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Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World by Adam M. Grant
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“In the deepest sense of the word, a friend is someone who sees more potential in you than you see in yourself, someone who helps you become the best version of yourself.”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“Argue like you’re right and listen like you’re wrong.”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“Being original doesn’t require being first. It just means being different and better.”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“Practice makes perfect, but it doesn’t make new.”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.” George Bernard Shaw”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“Procrastination may be the enemy of productivity, but it can be a resource for creativity.”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“To become original, you have to try something new, which means accepting some measure of risk.”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep.”
Adam Grant, Originals: How Non-conformists Change the World
“This explains why we often undercommunicate our ideas. They’re already so familiar to us that we underestimate how much exposure an audience needs to comprehend and buy into them. When”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“In these pages, I learned that great creators don’t necessarily have the deepest expertise but rather seek out the broadest perspectives.”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“The greatest shapers don’t stop at introducing originality into the world. They create cultures that unleash originality in others.”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“Shapers” are independent thinkers: curious, non-conforming, and rebellious. They practice brutal, nonhierarchical honesty. And they act in the face of risk, because their fear of not succeeding exceeds their fear of failing.”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“I arise in the morning torn between a desire to improve the world and a desire to enjoy the world,” E. B. White once wrote. “This makes it difficult to plan the day.”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“When we use the logic of consequence, we can always find reasons not to take risks. The”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“The least favorite students were the non-conformists who made up their own rules. Teachers tend to discriminate against highly creative students, labeling them as troublemakers. In”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“Having a sense of security in one realm gives us the freedom to be original in another.”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“Passionate people don’t wear their passion on their sleeves; they have it in their hearts.” The”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“If we communicate the vision behind our ideas, the purpose guiding our products, people will flock to us.”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“People who suffer the most from a given state of affairs are paradoxically the least likely to question, challenge, reject, or change it.”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“Timing accounted for forty-two percent of the difference between success and failure.”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“If originals aren’t reliable judges of the quality of their ideas, how do they maximize their odds of creating a masterpiece? They come up with a large number of ideas. Simonton finds that on average, creative geniuses weren’t qualitatively better in their fields than their peers. They simply produced a greater volume of work, which gave them more variation and a higher chance of originality. “The odds of producing an influential or successful idea,” Simonton notes, are “a positive function of the total number of ideas generated.”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“If you’re going to build a strong culture, it’s paramount to make diversity one of your core values. This is what separates Bridgewater’s strong culture from a cult: The commitment is to promoting dissent. In hiring, instead of using similarity to gauge cultural fit, Bridgewater assesses cultural contribution.* Dalio wants people who will think independently and enrich the culture. By holding them accountable for dissenting, Dalio has fundamentally altered the way people make decisions. In a cult, core values are dogma. At Bridgewater, employees are expected to challenge the principles themselves. During training, when employees learn the principles, they’re constantly asked: Do you agree? “We have these standards that are stress tested over time, and you have to either operate by them or disagree with them and fight for better ones,” explains Zack Wieder, who works with Dalio on codifying the principles. Rather than deferring to the people with the greatest seniority or status, as was the case at Polaroid, decisions at Bridgewater are based on quality. The goal is to create an idea meritocracy, where the best ideas win. To get the best ideas on the table in the first place, you need radical transparency. Later, I’m going to challenge some of Dalio’s principles, but first I want to explain the weapons he has used to wage a war on groupthink.”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“When we're determined to reach an objective, it's the gap between where we are and where we aspire to be that lights a fire under us.”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World
“At its core, comedy is an act of rebellion. Evidence shows that compared to the norms in the population, comedians tend to be more original and rebellious—and the higher they score on these dimensions, the more professional success they attain. After”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“When our commitment is wavering, the best way to stay on track is to consider the progress we've already made. As we recognize what we've invested and attained, it seems like a waste to give up, and our confidence and commitment surge.”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World
“In every field, even the most eminent creators typically produce a large quantity of work that’s technically sound but considered unremarkable by experts and audiences. When the London Philharmonic Orchestra chose the 50 greatest pieces of classical music, the list included six pieces by Mozart, five by Beethoven, and three by Bach.14 To generate a handful of masterworks, Mozart composed more than 600 pieces before his death at thirty-five, Beethoven produced 650 in his lifetime, and Bach wrote over a thousand.”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Non-conformists Change the World
“Conviction in our ideas is dangerous not only because it leaves us vulnerable to false positives, but also because it stops us from generating the requisite variety to reach our creative potential.”
Adam Grant, Originals: How Non-conformists Change the World
“Entrepreneurs who kept their day jobs had 33 percent lower odds of failure than those who quit. If you’re risk averse and have some doubts about the feasibility of your ideas, it’s likely that your business will be built to last. If you’re a freewheeling gambler, your startup is far more fragile. Like the Warby Parker crew, the entrepreneurs whose companies topped Fast Company’s recent most innovative lists typically stayed in their day jobs even after they launched. Former track star Phil Knight started selling running shoes out of the trunk of his car in 1964, yet kept working as an accountant until 1969. After inventing the original Apple I computer, Steve Wozniak started the company with Steve Jobs in 1976 but continued working full time in his engineering job at Hewlett-Packard until 1977. And although Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin figured out how to dramatically improve internet searches in 1996, they didn’t go on leave from their graduate studies at Stanford until 1998. “We almost didn’t start Google,” Page says, because we “were too worried about dropping out of our Ph.D. program.” In 1997, concerned that their fledgling search engine was distracting them from their research, they tried to sell Google for less than $2 million in cash and stock. Luckily for them, the potential buyer rejected the offer. This habit of keeping one’s day job isn’t limited to successful entrepreneurs. Many influential creative minds have stayed in full-time employment or education even after earning income from major projects. Selma director Ava DuVernay made her first three films while working in her day job as a publicist, only pursuing filmmaking full time after working at it for four years and winning multiple awards. Brian May was in the middle of doctoral studies in astrophysics when he started playing guitar in a new band, but he didn’t drop out until several years later to go all in with Queen. Soon thereafter he wrote “We Will Rock You.” Grammy winner John Legend released his first album in 2000 but kept working as a management consultant until 2002, preparing PowerPoint presentations by day while performing at night. Thriller master Stephen King worked as a teacher, janitor, and gas station attendant for seven years after writing his first story, only quitting a year after his first novel, Carrie, was published. Dilbert author Scott Adams worked at Pacific Bell for seven years after his first comic strip hit newspapers. Why did all these originals play it safe instead of risking it all?”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“On matters of style, swim with the current,” Thomas Jefferson allegedly advised, but “on matters of principle, stand like a rock.” The pressure to achieve leads us to do the opposite. We find surface ways of appearing original—donning a bow tie, wearing bright red shoes—without taking the risk of actually being original. When it comes to the powerful ideas in our heads and the core values in our hearts, we censor ourselves.”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World
“Overall, the evidence suggests that liking continues to increase as people are exposed to an idea between ten and twenty times, with additional exposure still useful for more complex ideas. Interestingly,”
Adam M. Grant, Originals: How Nonconformists Move the World

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