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Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World by Cal Newport
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“If you don’t produce, you won’t thrive—no matter how skilled or talented you are.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“Clarity about what matters provides clarity about what does not.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“Who you are, what you think, feel, and do, what you love—is the sum of what you focus on.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“Two Core Abilities for Thriving in the New Economy 1. The ability to quickly master hard things. 2. The ability to produce at an elite level, in terms of both quality and speed.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“what we choose to focus on and what we choose to ignore—plays in defining the quality of our life.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“As the author Tim Ferriss once wrote: “Develop the habit of letting small bad things happen. If you don’t, you’ll never find time for the life-changing big things.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“To simply wait and be bored has become a novel experience in modern life, but from the perspective of concentration training, it’s incredibly valuable.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“if you keep interrupting your evening to check and respond to e-mail, or put aside a few hours after dinner to catch up on an approaching deadline, you’re robbing your directed attention centers of the uninterrupted rest they need for restoration. Even if these work dashes consume only a small amount of time, they prevent you from reaching the levels of deeper relaxation in which attention restoration can occur. Only the confidence that you’re done with work until the next day can convince your brain to downshift to the level where it can begin to recharge for the next day to follow. Put another way, trying to squeeze a little more work out of your evenings might reduce your effectiveness the next day enough that you end up getting less done than if you had instead respected a shutdown.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“If you can’t learn, you can’t thrive.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“(As Nietzsche said: “It is only ideas gained from walking that have any worth.”)”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“Another key commitment for succeeding with this strategy is to support your commitment to shutting down with a strict shutdown ritual that you use at the end of the workday to maximize the probability that you succeed. In more detail, this ritual should ensure that every incomplete task, goal, or project has been reviewed and that for each you have confirmed that either (1) you have a plan you trust for its completion, or (2) it’s captured in a place where it will be revisited when the time is right. The process should be an algorithm: a series of steps you always conduct, one after another. When you’re done, have a set phrase you say that indicates completion (to end my own ritual, I say, “Shutdown complete”). This final step sounds cheesy, but it provides a simple cue to your mind that it’s safe to release work-related thoughts for the rest of the day.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“The task of a craftsman, they conclude, “is not to generate meaning, but rather to cultivate in himself the skill of discerning the meanings that are already there.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“We tend to place a lot of emphasis on our circumstances, assuming that what happens to us (or fails to happen) determines how we feel. From this perspective, the small-scale details of how you spend your day aren’t that important, because what matters are the large-scale outcomes, such as whether or not you get a promotion or move to that nicer apartment. According to Gallagher, decades of research contradict this understanding. Our brains instead construct our worldview based on what we pay attention to.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“Efforts to deepen your focus will struggle if you don’t simultaneously wean your mind from a dependence on distraction.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“If you service low-impact activities, therefore, you're taking away time you could be spending on higher-impact activities. It's a zero-sum game.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“Human beings, it seems, are at their best when immersed deeply in something challenging. There”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“In this new economy, three groups will have a particular advantage: those who can work well and creatively with intelligent machines, those who are the best at what they do, and those with access to capital.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“Once your brain has become accustomed to on-demand distraction, Nass discovered, it’s hard to shake the addiction even when you want to concentrate. To put this more concretely: If every moment of potential boredom in your life—say, having to wait five minutes in line or sit alone in a restaurant until a friend arrives—is relieved with a quick glance at your smartphone, then your brain has likely been rewired to a point where, like the “mental wrecks” in Nass’s research, it’s not ready for deep work—even if you regularly schedule time to practice this concentration.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“Less mental clutter means more mental resources available for deep thinking.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“Your will, in other words, is not a manifestation of your character that you can deploy without limit; it’s instead like a muscle that tires.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“Ironically, jobs are actually easier to enjoy than free time, because like flow activities they have built-in goals, feedback rules, and challenges, all of which encourage one to become involved in one’s work, to concentrate and lose oneself in it. Free time, on the other hand, is unstructured, and requires much greater effort to be shaped into something that can be enjoyed.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“Ericsson notes that for a novice, somewhere around an hour a day of intense concentration seems to be a limit, while for experts this number can expand to as many as four hours—but rarely more.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“To remain valuable in our economy, therefore, you must master the art of quickly learning complicated things. This task requires deep work. If you don’t cultivate this ability, you’re likely to fall behind as technology advances. The”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“Your goal is not to stick to a given schedule at all costs; it’s instead to maintain, at all times, a thoughtful say in what you’re doing with your time going forward—even”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“This, ultimately, is the lesson to come away with from our brief foray into the world of experimental psychology: To build your working life around the experience of flow produced by deep work is a proven path to deep satisfaction.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“To produce at your peak level you need to work for extended periods with full concentration on a single task free from distraction. Put another way, the type of work that optimizes your performance is deep work.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“A side effect of memory training, in other words, is an improvement in your general ability to concentrate. This ability can then be fruitfully applied to any task demanding deep work.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“The Deep Work Hypothesis: The ability to perform deep work is becoming increasingly rare at exactly the same time it is becoming increasingly valuable in our economy. As a consequence, the few who cultivate this skill, and then make it the core of their working life, will thrive.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“Like fingers pointing to the moon, other diverse disciplines from anthropology to education, behavioral economics to family counseling, similarly suggest that the skillful management of attention is the sine qua non of the good life and the key to improving virtually every aspect of your experience.”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
“the hospital after the diagnosis she formed a sudden and strong intuition: “This disease wanted to monopolize my attention, but as much as possible, I would focus on my life instead.” The cancer treatment that followed was exhausting and terrible, but Gallagher couldn’t help noticing, in that corner of her brain honed by a career in nonfiction writing, that her commitment to focus on what was good in her life—“movies, walks, and a 6:30 martini”—worked surprisingly well. Her life during this period should have been mired in fear”
Cal Newport, Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World

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