. It is a level of contempt that is usually reserved for enemies in wartime except that now it is applied to our fellow citizens. Unlike criticism, contempt is particularly toxic because it assumes a moral superiority in the speaker. Contempt is often directed at people who have been excluded from a group or declared unworthy its benefits. Contempt is often used by governments to provide rhetorical cover for torture or abuse. Contempt is one of four behaviors that, statistically, can predict divorce in married couples. People who speak with contempt for one another will probably not remain united for long.”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“What I had was classic short-term PTSD. From an evolutionary perspective, it’s exactly the response you want to have when your life is in danger: you want to be vigilant, you want to avoid situations where you are not in control, you want to react to strange noises, you want to sleep lightly and wake easily, you want to have flashbacks and nightmares that remind you of specific threats to your life, and you want to be, by turns, angry and depressed. Anger keeps you ready to fight, and depression keeps you from being too active and putting yourself in more danger. Flashbacks also serve to remind you of the danger that’s out there—a “highly efficient single-event survival-learning mechanism,” as one researcher termed it. All humans react to trauma in this way, and most mammals do as well. It may be unpleasant, but it’s preferable to getting killed. Like”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“A modern soldier returning from combat---or a survivor of Sarajevo---goes from the kind of close-knit group that humans evolved for, back into a society where most people work outside the home, children are educated by strangers, families ae isolated from wider communities, and personal gain almost completely eclipses collective good. Even if he or she is part of a family, that is not the same as belonging to a group that shares resources and experiences almost everything collectively. Whatever the technological advances of modern society---and they're nearly miraculous---the individualized lifestyles that those technologies spawn seem to be deeply brutalizing to the human spirit.”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“The beauty and the tragedy of the modern world is that it eliminates many situations that require people to demonstrate a commitment to the collective good.”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“As affluence and urbanization rise in a society, rates of depression and suicide tend to go up rather than down.”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“Disasters, he proposed, create a "community of sufferers" that allow individuals to experience an immensely reassuring connection to others”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“You don’t owe your country nothing,” I remember him telling me. “You owe it something, and depending on what happens, you might owe it your life.”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“in keeping with something called self-determination theory, which holds that human beings need three basic things in order to be content: they need to feel competent at what they do; they need to feel authentic in their lives; and they need to feel connected to others.”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“Modern society has perfected the art of making people not feel necessary.”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“The”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“How do you become an adult in a society that doesn’t ask for sacrifice? How do you become a man in a world that doesn’t require courage? Those”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“Women tend to act heroically within their own moral universe, regardless of whether anyone else knows about it - donating more kidneys to nonrelatives than men do, for example. Men, on the other hand, are far more likely to risk their lives at a moment's notice, and that reaction is particularly strong when others are watching, or when they are part of a group.”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging
“PTSD is a disorder of recovery, and if treatment only focuses on identifying symptoms, it pathologizes and alienates vets. But if the focus is on family and community, it puts them in a situation of collective healing.” Israel”
Sebastian Junger, Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging

« previous 1 3 4 5 6