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My Man Jeeves (Jeeves, #1) My Man Jeeves by P.G. Wodehouse
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My Man Jeeves Quotes (showing 1-30 of 48)
“What ho!" I said.
"What ho!" said Motty.
"What ho! What ho!"
"What ho! What ho! What ho!"
After that it seemed rather difficult to go on with the conversation.”
Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“I'm not absolutely certain of my facts, but I rather fancy it's Shakespeare -- or, if not, it's some equally brainy lad -- who says that it's always just when a chappie is feeling particularly top-hole, and more than usually braced with things in general that Fate sneaks up behind him with a bit of lead piping.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“What a queer thing Life is! So unlike anything else, don't you know, if you see what I mean.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“Have you ever been turned down by a girl who afterwards married and then been introduced to her husband? If so you'll understand how I felt when Clarence burst on me. You know the feeling. First of all, when you hear about the marriage, you say to yourself, "I wonder what he's like." Then you meet him, and think, "There must be some mistake. She can't have preferred this to me!”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
tags: humor
“It was a nasty look. It made me feel as if I were something the dog had brought in and intended to bury later on, when he had time.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“...there occurred to me the simple epitaph which, when I am no more, I intend to have inscribed on my tombstone. It was this:
"He was a man who acted from the best motives. There is one born every minute.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“And so the merry party began. It was one of those jolly, happy, bread-crumbling parties where you cough twice before you speak, and then decide not to say it after all.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“As I stood in my lonely bedroom at the hotel, trying to tie my white tie myself, it struck me for the first time that there must be whole squads of chappies in the world who had to get along without a man to look after them. I'd always thought of Jeeves as a kind of natural phenomenon; but, by Jove! of course, when you come to think of it, there must be quite a lot of fellows who have to press their own clothes themselves and haven't got anybody to bring them tea in the morning, and so on. It was rather a solemn thought, don't you know. I mean to say, ever since then I've been able to appreciate the frightful privations the poor have to stick.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“Birds, except when broiled and in the society of a cold bottle, bored him stiff.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“The funny thing was that he wasn't altogether a fool in other ways. Deep down in him there was a kind of stratum of sense. I had known him, once or twice, show an almost human intelligence. But to reach that stratum, mind you, you needed dynamite.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“Sir?” said Jeeves, kind of manifesting himself. One of the rummy things about Jeeves is that, unless you watch like a hawk, you very seldom see him come into a room. He’s like one of those weird chappies in India who dissolve themselves into thin air and nip through space in a sort of disembodied way and assemble the parts again just where they want them. I’ve got a cousin who’s what they call a Theosophist, and he says he’s often nearly worked the thing himself, but couldn’t quite bring it off, probably owing to having fed in his boyhood on the flesh of animals slain in anger and pie.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“I'm a bit short on brain myself; the old bean would appear to have been constructed more for ornament than for use, don't you know...”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
tags: brains
“You see, the catch about portrait painting—
I've looked into the thing a bit— is that you can't start
painting portraits till people come along and ask you to, and
they won't come and ask you to until you've painted a lot first.
This makes it kind of difficult for a chappie.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“It's brain," I said; "pure brain! What do you do to get like that, Jeeves? I believe you must eat a lot of fish, or something. Do you eat a lot of fish, Jeeves?"
"No, sir."
"Oh, well, then, it's just a gift, I take it; and if you aren't born that way there's no use worrying.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“She was one of those women who kind of numb a fellow's faculties. She made me feel as if I were ten years old and had been brought into the drawing-room in my Sunday clothes to say how-d'you-do.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“I'm bound to say that New York's a topping place to be exiled in. Everybody was awfully good to me, and there seemed to be plenty of things going on, and I'm a wealthy bird, so everything was fine.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“But then, at meals, my attention is pretty well riveted on the foodstuffs.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“I had one of those ideas I do sometimes get, though admittedly a chump of the premier class.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“What I mean is, if you're absolutely off your rocker, but don't find it convenient to be scooped into the luny-bin, you simply explain that, when you said you were a teapot, it was just your Artistic Temperament, and they apologize and go away. So I stood by to hear just how the A.T. had affected Clarence, the Cat's Friend, ready for anything.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“I read it twice, then I said, "Well, why don't you?"
"Why don't I what?"
"Why don't you wish her many happy returns? It doesn't seem much to ask."
"But she says on her birthday."
"Well, when is her birthday?"
"Can't you understand?" said Bobbie. "I've forgotten."
"Forgotten!" I said.
"Yes," said Bobbie. "Forgotten."
"How do you mean, forgotten?" I said. "Forgotten whether it's the twentieth or the twenty-first, or what? How near do you get to it?"
"I know it came somewhere between the first of January and the thirty-first of December. That's how near I get to it.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“That's always the way in this world. The chappies you'd like to lend money to won't let you, whereas the chappies you don't want to lend it to will do everything except actually stand you on your head and lift the specie out of your pockets.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“As a rule, from what I've observed, the American captain of industry doesn't do anything out of business hours. When he has put the cat out and locked up the office for the night, he just relapses into a state of coma from which he emerges only to start being a captain of industry again.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“On broader lines he's like those chappies who sit peering sadly over the marble battlements at the Pennsylvania Station in the place marked "Inquiries." You know the Johnnies I mean. You go up to them and say: "When's the next train for Melonsquashville, Tennessee?" and they reply, without stopping to think, "Two-forty-three, track ten, change at San Francisco." And they're right every time. Well, Jeeves gives you just the same impression of omniscience.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“I spent the afternoon musing on Life. If you come to think of it, what a queer thing Life is! So unlike anything else, don't you know, if you see what I mean. At any moment you may be strolling peacefully along, and all the time Life's waiting around the corner to fetch you one. You can't tell when you may be going to get it. It's all dashed puzzling. Here was poor old George, as well-meaning a fellow as every stepped, getting swatted all over the ring by the hand of Fate. Why? That's what I asked myself. Just Life, don't you know. That's all there was about it.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
tags: fate, life
“Come on," he said. "Bring the poker."
I brought the tongs as well. I felt like it.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“Just then the kid upset the milk over Freddie's trousers, and when he had come back after changing his clothes he began to talk about what a much-maligned man King Herod was.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“When Nature makes a chump like dear old Bobbie, she's proud of him, and doesn't want her handiwork disturbed. She gives him a sort of natural armour to protect him against outside interference. And that armour is shortness of memory. Shortness of memory keeps a man a chump, when, but for it, he might cease to be one.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“I hardly knew what to do. I wanted, of course, to rush down to Washington Square and grip the poor blighter silently by the hand; and then, thinking it over, I hadn't the nerve. Absent treatment seemed the touch. I gave it him in waves.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“It's a mystery to me how kidnappers ever get caught.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves
“there occurred to me the simple epitaph which, when I am no more, I intend to have inscribed on my tombstone. It was this: "He was a man who acted from the best motives. There is one born every minute.”
P.G. Wodehouse, My Man Jeeves

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